Yale University.Calendar.Directories.

Degree-Granting Departments and Programs

This section provides information on all degree-granting departments and programs of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Each listing provides a roster of faculty, special admissions and degree requirements, and course offerings for that department or program. The requirements appearing in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Programs and Policies take precedence over any statements published separately by individual departments and programs.

The degree requirements of the Graduate School itself appear later in this publication, under Policies and Regulations. These apply to all students in the Graduate School, although there are variations in the pattern of their fulfillment in individual departments and programs. The requirements of the Graduate School may change from time to time. If a requirement changes within the period normally required for completion of a student’s course of study, the student will normally be given the choice of completing either the new or the old requirement.

The requirements of individual departments also may change from time to time, with the approval of the Graduate School. After such approval has officially been given, students in that department or program will receive written notification. All changes in departmental degree requirements occurring after the publication closing date of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Programs and Policies bulletin are posted on the departments’ Web sites. General changes to degree requirements will be posted on the Graduate School’s Web site.

The course listings and instructors that follow reflect information received by the registrar as of the publication date and are subject to change without notice. Students are advised to consult www.yale.edu/oci for the most recent information.

Fall-term courses are indicated by the letter “a,” spring-term courses by the letter “b”; summer courses are indicated by the letter “c.” Yearlong courses have no letter designation or list both “a” and “b.” A superscript “u” after a course number indicates that the course also has a Yale College course number. Courses in brackets are not offered during the current academic year.

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African American Studies

81 Wall Street, 203.432.1170

http://afamstudies.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Jacqueline Goldsby (81 Wall St., jacqueline.goldsby@yale.edu)

Director of Graduate Studies

Daphne Brooks (81 Wall St., daphne.brooks@yale.edu)

Professors Elijah Anderson (on leave [Sp]), David Blight, Daphne Brooks, Hazel Carby, Glenda Gilmore (on leave [Sp]), Jacqueline Goldsby, Emily Greenwood (on leave [Sp]), Jonathan Holloway, Matthew Jacobson (on leave), Gerald Jaynes, Kobena Mercer (on leave [Sp]), Christopher Miller (on leave [Sp]), Joseph Roach, Robert Stepto (on leave [F]), Michael Veal

Associate Professors Crystal Feimster, Anthony Reed (on leave [F]), Edward Rugemer, Vesla Weaver

Assistant Professors Erica James, Christopher Lebron

Fields of Study

The Department of African American Studies offers a combined Ph.D. in conjunction with several other departments and programs: currently, American Studies, Anthropology, English, Film and Media Studies, French, History, History of Art, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese. Within the field of study, the student will select an area of concentration in consultation with the directors of graduate studies (DGS) of African American Studies and the joint department or program. An area of concentration in African American Studies may take the form of a single area study or a comparative area study: e.g., Caribbean or African American literature, a comparison of African American literature in a combined degree with the Department of English; an investigation of the significance of the presence of African cultures in the New World, either in the Caribbean or in Latin and/or South America in a combined degree with the Spanish and Portuguese department. An area of concentration may also follow the fields of study already established within a single discipline: e.g., race/minority/ethnic studies in a combined degree with Sociology. An area of concentration must either be a field of study offered by a department or fall within the rubric of such a field. Please refer to the description of fields of study of the prospective joint department or program.

Special Admissions Requirements

Strong undergraduate preparation in a discipline related to African American studies; writing sample; description of the fields of interest to be pursued in a combined degree. This is a combined degree program. To be considered for admission to this program you must indicate both African American Studies and one of the participating departments/programs listed above. Additionally, please indicate both departments on all supporting documents (personal statement, letters of recommendation, transcripts, etc.).

Requirements for Transfer into the African American Studies Combined Ph.D. Program

A student currently enrolled in one of the departments or programs participating in the combined Ph.D. in African American Studies who desires to transfer into the combined Ph.D. program may do so after:

  • 1. Providing the DGS of African American Studies with a written statement of interest detailing the reasons for the transfer;
  • 2. Providing the DGS with a letter of support from an African American Studies faculty member agreeing to serve as the student’s adviser;
  • 3. A vote by the African American Studies faculty approving the transfer, with such vote held at a department meeting no earlier than the spring term of the student’s first year as a graduate student at Yale.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students will be subject to the combined Ph.D. supervision of the African American Studies department and the relevant participating department or program. The student’s academic program will be decided in consultation with an adviser, the DGS of African American Studies, and the DGS of the participating department or program and must be approved by all three. Students are required to take five courses in African American Studies, generally at least one course each term. Any variance in scheduling requires DGS approval. Core courses are (1) Theorizing Racial Formations (AFAM 505a/AMST 643a), which is a required course for all first-year graduate students in the combined program, and (2) Dissertation Prospectus Workshop (AFAM 895), a two-term course, which graduate students in their third year of study must satisfactorily complete. This workshop is intended to support preparation of the dissertation proposal; each student will be required to present his or her dissertation prospectus orally to the faculty and to turn in a written prospectus draft by the end of spring term. Three other graduate-level African American Studies courses are required: (1) a history course, (2) a social science course, and (3) a course in literature or culture.

Qualifying examinations and the dissertation proposal will be administered jointly by the African American Studies department and the participating department or program and must be passed within the time required by the participating department or program. A current tenured or ladder faculty member in African American Studies must serve on the dissertation committee, and the dissertation must have an African American Studies component. The total number of courses required will adhere to the requirements of the participating department or program. Each student must complete the minimum number of courses required by the participating department or program; African American Studies courses (excepting the dissertation prospectus workshop) count toward the participating department’s or program’s total. For details of these requirements, see the special requirements of the combined Ph.D. for the particular department or program printed in this bulletin. Students will be required to meet the foreign language requirements of the participating department or program (see Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations). Students will not be admitted to candidacy until all requirements, including the dissertation prospectus, have been met and approved by the Graduate Studies Executive Committee of the African American Studies department and the participating department or program. If a student intends to apply for this combined Ph.D. in African American Studies and another department or program, he or she should consult the other department’s or program’s Ph.D. requirements and courses.

The faculty in African American Studies consider teaching to be an essential component of graduate education, and students therefore will teach, under the supervision of departmental professors, in their third and fourth years.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.A. (en route to the combined Ph.D.) Students will be awarded a combined M.A. degree in African American Studies and the relevant participating department or program upon successful completion of all course work except the Dissertation Prospectus Workshop, which is taken in the student’s third year of study. See also Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

More information is available on the department’s Web site, http://afamstudies.yale.edu.

Courses

AFAM 505a/AMST 643a, Theorizing Racial Formations Christopher Lebron

A required course for all first-year students in the combined Ph.D. program in African American Studies; also open to students in American Studies. This interdisciplinary reading seminar focuses on new work that is challenging the temporal, theoretical, and spatial boundaries of the field. M 9:25–11:15

AFAM 511b/HSAR 698b/WGSS 698b, Fault Lines: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art Erica James

This seminar examines moments in which prevailing representational paradigms of race, gender, and sexuality were disrupted and transformed, affecting three-dimensional paradigm shifts in reading of race, gender, and sexuality in fine art and visual culture. Students deepen their engagement with and writing on this work beyond the ghetto of identity politics by considering multiple methods of theoretical analyses simultaneously. Sites of rupture include the art and visual culture that emerged around the figure of the boxer through Jack Johnson and Muhammad Ali; African diaspora visual poetics in the youth culture of South Africa and Jamaica; and the work of contemporary artists Kalup Linzy, Mickalene Thomas, and Iona Rozeal Brown. TH 1:30–3:20

AFAM 514a/AMST 735a/ENGL 950a, A Sound Theory of Blackness: African American Literature and Music in High Fidelity Daphne Brooks

An exploration of sonic theory and the African American literary tradition from the nineteenth century through the millennium with special emphasis on major debates in jazz studies and a critical (re)examination of blues ideologies, as well as the politics and poetics of spirituals, R&B and soul, funk, Afrofuturism, punk, pop, and hip-hop. The course places the work of a range of cultural theorists (Douglass, Du Bois, Adorno, Hurston, Ellison, Murray, Baraka, Mackey, Carby, Spillers, O’Meally, Griffin, Moten, Edwards, Radano, Nancy, Szendy, Perry, Weheliye, etc.) in conversation with key texts and epochs in black letters. T 1:30–3:20

AFAM 546b/WGSS 610b, Theories of Race, Sex, and Injustice Joseph Fischel

Explorations of race, sex, and gender in political theories of injustice; identity formations as ambivalent aspirations for justice theory and justice politics; the body as policed, desired, and desiring; “matter” as idiom of justice. T 1:30–3:20

AFAM 558a/AMST 688a/HIST 577a/RLST 688a/WGSS 695a, Historicizing Religion Kathryn Lofton

What does it mean to offer a history of religion? How is a history of religion distinct from, or overlapping with, the history of race or gender? This course takes as its central subject a key methodological problem of modernity, namely the task to offer material accounts for human perception, social organization, and epistemological vantage. We read new historical monographs and relevant classic theories that consider what religion is, how its categorization is like and unlike other concepts for human distinction, and why it became something in modernity requiring historical diagnosis. Included in our topical survey are examinations of secularization and disenchantment; myth and narrative; church history and hagiography; objectivity and positivism; world religions and comparative religions; Orientalism and colonialism; sectarianism and secularism. Works read include Elizabeth A. Clark, History, Theory, Text: Historians and the Linguistic Turn; Sylvester Johnson, African American Religions, 1500–2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom; and Suzanne Marchand, German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race, and Scholarship. M 9:25–11:15

AFAM 584a/SOCY 584a, Inequality, Race, and the City Elijah Anderson

Urban inequality in America. The racial iconography of the city is explored and represented, and the dominant cultural narrative of civic pluralism is considered. Topics of concern include urban poverty, race relations, ethnicity, class, privilege, education, social networks, social deviance, and crime. M 11:30–1:20

AFAM 588bU/AMST 710bU/ENGL 948bU, Autobiography in America Robert Stepto

A study of autobiographical writings from Mary Rowlandson’s Indian captivity narrative (1682) to the present. Classic forms such as immigrant, education, and cause narratives; prevailing autobiographical strategies involving place, work, and photographs. Authors include Franklin, Douglass, Jacobs, Antin, Kingston, Uchida, Balakian, Als, and Karr. M 1:30–3:20

AFAM 616a/AMST 880a/WGSS 616a, Imagined Futures: Species Being, Biotechnologies, and Planetary Relations in Literature, Art, and Music  Hazel Carby

This course interrogates the premises of speculative fiction alongside the futuristic compositions of visual artists and musicians. The theoretical and historical frameworks of the course are shaped by a deep engagement with questions of the possibilities and limits of the human, addressing theoretical and imaginative questions of species being, hybridity, genders and sexualities, racialization, and relationships between biology, technology, and the body. Readings in cultural and postcolonial theory provide an important lens into this material, and students are asked to consider how colonial and imperial pasts and presents inform future imaginings or provide the motivation for creative artists to envision alternative futures. T 2:30–4:20

AFAM 622a/PLSC 851a, Race and Ethnicity in American Politics Vesla Weaver

This course examines different theories for understanding the racial order—non-zero-sum mobility, racial triangulation, interest convergence, racial resentment, capture, among others—as well as strategic responses by minorities to the racial order to undermine disadvantages: linked fate, distancing, threat mobilization, and coalition formation. Various social science methods are used. TH 9:25–11:15

AFAM 660bU/AFST 678bU/CPLT 678bU/ENGL 938bU/JDST 678bU, The Literatures of Blacks and Jews in the Twentieth Century Marc Kaplan

This seminar compares representative writings by African, Caribbean, and African American authors of the past one hundred years, together with European, American, and South African Jewish authors writing in Yiddish, Hebrew, French, and English. This comparison examines the paradoxically central role played by minority, “marginal” groups in the creation of modern literature and the articulation of the modern experience. TH 1:30–3:20

AFAM 705b/AMST 708b/ENGL 708b/HIST 708b/HSHM 729b, The History of Race  Greta LaFleur

This course offers a broad survey of the history of racial science and racialist thinking in the Atlantic world from the early modern period through the late nineteenth century. Rather than attempting to detail the histories of specific racial formations (such as blackness or whiteness), the course tracks the intellectual history of the emergence of “race” as a specific category of human differentiation and traces a swath of its most muscular—and pernicious—permutations through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. W 1:30–3:20

AFAM 716a/AMST 910a/HIST 764a, Working Group on Latina/o Studies I  Stephen Pitti, Alicia Schmidt Camacho

A continuous workshop for graduate students in American Studies, History, African American Studies, and related fields. This group devotes the fall term to intensive reading and discussion of important interdisciplinary texts in Latina/o studies. Students interested in participating should contact stephen.pitti@yale.edu. F 9:25–11:15

AFAM 718b/AMST 911b/HIST 765b, Working Group on Latina/o Studies II  Stephen Pitti, Alicia Schmidt Camacho

A continuous workshop for graduate students in American Studies, History, African American Studies, and related fields. The spring term focuses on the development of individual research projects and on public history work with the Smithsonian Museums and organizations in New Haven. Students interested in participating should contact stephen.pitti@yale.edu. F 9:25–11:15

AFAM 723b/AMST 645b/CPLT 949b/WGSS 645b, Caribbean Diasporic Intellectuals  Hazel Carby

This course examines work by writers of Caribbean descent from different regions of the transatlantic world. In response to contemporary interest in issues of globalization, the premise of the course is that in the world maps of these black intellectuals we can see the intertwined and interdependent histories and relations of the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Thinking globally is not a new experience for black peoples, and we need to understand the ways in which what we have come to understand and represent as “Caribbeanness” is a condition of movement. Literature is most frequently taught within the boundaries of a particular nation, but this course focuses on the work of writers who shape the Caribbean identities of their characters as traveling black subjects and refuse to restrain their fiction within the limits of any one national identity. We practice a new and global type of cognitive mapping as we read and explore the meanings of terms like black transnationalism, migrancy, globalization, and empire. Diasporic writing embraces and represents the geopolitical realities of the modern, modernizing, and postmodern worlds in which multiple racialized histories are inscribed on modern bodies. T 2:30–4:20

AFAM 738a/AMST 706a/HIST 711a/WGSS 716a, Readings in African American Women’s History Crystal Feimster

The diversity of African American women’s lives from the colonial era through the late twentieth century. Using primary and secondary sources we explore the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that produced change and transformation in the lives of African American women. Through history, fiction, autobiography, art, religion, film, music, and cultural criticism we discuss and explore the construction of African American women’s activism and feminism; the racial politics of the body, beauty, and complexion; hetero- and same-sex sexualities; intraracial class relations; and the politics of identity, family, and work. M 1:30–3:20

AFAM 764a/AMST 715a/HIST 715a, Readings in Nineteenth-Century America  David Blight

The course explores recent trends and historiography on several problems through the middle of the nineteenth century: sectionalism, expansion; slavery and the Old South; northern society and reform movements; Civil War causation; the meaning of the Confederacy; why the North won the Civil War; the political, constitutional, and social meanings of emancipation and Reconstruction; violence in Reconstruction society; the relationships between social/cultural and military/political history; problems in historical memory; the tension between narrative and analytical history writing; and the ways in which race and gender have reshaped research and interpretive agendas. W 1:30–3:20

AFAM 775a/AMST 771a/ENGL 981a, Affect Theory Tavia Nyong’o

This seminar traces the emergence of affect, sense, feeling, and mood as critical keywords in American studies. Particular attention is paid to the manner in which queer theorists such as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Lauren Berlant, Ann Cvetkovich, Heather Love, Jennifer Doyle, Jonathan Flatley, and José Esteban Muñoz developed the concept in what has been called “the affective turn” in queer and feminist aesthetics. The philosophical basis of affect theory in the writings of Spinoza, Heidegger, and Deleuze form the core of the seminar. We also look to an alternate genealogy for affect politics in the writings of Bergson and Deleuze on fabulation. We consider the psychoanalytic take on affect, in particular the object relations school of Klein and Winnicott, and we read critics who contrast affect theory with trauma theory. Marxist contributions to affect theory include readings from Virno (on humor), Hardt and Negri (on affective labor), and Rancière (on the distribution of the sensible). The writings of Jasbir Puar and Brian Massumi on the affective politics of contemporary war, empire, and societies of control are also considered, as are writings by Fred Moten, Saidiya Hartman, and Frank Wilderson on optimism and pessimism as moods/modalities of black studies. M 1:30–3:20

AFAM 776b/REL 704b, “Beyond the Veil”: Approaches to the Study of Black Religion in the United States Clarence Hardy

This course explores how scholars have developed and pursued the modern study of black religion in the United States from its inception in the early decades of the twentieth century, through its institutionalization in the academy after the civil rights movement, and its continued evolution in contemporary times. The course focuses especially on pioneers in the field (e.g., W.E.B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, and Carter Woodson) and considers the rise of competing methodologies for the study of black religious cultures—ranging from the historical to the sociological, while including at various moments the theological, anthropological, and literary. Special attention is given to the ways in which racial and religious identities have shaped and confounded scholarly efforts to interpret black religious subjects, even as these identities have also provided a platform for interrogating the meaning of race, nation, and the nature of political commitment in America. T 1:30–3:20

AFAM 793b/AMST 694b/ENGL 955b, Colonial Theater, Postcolonial Drama, and World Performance Joseph Roach

Uniting the approaches of theater history, dramaturgy, and performance studies, this seminar begins with the case study of Lolita Chakrabarti’s Red Velvet (2012, revived 2016), a play about the life of Ira Aldridge (1807–1867), the African American actor who is said to be the first black man to play Othello. Readings include plays, critical theories, and historical documents from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first. The seminar is organized around selected genealogies of performance as represented by adaptations, revivals, and critical rewritings: Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko by Thomas Southerne and Biyi Bandele-Thomas; John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera by Bertolt Brecht, Wole Soyinka, and P.L. Deshpande; Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Derek Walcott; and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot by Femi Osofisan and Suzan-Lori Parks. W 3:30–5:20

AFAM 797a/AMST 797a/HIST 797a, Atlantic Abolitions Marcela Echeverri, Edward Rugemer

This readings course explores the historiography on the century of abolition, when the new states of the Americas abolished racial slavery. Beginning with the first abolitions in the U.S. North during the 1780s, we consider the emergence and process of abolition throughout the Atlantic world, including the Caribbean, Spanish America, and Brazil, through the 1880s. TH 9:25–11:15

AFAM 802a/AMST 804a/HIST 750a, Readings in African American History since 1865 Glenda Gilmore

Students read major secondary works alongside key primary sources on African American history from 1865 to the present. The course covers Reconstruction; the Jim Crow era; the Long Civil Rights Movement, including its classical phase; African American transnationalism; and urban, political, and labor history from the African American perspective. The course emphasizes gender and racial formation. Students read thematically within the course, make class presentations, and write a historiographical paper. W 1:30–3:20

AFAM 826a/HSAR 783a, Theorizing Diaspora Kobena Mercer

This seminar reviews different methods in the study of diasporas and demonstrates their application in research on visual culture and art history. Models addressed to African American, Caribbean, and black British contexts by Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, James Clifford, Brent Hayes Edwards, among others, are examined in relation to art, film, and photography that articulate cross-cultural aesthetics. Debates on hybridization that led to such cognate concepts as syncretism, creolization, and translation are tested in comparative case studies. Texts include Homi Bhabha, Sarat Maharaj, Jean Fisher, Edouard Glissant, and Jan Nederveen Pieterse; and book-length introductions by Robin Cohen, Global Diasporas (2d ed., 2008), and Sudesh Mishra, Diaspora Criticism (2006). TH 3:30–5:20

AFAM 851a/CPLT 989a/FREN 943a, Creole Identities and Fictions  Christopher Miller

Focusing on the French and English Caribbean, the course analyzes the quintessential but ambiguous American condition: that of the “Creole.” Encompassing all nonnative cultures, this term is inseparable from issues of race and slavery. Readings of historical and literary texts: Moreau de Saint-Méry, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Madame de Staël, Charlotte Brontë (and reinventions of Wuthering Heights by Jean Rhys and Maryse Condé), the Créolistes of Martinique. Attention to Louisiana and to the Haitian Revolution. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of French. TH 1:30–3:20

AFAM 880a or b, Directed Reading

By arrangement with faculty.

AFAM 895a and b, Dissertation Prospectus Workshop Daphne Brooks

A noncredit, two-term course, which graduate students in their third year of study must satisfactorily complete. This workshop is intended to support preparation of the dissertation proposal.

For course offerings in African languages, see African Studies.

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African Studies

Council on African Studies

The MacMillan Center

309 Luce Hall, 203.432.9903

http://african.macmillan.yale.edu

M.A.

Chair

Michael Cappello (Pediatrics; Microbial Pathogenesis; Public Health)

Director of Graduate Studies

David Simon (203.432.5243, david.simon@yale.edu)

Director of Program in African Languages

Kiarie Wa’Njogu (203.432.0110, john.wanjogu@yale.edu)

Professors Serap Aksoy (Epidemiology), Lea Brilmayer (Law), John Darnell (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Owen Fiss (Law), Gerald Friedland (Internal Medicine; Epidemiology), Robert Harms (History), Roderick McIntosh (Anthropology), Christopher Miller (French; African American Studies; on leave [Sp]), Stephanie Newell (English), Catherine Panter-Brick (Anthropology), Curtis Patton (Emeritus, Epidemiology), Ashgar Rastegar (Internal Medicine), Lamin Sanneh (History; Divinity), Ian Shapiro (Political Science), Robert Thompson (Emeritus, History of Art), Christopher Udry (Economics), Michael Veal (Music), Immanuel Wallerstein (Emeritus, Sociology), David Watts (Anthropology), Elisabeth Wood (Political Science)

Associate Professors Theodore Cohen (Epidemiology), Kaveh Khoshnood (Epidemiology), Adria Lawrence (Political Science; on leave), Daniel Magaziner (History), Urania Magriples (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), Elijah Paintsil (Pediatrics; Epidemiology; Pharmacology), Jonathan Wyrtzen (Sociology; on leave)

Assistant Professors Katharine Baldwin (Political Science; on leave), Louisa Lombard (Anthropology; on leave [Sp]), Hani Mowafi (Emergency Medicine), Doruk Ozgediz (Surgery; Pediatrics), Sunil Parikh (Public Health; Medicine), Tracy Rabin (Internal Medicine), Jeremy Schwartz (Internal Medicine), Brian Wood (Anthropology)

Lecturers Anne-Marie Foltz (Epidemiology & Public Health), W. Casey King (Public Health), Sarah Ryan (Law), David Simon (Political Science), Jason Stearns (Political Science), Veronica Waweru (African Languages)

Senior Lectors II Sandra Sanneh (African Languages), Kiarie Wa’Njogu (African Languages)

Senior Lectors Oluseye Adesola (African Languages), Matuku Ngame (French)

Fields of Study

African Studies considers the arts, history, cultures, languages, literatures, politics, religions, and societies of Africa as well as issues concerning development, health, and the environment. Considerable flexibility and choice of areas of concentration are offered because students entering the program may have differing academic backgrounds and career plans. Enrollment in the M.A. program in African Studies provides students with the opportunity to register for the many African studies courses offered in the various departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools.

The Program in African Studies also offers two interdisciplinary seminars to create dialogue and to integrate approaches across disciplines. In addition to the M.A. degree program, the Council on African Studies offers students in the University’s doctoral and other professional degree programs the chance to obtain a Graduate Certificate of Concentration in African Studies by fulfilling a supplementary curriculum (see the section on the African Studies Council, under Non-Degree Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes). Joint degrees are possible with the approval of the director of graduate studies (DGS) and the relevant officials in the schools of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Law, Management, and Public Health.

The African collections of the Yale libraries together represent one of the largest holdings on Africa found in North America. The University now possesses more than 220,000 volumes including, but not limited to, government documents, art catalogues, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence, and theses, many published in Africa.

Special Admissions Requirement

The GRE General Test is required.

Special Requirements for the M.A. Degree

The Yale University Master of Arts degree program in African Studies was instituted in 1986. The two-year interdisciplinary, graduate-level curriculum is intended for students who will later continue in a Ph.D. program or a professional school, or for those who will enter business, government service, or another career in which a sound knowledge of Africa is essential or valuable. A student may choose one of the following areas of concentration: history; anthropology; political science; sociology; arts and literatures; languages and linguistics; religion; environmental and development studies; and public health.

The program requires sixteen courses: two compulsory introductory interdisciplinary seminars, Research Methods in African Studies (AFST 501a) and Topics in African Studies (AFST 764b) or an alternate course, as specifically designated by the DGS; four courses of instruction in an African language; four courses in one of the foregoing areas of concentration; four other approved courses offered in the Graduate School or professional schools; and two terms of directed reading and research (AFST 590a and 900b) during which students will complete the required thesis. A student who is able to demonstrate advanced proficiency in an African language may have the language requirement waived and substitute four other approved courses. The choice of courses must be approved by the DGS, with whom students should consult as soon as possible in the first term.

The Master’s Thesis

The master’s thesis is based on research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen topic. Students must submit their thesis for joint evaluation by the adviser and a second reader, who is chosen by the student in consultation with the DGS.

Program in African Languages

The language program offers instruction in four major languages from sub-Saharan Africa: Kiswahili (eastern and central Africa), Wolof (west Africa), Yorùbá (west Africa), and isiZulu (southern Africa). Language-related courses and language courses for professionals are also offered. African language courses emphasize communicative competence, and instructors use multimedia materials that focus on the contemporary African context. Course sequences are designed to enable students to achieve advanced competence in all skill areas by the end of the third year, and the African Languages program encourages students to spend one summer or term in Africa during their language study.

Noncredited instruction in other African languages is available by application through the Directed Independent Language Study program at the Center for Language Study. Contact the director of the Program in African Languages.

More information is available on the program’s Web site, http://african.macmillan.yale.edu.

Courses

AFST 501au, Research Methods in African Studies

Disciplinary and interdisciplinary research methodologies in African studies. The focus of the course is on field methods and archival research in the social sciences and humanities. Topics include use of African studies and disciplinary sources (including bibliographical databases and African studies archives), research design, interviewing, survey methods, analysis of sources, and the development of databases and research collections. M 1:30–3:20

[AFST 541bu, Comparative Perspectives on African Literatures]

[AFST 548bU/SOCY 548bU, Islamic Social Movements]

[AFST 573bU/SOCY 563bU, Imperialism, Insurgency, and State Building in the Middle East and North Africa]

[AFST 582aU/SOCY 559aU, Comparative Nationalism in North Africa and the Middle East]

AFST 590aU, African Studies Colloquium

AFST 630bU, Language Planning in Sub-Saharan Africa Kiarie Wa’Njogu

Examination of language policies in selected sub-Saharan African countries. Analysis of language use in different contexts; assessment of the impact of globalization on African languages. W 1:30–3:20

AFST 639aU/ANTH 639aU, Political Anthropology and Africa Louisa Lombard

A historical-anthropological study of politics in Africa. How have anthropologists made sense of the workings of African politics, both those of state and nonstate actors? This course charts how African states came into being, how they operate, and how state agents and the people they govern negotiate legitimacy, authority, and belonging. W 3:30–5:20

AFST 647aU, The Rwandan Genocide in Comparative Context Jason Stearns

An examination of the 1994 Rwandan genocide: historical sources of the conflict, the motivations of the killers, actions and reactions of outside actors, efforts to reconstruct a post-genocide society, and continuation of the genocidal dynamic within the Great Lakes region. Consideration of other countries in similar situations, as well as other genocides in recent decades. T 3:30–5:20

AFST 678bU/AFAM 660bU/CPLT 678bU/ENGL 938bU/JDST 678bU, The Literatures of Blacks and Jews in the Twentieth Century Marc Kaplan

This seminar compares representative writings by African, Caribbean, and African American authors of the past one hundred years, together with European, American, and South African Jewish authors writing in Yiddish, Hebrew, French, and English. This comparison examines the paradoxically central role played by minority, “marginal” groups in the creation of modern literature and the articulation of the modern experience. TH 1:30–3:20

AFST 680bu, Nigeria and Its Diaspora Oluseye Adesola

Nigerians in the modern diaspora, both those who endured forced migration and those who migrated voluntarily. Specific reference to the Igbos and the Yorùbás. The preservation and maintenance of Nigerian culture, history, dance, literature, traditional education, theater, politics, art, music, film, religion, and folklore, especially in African American and Nigerian American contexts.

AFST 746b/ENGL 936b, Postcolonial World Literature and Theory  Stephanie Newell

Introduction to key debates about post-1945 world literature in English, the politics of English as a language of world literature, and theories of globalization and postcolonial culture. Course themes include colonial history, postcolonial migration, translation, national identity, cosmopolitanism, writing the self, global literary prizes. TH 9:25–11:15

AFST 830b/HIST 830b, Cities, Media, and Culture in Twentieth-Century Africa  Daniel Magaziner

This seminar considers the scholarship on African urban life during the twentieth century. We read recent works about intellectual and cultural history, infrastructure and technology, political economy, urban planning, and media. In consultation with the instructor, students spend the last weeks of the course developing a study of a specific African city based on a mix of secondary literature and a dedicated primary source. W 1:30–3:20

AFST 837b/HIST 837b, Decolonization and Independence in Africa Robert Harms

This seminar looks at the process of decolonization in twentieth-century Africa and explores some of the major political, economic, and cultural forces that influenced the trajectories of independent African countries. W 9:25–11:15

AFST 839a/HIST 839a, Environmental History of Africa Robert Harms

An examination of the interaction between people and their environment in Africa and the ways in which this interaction has affected or shaped the course of African history. W 9:25–11:15

AFST 900b, Master’s Thesis David Simon and faculty

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

AFST 951a or b, Directed Reading and Research David Simon and faculty

By arrangement with faculty.

SWAH 610au, Beginning Kiswahili I Kiarie Wa’Njogu

A beginning course with intensive training and practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Initial emphasis is on the spoken language and conversation. Credit only on completion of SWAH 620b. MTWThF 9:25–10:15

SWAH 620bu, Beginning Kiswahili II Kiarie Wa’Njogu

Continuation of SWAH 610a. Texts provide an introduction to the basic structure of Kiswahili and to the culture of the speakers of the language. Prerequisite: SWAH 610a. MTWThF 9:25–10:15

SWAH 630au, Intermediate Kiswahili I Veronica Waweru

Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Prepares students for further work in literary, language, and cultural studies as well as for a functional use of Kiswahili. Study of structure and vocabulary is based on a variety of texts from traditional and popular culture. Emphasis on command of idiomatic usage and stylistic nuance. Prerequisite: SWAH 620b. MTWThF 11:35–12:25

SWAH 640bu, Intermediate Kiswahili II

Continuation of SWAH 630a. MTWThF 11:35–12:25

SWAH 650au, Advanced Kiswahili I Kiarie Wa’Njogu

Development of fluency through readings and discussions on contemporary issues in Kiswahili. Introduction to literary criticism in Kiswahili. Materials include Kiswahili oral literature, prose, poetry, and plays, as well as texts drawn from popular and political culture. Prerequisite: SWAH 640b. TTH 1–2:15

SWAH 660bu, Advanced Kiswahili II Kiarie Wa’Njogu

Continuation of SWAH 650a. TTH 1–2:15

SWAH 670aU, Topics in Kiswahili Literature Kiarie Wa’Njogu

Advanced readings and discussion with emphasis on literary and historical texts. Reading assignments include materials on Kiswahili prose, plays, poetry, Kiswahili dialects, and the history of the language. TTH 10:30–11:20, F 8:20–9:10

SWAH 671bU, Topics in Kiswahili Literature Kiarie Wa’Njogu

Advanced readings and discussion with emphasis on literary and historical texts. Reading assignments include materials on Kiswahili prose, plays, poetry, Kiswahili dialects, and the history of the language. TTH 11:35–12:50

YORU 610au, Beginning Yorùbá I Oluseye Adesola

Training and practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Initial emphasis is on the spoken aspect, with special attention to unfamiliar consonantal sounds, nasal vowels, and tone, using isolated phrases, set conversational pieces, and simple dialogues. Multimedia materials provide audio practice and cultural information. Credit only on completion of YORU 620b. MTWThF 10:30–11:20

YORU 620bu, Beginning Yorùbá II Oluseye Adesola

Continuing practice in using and recognizing tone through dialogues. More emphasis is placed on simple cultural texts and role playing. Prerequisite: YORU 610a. MTWThF 10:30–11:20

YORU 630au, Intermediate Yorùbá I Oluseye Adesola

Refinement of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. More natural texts are provided to prepare students for work in literary, language, and cultural studies as well as for a functional use of Yorùbá. Prerequisite: YORU 620b. MTWThF 11:35–12:25

YORU 640bu, Intermediate Yorùbá II Oluseye Adesola

Students are exposed to more idiomatic use of the language in a variety of interactions, including occupational, social, religious, and educational. Cultural documents include literary and nonliterary texts. Prerequisite: YORU 630a. MTWThF 11:35–12:25

YORU 650au, Advanced Yorùbá I Oluseye Adesola

An advanced course intended to improve aural and reading comprehension as well as speaking and writing skills. Emphasis is on acquiring a command of idiomatic usage and stylistic nuance. Study materials include literary and nonliterary texts; social, political, and popular entertainment media such as video movies and recorded poems (ewì); and music. Prerequisite: YORU 640b. 3 HTBA

YORU 660bu, Advanced Yorùbá II Oluseye Adesola

Continuing development of aural and reading comprehension, and speaking and writing skills, with emphasis on idiomatic usage and stylistic nuance. Study materials are selected to reflect research interests of the students. Prerequisite: YORU 650a. 3 HTBA

YORU 670au or bu, Topics in Yorùbá Literature and Culture Oluseye Adesola

The course provides students with the opportunity to acquire Yorùbá up to the superior level. It is designed to give an in-depth discussion on advanced readings on Yorùbá literature and culture. It focuses on Yorùbá history, poetry, novels, dramas, and oral folklore. It also seeks to uncover the basics of the Yorùbá culture in communities where Yorùbá is spoken across the globe, with particular emphasis on Nigeria. It examines movies, texts, and written literature to gain insight into the Yorùbá philosophy and ways of life. TTH 4–5:15

YORU 680aU, Advanced Topics in Yorùbá Literature and Culture Oluseye Adesola

A course for students with advanced proficiency in Yorùbá who are interested in discussion and research in Yorùbá at a level not covered by existing courses. A term paper or its equivalent is required. TTH 1–2:15

YORU 682bU, Advanced Topics in Yorùbá Literature and Culture II  Oluseye Adesola

Continuation of YORU 680a. TTH 1–2:15

ZULU 610aU, Beginning isiZulu I Sandra Sanneh

A beginning course in conversational isiZulu, using Web-based materials filmed in South Africa. Emphasis on the sounds of the language, including clicks and tonal variation, and on the words and structures needed for initial social interaction. Brief dialogues concern everyday activities; aspects of contemporary Zulu culture are introduced through readings and documentaries in English. Credit only on completion of ZULU 620b. MTWTHF 11:35–12:25

ZULU 620bU, Beginning isiZulu II Sandra Sanneh

Development of communication skills through dialogues and role play. Texts and songs are drawn from traditional and popular literature and songs. Students research daily life in selected areas of South Africa. Prerequisite: ZULU 610a. MTWTHF 11:35–12:25

ZULU 630au, Intermediate isiZulu I Sandra Sanneh

Development of basic fluency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing isiZulu, using Web-based materials filmed in South Africa. Students describe and narrate spoken and written paragraphs. Review of morphology; concentration on tense and aspect. Materials are drawn from contemporary popular culture, folklore, and mass media. Prerequisite: ZULU 620b. MTWThF 9:25–10:15

ZULU 640bu, Intermediate isiZulu II Sandra Sanneh

Students read longer texts from popular media as well as myths and folktales. Students are prepared for initial research involving interaction with speakers of isiZulu in South Africa, and for the study of oral and literary genres. Prerequisite: ZULU 630a. MTWThF 9:25–10:15

ZULU 650aU, Advanced isiZulu I Sandra Sanneh

Development of fluency in using idioms, speaking about abstract concepts, and voicing preferences and opinions. Excerpts are drawn from oral genres, short stories, and dramas made for television. Introduction to other South African languages and to issues of standardization, dialect, and language attitude. Prerequisite: ZULU 640b. 3 HTBA

ZULU 660bU, Advanced isiZulu II Sandra Sanneh

Readings may include short stories, a novel, praise poetry, historical texts, or contemporary political speeches, depending on student interests. Study of issues of language policy and use in contemporary South Africa; introduction to the Soweto dialect of isiZulu. Students are prepared for extended research in South Africa involving interviews with isiZulu speakers. Prerequisite: ZULU 650a.

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American Studies

230 Hall of Graduate Studies, 203.432.1186

http://americanstudies.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Kathryn Dudley (230 HGS, 203.432.1186)

Director of Graduate Studies

Joanne Meyerowitz (230 HGS, 203.432.1186)

Professors Jean-Christophe Agnew, Ned Blackhawk, David Blight, Daphne Brooks, Hazel Carby, George Chauncey (on leave [Sp]), Edward Cooke, Jr., Michael Denning, Wai Chee Dimock, Kathryn Dudley, John Mack Faragher (Emeritus), Glenda Gilmore (on leave [Sp]), Inderpal Grewal, Jonathan Holloway, Amy Hungerford, Matthew Jacobson (on leave), Kathryn Lofton, Mary Lui, Joanne Meyerowitz, Charles Musser, Tavia Nyong’o, Stephen Pitti, Sally Promey, Joseph Roach, Marc Robinson, Michael Roemer (Adjunct), Paul Sabin, Alicia Schmidt Camacho, Caleb Smith (on leave), Robert Stepto (on leave [F]), Harry Stout (on leave [Sp]), Michael Veal, John Harley Warner, Michael Warner, Laura Wexler

Associate Professors Crystal Feimster, Zareena Grewal, Elihu Rubin, Tisa Wenger

Assistant Professors Laura Barraclough, Greta LaFleur, Albert Laguna, Dixa Ramirez, Jenifer Van Vleck

Lecturers James Berger, Ronald Gregg (on leave [Sp])

Fields of Study

Fields include American literature, history, the arts and material culture, philosophy, cultural theory, and the social sciences.

Special Admissions Requirement

A twenty-page writing sample is required with the application.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

During the first two years of study students are required to take twelve term courses; at least half of these courses must be in American Studies. First-year students are also required to take AMST 600a, American Scholars (graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory).The student’s program will be decided in consultation with the adviser and the director of graduate studies (DGS). In each of the two years, the student should take at least one seminar devoted to research or requiring a substantial original paper, and must achieve two grades of Honors, with an average overall of High Pass.

Students are required to show proficiency in a language other than English; they may fulfill this requirement by (1) conducting substantial research in the chosen language as part of the course requirements for one of the twelve required seminars, (2) passing a translation test, offered each term by various language departments, or (3) receiving a grade of B or higher in a Yale College intermediate- or advanced-level language course or in a Yale language-for-reading course, such as French for Reading or German for Reading.

Upon completion of course work, students in their third year of study are required to participate in at least one term of a monthly prospectus workshop (AMST 902a and b). Intended to complement the work of the prospectus committee, the workshop is designed as a professionalization experience that culminates in students’ presentation of the dissertation prospectus at their prospectus colloquium.

Students should schedule the oral qualifying examinations in four fields, in the fifth term of study. Preparation, submission, and approval of the dissertation prospectus should be completed by the end of the sixth term, with a final deadline at the end of the seventh term with permission from the DGS. Students are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. upon completion of all predissertation requirements, including the prospectus. The faculty in American Studies considers training in teaching to be an important part of the program. Students in American Studies normally teach in years three and four.

Combined Ph.D. Programs

American Studies and African American Studies

The American Studies Program also offers, in conjunction with the Department of African American Studies, a combined Ph.D. in American Studies and African American Studies. This combined degree is most appropriate for students who intend to concentrate in and write a dissertation on any aspect of African American history, literature, or culture in the United States and other parts of the Americas. Applicants to the combined program must indicate on their application that they are applying both to American Studies and to African American Studies. All documentation within the application should include this information.

American Studies and Film and Media Studies

The American Studies Program also offers, in conjunction with the Film and Media Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in American Studies and Film and Media Studies. For further details, see Film and Media Studies. Applicants to the combined program must indicate on their application that they are applying both to American Studies and to Film and Media Studies. All documentation within the application should include this information.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) The M.A. is granted upon the completion of seven term courses (two grades must be Honors and the other five grades must average High Pass), and the successful completion of the language requirement. It can be petitioned for in the term following completion of the requirements. Candidates in combined programs will be awarded the master’s degree only when the master’s requirements for both programs have been met.

Public Humanities Concentration The M.A. with a concentration in Public Humanities is granted upon the completion of all requirements for the en route M.A. Of the seven term courses required, students must take four Public Humanities courses, including AMST 903, 904, 905.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program The basic requirements for this terminal degree are seven term courses, including a special writing project, and the successful completion of the language requirement. The project involves the submission of substantial written work either in conjunction with one course or as a tutorial that substitutes for one course. Students must earn a grade of Honors in two of their courses and an average grade of High Pass in the others.

More information is available on the department’s Web site, http://americanstudies.yale.edu.

Courses

AMST 600a, American Scholars Hazel Carby

“What would we really know the meaning of? The meal in the firkin; the milk in the pan; the ballad in the street; the news of the boat; the glance of the eye; the form and the gait of the body. The literature of the poor, the feelings of the child, the philosophy of the street, the meaning of household life, are the topics of the time.”

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, The American Scholar, 1837

A half-century ago American studies was a movement; now it is an institution. But it remains an anomaly in the academy, with neither method nor discipline: a modest program, not a department that immodestly claims the space between disciplines, beyond disciplines, and perhaps encompassing disciplines. In the early days, American studies was imagined as a home for Emerson’s American scholar; these days Emerson’s scholar is apt to be eyed more skeptically. Nevertheless the philosophy of the street and the meaning of household life continue to be the topics of the time, and American studies remains an oddly Emersonian place for nurturing intellectuals. To explore the various kinds of American scholars and American studies, the American Scholars colloquium meets weekly. Each week, we ask a member of the American Studies faculty: What are the key works that shape your intellectual project? What works pose the crucial issues? What works engage what you would really know the meaning of? Each speaks briefly and leads a discussion of the works chosen. There is no writing assignment, and students receive a credit for participating. This course is mandatory for first-year American Studies graduate students. W 9:25–11:15

AMST 622a/623b/CPLT 622a,b, Working Group on Globalization and Culture  Michael Denning

A continuing collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory,” that has been running since the fall of 2003. The group, made up of graduate students and faculty from several disciplines, meets regularly to discuss common readings, to develop collective and individual research projects, and to present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences for patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change. There are a small number of openings for second-year graduate students. Students interested in participating should contact michael.denning@yale.edu. M 1:30–3:20

AMST 643a/AFAM 505a, Theorizing Racial Formations Christopher Lebron

A required course for all first-year students in the combined Ph.D. program in African American Studies; also open to students in American Studies. This interdisciplinary reading seminar focuses on new work that is challenging the temporal, theoretical, and spatial boundaries of the field. M 9:25–11:15

AMST 645b/AFAM 723b/CPLT 949b/WGSS 645b, Caribbean Diasporic Intellectuals  Hazel Carby

This course examines work by writers of Caribbean descent from different regions of the transatlantic world. In response to contemporary interest in issues of globalization, the premise of the course is that in the world maps of these black intellectuals we can see the intertwined and interdependent histories and relations of the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Thinking globally is not a new experience for black peoples, and we need to understand the ways in which what we have come to understand and represent as “Caribbeanness” is a condition of movement. Literature is most frequently taught within the boundaries of a particular nation, but this course focuses on the work of writers who shape the Caribbean identities of their characters as traveling black subjects and refuse to restrain their fiction within the limits of any one national identity. We practice a new and global type of cognitive mapping as we read and explore the meanings of terms like black transnationalism, migrancy, globalization, and empire. Diasporic writing embraces and represents the geopolitical realities of the modern, modernizing, and postmodern worlds in which multiple racialized histories are inscribed on modern bodies. T 2:30–4:20

AMST 650a/HIST 807a, Resistance, Rebellion, and Survival Strategies in Modern Latin America Gilbert Joseph

An interdisciplinary examination of new conceptual and methodological approaches to such phenomena as peasants in revolution, millenarianism, “banditry,” refugee movements, and transnational migration. F 1:30–3:20

AMST 681b/DRAM 496b/ENGL 953b, The American Avant-Garde Marc Robinson

Topics include the Living Theater, Happenings, Cunningham/Cage, Open Theater, Judson Dance Theater, Grand Union, Bread and Puppet Theater, Ontological-Hysteric Theater, Theater of the Ridiculous, Meredith Monk, Robert Wilson, and the Wooster Group. TH 10–11:50

AMST 688a/AFAM 558a/HIST 577a/RLST 688a/WGSS 695a, Historicizing Religion Kathryn Lofton

What does it mean to offer a history of religion? How is a history of religion distinct from, or overlapping with, the history of race or gender? This course takes as its central subject a key methodological problem of modernity, namely the task to offer material accounts for human perception, social organization, and epistemological vantage. We read new historical monographs and relevant classic theories that consider what religion is, how its categorization is like and unlike other concepts for human distinction, and why it became something in modernity requiring historical diagnosis. Included in our topical survey are examinations of secularization and disenchantment; myth and narrative; church history and hagiography; objectivity and positivism; world religions and comparative religions; Orientalism and colonialism; sectarianism and secularism. Works read include Elizabeth A. Clark, History, Theory, Text: Historians and the Linguistic Turn; Sylvester Johnson, African American Religions, 1500–2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom; and Suzanne Marchand, German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race, and Scholarship. M 9:25–11:15

AMST 692b/HSAR 730b/JDST 799b/REL 967b/RLST 788b, Religion and the Performance of Space Sally Promey, Margaret Olin

This interdisciplinary seminar explores categories, interpretations, and strategic articulations of space in a range of religious traditions. In conversation with the work of major theorists of space, this seminar examines spatial practices of religion in the United States during the modern era, including the conception, construction, and enactment of religious spaces. It is structured around theoretical issues, including historical deployments of secularity as a framing mechanism, ideas about space and place, geography and gender, and relations between property and spirituality. Examples of case studies treated in class include the enactment of rituals within museums, the marking of religious boundaries such as the Jewish “eruv,” and the assignment of “spiritual” ownership in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. The seminar coordinates with several campus events, including research group presentations and an exhibition of work by Thomas Wilfred at the Yale University Art Gallery. Prerequisite: permission of the instructors; qualified undergraduates are welcome. M 3:30–5:20

AMST 694b/AFAM 793b/ENGL 955b, Colonial Theater, Postcolonial Drama, and World Performance Joseph Roach

Uniting the approaches of theater history, dramaturgy, and performance studies, this seminar begins with the case study of Lolita Chakrabarti’s Red Velvet (2012, revived 2016), a play about the life of Ira Aldridge (1807–1867), the African American actor who is said to be the first black man to play Othello. Readings include plays, critical theories, and historical documents from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first. The seminar is organized around selected genealogies of performance as represented by adaptations, revivals, and critical rewritings: Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko by Thomas Southerne and Biyi Bandele-Thomas; John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera by Bertolt Brecht, Wole Soyinka, and P.L. Deshpande; Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Derek Walcott; and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot by Femi Osofisan and Suzan-Lori Parks. W 3:30–5:20

AMST 703a/WGSS 630a, Postcolonial and Transnational Feminist Theories  Inderpal Grewal

An advanced survey course in feminist theory with a focus on postcolonial and transnational approaches. It is often assumed that if postcolonial theory focuses on history and historicity, then transnational theories emphasize space and place, assuming the importance of networks and flows. How might we think otherwise of these theoretical contributions? What are their connections across fields and areas? What, finally, are the ways that feminist theory has come to incorporate these approaches in the way that it conceptualizes the “international,” “global,” and “regional” in relation to histories of culture, politics, difference, and intersectionality. We examine these and other questions of disciplinarity, method, and history. W 3:30–5:30

AMST 706a/AFAM 738a/HIST 711a/WGSS 716a, Readings in African American Women’s History Crystal Feimster

The diversity of African American women’s lives from the colonial era through the late twentieth century. Using primary and secondary sources we explore the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that produced change and transformation in the lives of African American women. Through history, fiction, autobiography, art, religion, film, music, and cultural criticism we discuss and explore the construction of African American women’s activism and feminism; the racial politics of the body, beauty, and complexion; hetero- and same-sex sexualities; intraracial class relations; and the politics of identity, family, and work. M 1:30–3:20

AMST 708b/AFAM 705b/ENGL 708b/HIST 708b/HSHM 729b, The History of Race  Greta LaFleur

This course offers a broad survey of the history of racial science and racialist thinking in the Atlantic world from the early modern period through the late nineteenth century. Rather than attempting to detail the histories of specific racial formations (such as blackness or whiteness), the course tracks the intellectual history of the emergence of “race” as a specific category of human differentiation and traces a swath of its most muscular—and pernicious—permutations through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. W 1:30–3:20

AMST 710bU/AFAM 588bU/ENGL 948bU, Autobiography in America Robert Stepto

A study of autobiographical writings from Mary Rowlandson’s Indian captivity narrative (1682) to the present. Classic forms such as immigrant, education, and cause narratives; prevailing autobiographical strategies involving place, work, and photographs. Authors include Franklin, Douglass, Jacobs, Antin, Kingston, Uchida, Balakian, Als, and Karr. M 1:30–3:20

AMST 715a/AFAM 764a/HIST 715a, Readings in Nineteenth-Century America  David Blight

The course explores recent trends and historiography on several problems through the middle of the nineteenth century: sectionalism, expansion; slavery and the Old South; northern society and reform movements; Civil War causation; the meaning of the Confederacy; why the North won the Civil War; the political, constitutional, and social meanings of emancipation and Reconstruction; violence in Reconstruction society; the relationships between social/cultural and military/political history; problems in historical memory; the tension between narrative and analytical history writing; and the ways in which race and gender have reshaped research and interpretive agendas. W 1:30–3:20

AMST 717a/HIST 783a, Readings in Transnational History Jenifer Van Vleck

Readings in historiography after the “transnational turn”—the project of writing and teaching history across national boundaries. Emphasis on methods, especially research strategies and interpretive frameworks. Topics of readings and discussions include empire, colonialism, and postcolonialism; nations and nationalisms; borders and borderlands; globalization; cultural transfer and hybridity; and transnational approaches to histories of race, gender, and sexuality. M 1:30–3:20

AMST 719b/RLST 703b, Interrogating the Crisis of Islam Zareena Grewal

In official and unofficial discourses in the United States, diagnoses of Islam’s various “crises” are ubiquitous, and Muslim “hearts and minds” are viewed as the “other” front in the War on Terror. Since 9/11, the U.S. State Department has made the reform of Islam an explicit national interest, pouring billions of dollars into USAID projects in Muslim-majority countries, initiating curriculum development programs for madrasas in South Asia, and establishing the Arabic Radio Sawa and the satellite TV station Al-Hurra to propagate the U.S. administration’s political views as well as what it terms a “liberal” strain of Islam. Muslim Americans are also consumed by debates about the “crisis” of Islam, a crisis of religious authority in which the nature and rapidity of change in the measures of authority are felt to be too difficult to assimilate. This course maps out the various and deeply politically charged contemporary debates about the “crisis of Islam” and the question of Islamic reform through an examination of official U.S. policy, transnational pulp Islamic literature, fatwas and essays authored by internationally renowned Muslim jurists and scholars, and historical and ethnographic works that take up the category of crisis as an interpretive device. M 1:30–3:20

AMST 729bU/WGSS 746bU, Visual Kinship: Photography and the Idea of Family  Laura Wexler, Thy Phu

Family photography is often understood simply as snapshots of domestic scenes taken by amateur photographers. Yet family photographs are more complex than we think: they can also include images taken by a wide spectrum of producers, including the press and the state; they frequently circulate between private and public spheres, linking personal memories with national and even global histories; and, just as importantly, they help to shape the very idea of family itself, one that is frequently racialized and gendered. This course explores the relationship between family photography and the concept of family, from the age of analog to the digital era, from snapshots to portraits, from instrumental images to art exhibitions, and more. We look closely at family photographs held in special collections at the Beinecke Library, the Museum of Modern Art, the Library of Congress, and the National Archive and Records Administration, among other sites. Bringing these photographs in dialogue with critical writings drawn from photography studies and cultural history, we investigate the ways in which visual kinship is shaped, and how this process mediates the idea of family. T 10:30–12:30

AMST 735a/AFAM 514a/ENGL 950a, A Sound Theory of Blackness: African American Literature and Music in High Fidelity Daphne Brooks

An exploration of sonic theory and the African American literary tradition from the nineteenth century through the millennium with special emphasis on major debates in jazz studies and a critical (re)examination of blues ideologies, as well as the politics and poetics of spirituals, R&B and soul, funk, Afrofuturism, punk, pop, and hip-hop. The course places the work of a range of cultural theorists (Douglass, Du Bois, Adorno, Hurston, Ellison, Murray, Baraka, Mackey, Carby, Spillers, O’Meally, Griffin, Moten, Edwards, Radano, Nancy, Szendy, Perry, Weheliye, etc.) in conversation with key texts and epochs in black letters. T 1:30–3:20

AMST 736b/HSAR 725b, An Introduction to American Material Culture  Edward Cooke, Jr.

The field of material culture has drawn from a number of different disciplines and scholarly traditions. Through readings and applications of methodologies ranging from structuralism and semiotics to Marxist criticism and cultural studies, this seminar provides a solid foundation for the interpretation of artifacts.

AMST 741a/HIST 752a, Indians and Empires Ned Blackhawk

This course explores recent scholarship on Indian-imperial relations throughout North American colonial spheres from roughly 1500 to 1900. It examines indigenous responses to Spanish, Dutch, French, English, and lastly American and Canadian colonialism and interrogates commonplace periodization and geographic and conceptual approaches to American historiography. It concludes with an examination of American Indian political history, contextualizing it within larger assessments of Indian-imperial and Indian-state relations. T 7–8:50

AMST 744a/F&ES 617a/HIST 744a/HSHM 747a, Readings and Research in Energy History Paul Sabin

The history of energy in the United States and the world. Readings and discussion range widely across different forms of energy: animal power, biomass, and early hydropower; coal, oil, and atomic energy; and present-day hydraulic fracturing, wind, and solar. Themes include relations between energy producers and communities, including resistance to energy projects; cultural and social change associated with dominant energy regimes; labor struggles and environmental transformations; the global quest for oil; and changing national energy policies. We explore new approaches to writing and teaching the history of energy. Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor. M 1:30–3:20

AMST 749a/HSAR 733a, Material Culture of the Colonial Americas (South and North) Edward Cooke, Jr.

This seminar explores the material culture created and used during the period of the European colonization of North and South America. The intent and priorities of Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, English, and German settlers in the period 1500–1800 are explored and contrasted. In looking at the entire colonial period, the course explores the effects of colonial policies on importation and local production, the impact of imported objects and immigrant craftsmen upon local craft structures, the extent of trade and mobility within the colonies, and the movement of raw materials within a global economy. Close analysis of indigenous cultures, the uneven impact of various European powers, and the different market levels in the New World contribute to a more nuanced understanding of cultural transfer, adaptation, imposition, emulation, imitation, and hybridity. The result is a deeper sense of the meaning of objects within empire, and the agency of the colonial craftsmen. Ceramics, glass, textiles, and base metals reveal the vast trade networks that linked the various colonies. On the other hand, furniture, and some textiles often borrowed from European conventions but were translated into local materials wrought by local modes of workmanship. W 10:30–12:20

AMST 768a/HIST 768a, Asian American History and Historiography Mary Lui

This reading and discussion seminar examines Asian American history through a selection of recently published texts and established works that have significantly shaped the field. Major topics include the racial formation of Asian Americans in U.S. culture, politics, and law; U.S. imperialism; U.S. capitalist development and Asian labor migration; and transnational and local ethnic community formations. The class considers both the political and academic roots of the field as well as its evolving relationship to “mainstream” American history. TH 9:25–11:15

AMST 771a/AFAM 775a/ENGL 981a, Affect Theory Tavia Nyong’o

This seminar traces the emergence of affect, sense, feeling, and mood as critical keywords in American studies. Particular attention is paid to the manner in which queer theorists such as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Lauren Berlant, Ann Cvetkovich, Heather Love, Jennifer Doyle, Jonathan Flatley, and José Esteban Muñoz developed the concept in what has been called “the affective turn” in queer and feminist aesthetics. The philosophical basis of affect theory in the writings of Spinoza, Heidegger, and Deleuze form the core of the seminar. We also look to an alternate genealogy for affect politics in the writings of Bergson and Deleuze on fabulation. We consider the psychoanalytic take on affect, in particular the object relations school of Klein and Winnicott, and we read critics who contrast affect theory with trauma theory. Marxist contributions to affect theory include readings from Virno (on humor), Hardt and Negri (on affective labor), and Rancière (on the distribution of the sensible). The writings of Jasbir Puar and Brian Massumi on the affective politics of contemporary war, empire, and societies of control are also considered, as are writings by Fred Moten, Saidiya Hartman, and Frank Wilderson on optimism and pessimism as moods/modalities of black studies. M 1:30–3:20

AMST 775bU/ENGL 838bU, Performing American Literature Wai Chee Dimock

A broad selection of short stories, poems, and novels, accompanied by class performances throughout the term, culminating in a term project with a significant writing component. “Performance” here includes a wide range of activities, from staging to the making of videos and films, digital game design, and the creative use of social media. Readings include poetry by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Claudia Rankine; fiction by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Junot Díaz. W 1:30–3:20

AMST 778aU , Global Cities: New York, Chicago, San Francisco Wai Chee Dimock

This course explores the vibrant openness of three cities through an in-depth study of the geographies invoked, the literary genres experimented with, the sights and sounds produced, the collective pasts recalled, and the collective futures intimated. Beginning with Upton Sinclair’s immigrant labor force in The Jungle, and ending with Teju Cole’s interweaving of Africa, Europe, and America in Open City, we also read the detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett; the science fiction of Philip K. Dick; the generational sagas of Julia Alvarez, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Amy Tan; and theoretical works by Judith Butler, Michel de Certeau, and Fredric Jameson.

AMST 780b/HIST 734b, Class and Capitalism in Twentieth-Century United States  Jennifer Klein

Reading course on class formation, labor, and political economy in the twentieth-century United States; how regionalism, race, and class power shaped development of American capitalism. The course reconsiders the relationships between economic structure and American politics and political ideologies, and between global and domestic political economy. Readings include primary texts and secondary literature (social, intellectual, and political history; geography). W 3:30–5:20

AMST 789a, Social Theory of the City Laura Barraclough

This reading-intensive course considers how scholars from a variety of disciplines have constructed and conceptualized the city, with particular attention to the role of the urban setting as both product and producer of social relations of power. Students examine the historiography of urban theory, including both classical and contemporary approaches. Readings draw from a variety of theoretical formations including but not limited to urban ecology, political economy, neoliberal urbanism, critical race theory, feminism, queer theory, and more. A primary aim of the course is to trouble the spatial, temporal, and conceptual bounds of what qualifies as urban, and to consider how alternative ways of imagining the city can and do support a range of political agendas and social movements. W 9:25–11:15

AMST 797a/AFAM 797a/HIST 797a, Atlantic Abolitions Marcela Echeverri, Edward Rugemer

This readings course explores the historiography on the century of abolition, when the new states of the Americas abolished racial slavery. Beginning with the first abolitions in the U.S. North during the 1780s, we consider the emergence and process of abolition throughout the Atlantic world, including the Caribbean, Spanish America, and Brazil, through the 1880s. TH 9:25–11:15

AMST 801a/HIST 730a, U.S. Intellectual Formations in the Twentieth Century  Jean-Christophe Agnew

This seminar introduces students to recent works on some of the more important intellectual movements in twentieth-century U.S. history and explores the widely different contextualist approaches that historians have taken toward them. Our first set of questions focuses on the intellectuals as a social type or formation: How did they mobilize themselves and others differently over the course of the century as the institutional ground shifted beneath their feet, the culture industries multiplied, and the communication revolution unfolded? How should we understand the real and imagined spaces that intellectuals fashioned for themselves and the impact of those geographies upon their identities and ideas? What effects have the changing forms of intellectual collaboration had on the genesis, refinement, and articulation of ideas in this country? Our second set of questions focuses on some of the ideas, ideologies, paradigms, “imaginaries,” and intellectual identities that took hold over the course of the century, with a view toward comparing the different visions in relation to one another and against the circumstances of their efflorescence. One short and one long paper. T 1:30–3:20

AMST 802a/HIST 702a, Readings in Early National America Joanne Freeman

An introduction to the early national period and its scholarship, exploring major themes such as nationalism, national identity, the influence of the frontier, the structure of society, questions of race and gender, and the evolution of political cultures. T 1:30–3:20

AMST 803a/HIST 703a, Research in Early National America Joanne Freeman

A research seminar focused on the early national period of American history, broadly defined. Early weeks familiarize students with sources from the period and discuss research and writing strategies. Students produce a publishable article grounded in primary materials. W 9:25–11:15

AMST 804a/AFAM 802a/HIST 750a, Readings in African American History since 1865 Glenda Gilmore

Students read major secondary works alongside key primary sources on African American history from 1865 to the present. The course covers Reconstruction; the Jim Crow era; the Long Civil Rights Movement, including its classical phase; African American transnationalism; and urban, political, and labor history from the African American perspective. The course emphasizes gender and racial formation. Students read thematically within the course, make class presentations, and write a historiographical paper. W 1:30–3:20

AMST 805a/HSAR 720a/REL 966a/RLST 699a/WGSS 779a, Sensational Materialities: Sensory Cultures in History, Theory, and Method Sally Promey

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the sensory and material histories of (often religious) images, objects, buildings, and performances as well as the potential for the senses to spark contention in material practice. With a focus on American things and religions, the course also considers broader geographical and categorical parameters so as to invite intellectual engagement with the most challenging and decisive developments in relevant fields, including recent literatures on material agencies. The goal is to investigate possibilities for scholarly examination of a robust human sensorium of sound, taste, touch, scent, and sight—and even “sixth senses”—the points where the senses meet material things (and vice versa) in life and practice. Topics include the cultural construction of the senses and sensory hierarchies; investigation of the sensory capacities of things; and specific episodes of sensory contention in and among various religious traditions. In addition, the course invites thinking beyond the “Western” five senses to other locations and historical possibilities for identifying the dynamics of sensing human bodies in religious practices, experience, and ideas. The Sensory Cultures of Religion Research Group meets at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays; class participants are strongly encouraged, but not required, to attend. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor; qualified undergraduates are welcome. M 3:30–5:20

AMST 810a/WGSS 815a, American Public Sculpture: History, Context, and Continuing Significance Laura Wexler

Building on a new partnership between the Smithsonian Institution and Yale University, this course offers a broad-based and multidisciplinary exploration of public sculpture in the United States. Course work includes field trips and digital projects as well as readings in the scholarship of public memory, cultural heritage, conservation, and aesthetics.

AMST 814a/FILM 603a, Historical Methods in Film Study Charles Musser

A range of historiographic issues in film studies, including the roles of technology, exhibition, and spectatorship. Topics include intermediality and intertextuality. Consideration of a range of methodological approaches through a focus on international early cinema and American race cinema of the silent period. Particular attention to the interaction between scholars and archives. T 3:20–6:20

AMST 832aU and 833bU/FILM 735aU and 736bU, Documentary Film Workshop  Charles Musser

This workshop in audiovisual scholarship explores ways to present research through the moving image. Students work within a Public Humanities framework to make a documentary that draws on their disciplinary fields of study. Designed to fulfill requirements for the M.A. with a concentration in Public Humanities. W 12:30–3:20, screenings W 7–9

AMST 834bU/FILM 733bU, Documentary and the Environment Charles Musser

The environmental documentary has emerged as one of cinema’s most vital genres of the past ten years (in documentary, its only rivals are probably those concerned with the Second Gulf War). As the world’s environment faces a growing crisis, documentary has come to serve as a key means to draw public attention to specific issues. This course combines screenings with readings on documentary such as Bill Nichols’s important book Representing Reality. Often films have book tie-ins, and we consider how they complement each other and work together to maximize the impact of their message. Readings also focus on news items, debates, Web sites, and other media forms that are employed in conjunction with the films. T 1:30–3:20, screenings M 7

AMST 848b/ENGL 853b, Inventing the Environment in the Anthropocene  Michael Warner

Although the concept of the Anthropocene can be dated in various ways, two of the most important benchmarks seem to be the beginning of industrial production in the late eighteenth century and the uptick in carbon dioxide emissions from the mid-nineteenth century (petroleum came into use during the Civil War). The period between these two moments is also that in which the modern language of the environment took shape, from Cuvier’s discovery of extinction and Humboldt’s holistic earth science to the transformative work of Thoreau and George P. Marsh. This course shuttles between the contemporary debate about the significance and consequences of the Anthropocene and a reexamination of that environmental legacy. We look at the complexity of “nature,” beginning with the Bartrams, Jefferson, Cuvier, and the transatlantic literatures of natural history; georgics and other genres of nature writing; natural theology; ambiguities of pastoral in American romantic writing (Bryant, mainly); the impact of Humboldt (Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman); westward expansion and Native American writing about land; Hudson School painting and landscape architecture. We also think about the country/city polarity and the development of “grid” consciousness in places like New York City. One aim is to assess the formation and legacy of key ideas in environmentalism, some of which may now be a hindrance as much as a foundation. Secondary readings from Leo Marx, Henry Nash Smith, and William Cronon, as well as more recent attempts to reconceive environmental history (Joachim Radkau), ecocriticism (Lawrence Buell), and related fields, as well as science journalism (Elizabeth Kolbert). We attend and discuss Dipesh Chakrabarty’s Tanner lectures in February. Students are invited to explore a wide range of research projects; and one assignment is to devise a teaching unit for an undergraduate class on the same topic. TH 1:30–3:20

AMST 866a/HIST 775a/WGSS 712a, Readings in the History of Sexuality  Joanne Meyerowitz

Selected topics in the history of sexuality. Emphasis on key theoretical works and recent historical literature. W 3:30–5:20

AMST 878a/HIST 930a/HSHM 701a, Problems in the History of Medicine and Public Health John Harley Warner

An examination of the variety of approaches to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of medicine, focusing on the United States. Reading and discussion of the recent scholarly literature on medical cultures, public health, and illness experiences from the early national period through the present. Topics include the role of gender, class, ethnicity, race, religion, and region in the experience of health care and sickness and in the construction of medical knowledge; the interplay between lay and professional understandings of the body; the role of the marketplace in shaping professional identities and patient expectations; citizenship, nationalism, and imperialism; and the visual cultures of medicine. W 1:30–3:20

AMST 880a/AFAM 616a/WGSS 616a, Imagined Futures: Species Being, Biotechnologies, and Planetary Relations In Literature, Art, and Music  Hazel Carby

This course interrogates the premises of speculative fiction alongside the futuristic compositions of visual artists and musicians. The theoretical and historical frameworks of the course are shaped by a deep engagement with questions of the possibilities and limits of the human, addressing theoretical and imaginative questions of species being, hybridity, genders and sexualities, racialization, and relationships between biology, technology, and the body. Readings in cultural and postcolonial theory provide an important lens into this material, and students are asked to consider how colonial and imperial pasts and presents inform future imaginings or provide the motivation for creative artists to envision alternative futures. T 2:30–4:30

AMST 900, Independent Research

AMST 901, Directed Reading

AMST 902a and b, Prospectus Workshop

Upon completion of course work, students are required to participate in at least one term of the prospectus workshop, ideally the term before the prospectus colloquium is held. Open to all students in the program and joint departments, the workshop serves as a forum for discussing the selection of a dissertation topic, refining a project’s scope, organizing research materials, and evaluating work in progress. The workshop meets once a month. M 12–1:30

AMST 903aU/HIST 746a, Introduction to Public Humanities Ryan Brasseaux

What is the relationship between knowledge produced in the university and the circulation of ideas among a broader public, between academic expertise on the one hand and nonprofessionalized ways of knowing and thinking on the other? What is possible? This seminar provides an introduction to various institutional relations and to the modes of inquiry, interpretation, and presentation by which practitioners in the humanities seek to invigorate the flow of information and ideas among a public more broadly conceived than the academy, its classrooms, and its exclusive readership of specialists. Topics include public history, museum studies, oral and community history, public art, documentary film and photography, public writing and educational outreach, the socially conscious performing arts, and fundraising. In addition to core readings and discussions, the seminar includes presentations by several practitioners who are currently engaged in different aspects of the Public Humanities. With the help of Yale faculty and affiliated institutions, participants collaborate in developing and executing a Public Humanities project of their own definition and design. Possibilities might include, but are not limited to, an exhibit or installation, a documentary, a set of walking tours, a Web site, a documents collection for use in public schools. Required for the M.A. with a concentration in Public Humanities. TH 1:30–3:20

AMST 904, Practicum in Public Humanities

AMST 905, Master’s Project in Public Humanities

AMST 906a/WGSS 901a, (En)visualizing Knowledge: Text Mining, Mapping, Network Analysis, and Big Data Laura Wexler

Digital media and technology have opened an epochal chasm in our ways of knowing, as books, newspapers, libraries, whole universities, and worlds of scholarship are pulled into the digital realm only to reemerge in different forms. Many scholars have begun to explore how this new convergence alters knowledge production, visual culture, theories of representation and visuality, and the many and varied practices of everyday life. Text mining, mapping, network analysis, and big data visualization are among the most powerful forces now manifesting the everyday life world of the globe. This seminar examines these changes and convergences, investigating the legal, philosophical, scientific, artistic, and social implications of the new modes of creation and transmission of knowledge. Alongside such investigations, we examine existing projects in digital humanities and learn new tools and techniques for research in digital humanities. Students work individually and collaboratively to generate knowledge that can be demonstrated in a final term project. M 4:30–6:30

AMST 910a/AFAM 716a/HIST 764a, Working Group on Latina/o Studies I  Stephen Pitti, Alicia Schmidt Camacho

A continuous workshop for graduate students in American Studies, History, African American Studies, and related fields. This group devotes the fall term to intensive reading and discussion of important interdisciplinary texts in Latina/o studies. Students interested in participating should contact stephen.pitti@yale.edu. F 9:25–11:15

AMST 911b/AFAM 718b/HIST 765b, Working Group on Latina/o Studies II  Stephen Pitti, Alicia Schmidt Camacho

A continuous workshop for graduate students in American Studies, History, African American Studies, and related fields. The spring term focuses on the development of individual research projects and on public history work with the Smithsonian Museums and organizations in New Haven. Students interested in participating should contact stephen.pitti@yale.edu. F 9:25–11:15

AMST 935a,b/ANTH 931a,b, Working Group on Ethnography and Oral History I and II Kathryn Dudley

A continuous workshop for advanced graduate students in Anthropology and American Studies. We discuss fieldwork experiences, analyze recordings of interviews, and share writing in progress to gather feedback and improve techniques. We attend to the methodological, representational, and ethical problems that arise in oral history and ethnography and examine critical theoretical frameworks for understanding our work as collaborative knowledge production. Since 2000, group members’ research has shared several themes: a commitment to experimental representational methods; the importance of space, affect, and materiality to ethnographic and historical analysis; and field sites that explore post­industrial economies in the United States and other areas of the world. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. One-half credit; meets every other week. T 1:30–3:20

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Anthropology

10 Sachem Street, 203.432.3670

http://anthropology.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Anne Underhill

Director of Graduate Studies

David Watts

Professors Richard Bribiescas, Richard Burger (on leave [Sp]), Michael Dove (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Kathryn Dudley (American Studies), J. Joseph Errington (on leave [Sp]), Eduardo Fernandez-Duque, Inderpal Grewal (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Marcia Inhorn (Middle East Studies; on leave [Sp]), William Kelly (on leave [Sp]), Paul Kockelman, Roderick McIntosh, Catherine Panter-Brick, Eric Sargis, James Scott (Political Science), Helen Siu, Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan (on leave [F]), Anne Underhill, Claudia Valeggia, David Watts

Associate Professors Erik Harms, William Honeychurch (on leave [F]), Douglas Rogers (on leave [F])

Assistant Professors Oswaldo Chinchilla, Narges Erami (Middle East Studies), Louisa Lombard (on leave [Sp]), Brian Wood

Fields of Study

The department covers three subfields: archaeology; sociocultural and linguistic anthropology; and physical anthropology. Archaeology focuses on ritual complexes and writing, ceramic analysis, warfare, ancient civilizations, origins of agriculture, and museum studies. Sociocultural anthropology provides a range of courses: classics in ethnography and social theory, religion, myth and ritual, kinship and descent, historical anthropology, culture and political economy, agrarian studies, ecology, environment and social change, medical anthropology, emotions, public health, sexual meanings and gender, postcolonial development, ethnicity, identity politics and diaspora, urban anthropology, global mass culture, and alternate modernity. Linguistic anthropology includes language, nationalism and ideology, structuralism and semiotics, and feminist discourse. Physical anthropology focuses on paleoanthropology, evolutionary theory, human functional anatomy, race and human biological diversity, and primate ecology. There is strong geographical coverage in Africa, the Caribbean, East Asia (China and Japan), Latin America and South America, Southeast Asia (Indonesia), South Asia and the Indian Ocean, the Near East, Europe, and the United States.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

There are no required courses or seminars for archaeology and biological anthropology graduate students. However, graduate students in these subfields are expected to confer closely with their primary adviser and faculty to develop the most enriching and cogent program of courses. In sociocultural anthropology, more than three-fourths of a student’s program consists of electives, including course work in other departments. Sociocultural students must take six required courses, with the remainder being electives among Anthropology courses and other departments. Admission to Ph.D. candidacy requires (1) completion of two years of course work (sixteen term courses); (2) independent study and research; (3) satisfactory performance on qualifying examinations; and (4) a dissertation research proposal submitted and approved before the end of the third year. For sociocultural anthropology students, the research proposal requirement takes the form of a field paper of approximately eighty pages in length. Qualifying examinations are normally taken at the end of the second year. For archaeology and biological anthropology subfields, they consist of eight hours written (four hours on one of the subfields, four hours on the student’s special interest), and two hours oral. The sociocultural anthropology exam consists of five hours written and approximately one hour oral and is based on the six required courses.

Because of the diversity of our students’ training program, the Department does not have a general foreign language requirement, either for admission or for admission to Ph.D. candidacy. Rather, each student’s advisory committee must determine the necessary level and nature of foreign language proficiency (including scholarly languages and languages to be used in field research) to be met by the student, as well as any required competencies in statistics and other quantitative or qualitative methods. Advisory committees will stipulate such requirements in writing to the director of graduate studies (DGS) at the earliest possible stage of the student’s program of study for approval by the DGS and the Department faculty. Such committee stipulations should specify exactly when and how it will be determined that the student has or has not met the requirements.

Combined Ph.D. Programs

The Anthropology department also offers a combined Ph.D. in Anthropology and Forestry & Environmental Studies in conjunction with the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and a combined Ph.D. in Anthropology and African American Studies in conjunction with the Department of African American Studies. These combined programs are ideal for students who intend to concentrate in, and to write dissertations on, thematic and theoretical issues centrally concerned with anthropology and one of these other areas of study. Students in the combined degree programs will be subject to the combined supervision of faculty members in the Anthropology department and in the respective department or school.

Admission into the combined degree program in Anthropology and African American Studies is based on mutual agreement between these two departments. Individual students will develop courses of study in consultation with their academic advisers and with the directors of graduate study for both departments. Students in the program must take core courses in Anthropology and in African American Studies, plus related courses in both departments approved by their advisory committees. In addition, they must successfully complete the African American Studies third-year Research Workshop. Oral and written qualifying examinations must include two topics in the field of African American Studies and two topics in Anthropology. The examination committee must include at least one faculty member from each department. The dissertation prospectus must be submitted to the directors of graduate study of both departments and approved by the faculty of both. The thesis readers committee must also include at least one faculty member from each department, and the faculties of both departments must approve its composition.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.A. Applications for a terminal master’s degree are not accepted. The M.A. degree is awarded only to students not continuing in the Ph.D. program. The student must complete eight graduate-level term courses approved for credit in the Anthropology department and maintain an average grade of High Pass. Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.A.

Contact information: Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Anthropology, Yale University, PO Box 208277, New Haven CT 06520-8277; 203.432.3670; e-mail, anthropology@yale.edu; Web site, http://anthropology.yale.edu.

Courses

ANTH 500a, The Development of the Discipline: Historical Trajectories  William Kelly

The seminar emphasizes the characteristics of anthropology as a discipline and as a profession, and the historical trajectory of sociocultural anthropology from the late nineteenth century to the 1970s. The seminar is reserved for first-year doctoral students in Anthropology. M 9:25–11:15

ANTH 500b, The Development of the Discipline: Contemporary Themes  Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan

The major theoretical orientations in social and cultural anthropology (especially in the United States and Europe), their historical development and importance, their relation to one another and to other disciplines. The seminar is reserved for first-year doctoral students in Anthropology, and students are presumed to have taken ANTH 500a in the fall term. TH 9:25–11:15

ANTH 501a, Anthropology and Classical Social Theory Paul Kockelman

Readings of primary texts in classical social theory, especially the writings of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of these theorists in the early development of anthropology and social science more broadly. The course is reserved for first-year graduate students in Anthropology. M 9:25–11:15

ANTH 502a, Research in Sociocultural Anthropology: Design and Methods  Marcia Inhorn

The course offers critical evaluation of the nature of ethnographic research. Research design includes the rethinking of site, voice, and ethnographic authority. T 11:20–2

ANTH 515aU, Culture, History, Power, and Representation Helen Siu

This seminar is a critical introduction to anthropological formulations of the junctures of meaning, interest, and power. Readings include classical and contemporary ethnographies that are theoretically informed and historically situated. W 10:30–12:20

ANTH 528bU/ARCG 528bU/EGYP 528bU, Magic and Ritual in Ancient Egypt  John Darnell, Christina Geisen

Introduction to ancient Egyptian magic and rituals with an overview on the use of magic and discussion of the different rituals and festivals attested in ancient Egypt. T 1:30–3:20

ANTH 531b/ARCG 531b/CLSS 815b/CPLT 547b/HIST 502b/JDST 653b/NELC 533b/RLST 803b, Fakes, Forgeries, and the Making of Antiquity Eckart Frahm, Irene Peirano Garrison

A comparative exploration of notions of forgery and authenticity in the ancient and premodern world, in a variety of civilizations (ancient Greece, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, China, India, etc.) and different political, religious, literary, and artistic contexts. Emphasis is also placed on the pivotal role played by the “authentic” in the modern era in disciplines such as philology and aesthetics, the manipulative uses of ancient history for purposes of modern nation building and identity formation, copies and reconstructions of ancient artifacts, and the role of forgeries in today’s antiquities trade. TH 2:30–4:30

ANTH 533aU, Bilingualism in Social Context J. Joseph Errington

The linguistic phenomenon of bilingualism is presented through broad issues in social description inseparably linked to it: growth and change in bilingual communities; bilingual usage, social identity, and allegiance; and interactional significances of bilingual speech repertoire use. W 1:30–3:20

ANTH 539bU, Urban Ethnographies of Asia Erik Harms

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing. TH 9:25–11:15

ANTH 541a/F&ES 836a/HIST 965a/PLSC 779a, Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development Fabian Drixler, Peter Perdue, James Scott

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically grounded account of the transformations of rural society. Team-taught. W 1:30–5:20

ANTH 560aU, Representing Iran Narges Erami

This course introduces students to major themes in Iranian history and culture and builds a critical framework for understanding some of the challenges that face modern Iran today. In reading modern fiction, ethnography, historical narratives, primary sources, and theoretical texts covering local and oral history, revolutions, Islam and secularism, democracy and theocracy, and the role of cinema, students examine the Western production of knowledge about Iran and rethink what we know about such categories as history, culture, and gender. T 1:30–3:20

ANTH 561b/F&ES 877b, Anthropology of the Global Economy for Development and Conservation Carol Carpenter

The seminar explores topics in the anthropology of the global economy that are relevant to development and conservation policy and practice. Anthropologists are often assumed to focus on micro- or local-level research, and thus to have limited usefulness in the contemporary, global world of development and conservation policy. In fact, however, they have been examining global topics since at least the 1980s, and very little current anthropological research is limited to the village level. More importantly, the anthropological perspective on the global economy is unique and important. TH 9:30–12:20

ANTH 570bU, Anthropology of Information Paul Kockelman

This course is about the digital and computational mediation of meaning. In some sense, it is about human-based significance in relation to machine-based sieving. We read classic works in media studies, cybernetics, computer science, semiotics, anthropology, and critical theory. Key topics include the relation between meaning and information; the relation between interpretation and computation; and the relation between interaction and infrastructure. W 9:25–11:15

ANTH 571aU, Modern Indonesia J. Joseph Errington

Political and cultural dynamics in contemporary Indonesia explored from historical and anthropological perspectives. Major ethnic groups, key historical dynamics, political culture, and interaction between modernization and traditional lifeways. Issues of ethnicity, gender, religion, and economy in situations of rapid social change. W 1:30–3:20

ANTH 572b/F&ES 869b, Disaster, Degradation, Dystopia: Social Science Approaches to Environmental Perturbation and Change Michael Dove

An advanced seminar on the tradition of social science scholarship on environmental perception, perturbation, and disaster. The contents evolve from year to year in keeping with current scholarship. Section I, introduction. Section II, central questions and debates in the field: social dimensions of natural disasters; discursive dimensions of environmental degradation; asymmetries between political power and resource wealth; and anthropological approaches to the study of climate and society. Section III, historic and comparative view of different ways of understanding the environment: the twenty-first-century development of a posthumanist, multispecies ethnography; and the half-millennium tradition of natural history studies. Section IV, classroom presentation of work by the students and teaching fellow. One class is also devoted to student “picks” of the most influential works in the current literature, and there are two or three guest lectures by prominent scholars in the field. Prerequisite: ANTH 517a, 581a, or 597a.

ANTH 575aU, Hubs, Mobilities, and Global Cities Helen Siu

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations, class, gender, ethnicity, migration, and global landscapes of power and citizenship. T 1:30–3:20

ANTH 581a/F&ES 520a, Society and Environment: Introduction to Theory and Method Michael Dove

An introductory graduate core course on the scope of social scientific contributions to environmental and natural resource issues. Section I presents an overview of the field and course. Section II deals with the way that environmental problems are initially framed. Case studies focus on placing problems in their wider political context, new approaches to uncertainty and failure, and the importance of how the analytical boundaries to resource systems are drawn. Section III focuses on questions of method, including the dynamics of working within development projects, and the art of rapid appraisal and short-term consultancies. Section IV is concerned with local peoples and the environment, with case studies addressing myths of tropical forest use and abuse development discourse, and with the question of indigenous peoples and knowledge. This is a foundations course for the M.E.M. curriculum and a core course in the curriculum for the combined F&ES/Anthropology doctoral program. Three hours lecture/seminar. Enrollment limited to thirty.

ANTH 583aU/GLBL 823aU, Health Disparities and Health Equity: Biocultural Perspectives Catherine Panter-Brick

A biocultural perspective on debates in medical anthropology and global health that focus on health disparities and equity. The intersection of biological and cultural issues in matters of health research and intervention. Application of theoretical frameworks to case studies in global health inequality. W 3:30–5:20

ANTH 597a/F&ES 839a, Social Science of Conservation and Development  Carol Carpenter

This course is designed to provide M.E.M., M.E.Sc., and doctoral students with the opportunity to master the essential social science literature on sustainable development and conservation. Social science makes two contributions to the practice of development and conservation. First, it provides ways of thinking about, researching, and working with social groupings—including rural households and communities, but also development and conservation institutions, states, and NGOs. This aspect includes relations between groups at all these levels, and the role of power in these relations. Second, social science tackles the analysis of the knowledge systems that implicitly shape development and conservation policy and impinge on practice. In other words, we analyze communities but also our own ideas of what communities are. We also examine our ideas about sustainable development and conservation, and we look at development and the institutions that implement it from the perspective of communities. The emphasis throughout is on how these things shape the practice of sustainable development and conservation. Case studies used in the course have been balanced as much as possible between Southeast Asia, South Asia, Africa, and Latin America; most are rural and Third World (largely due to the development and conservation focus). The course includes readings from all noneconomic social sciences. Readings are equally focused on conservation and development. The goal of the course is to stimulate students to apply informed and critical thinking (which means not criticizing others, but questioning our own underlying assumptions) to whatever roles they may come to play in sustainable development and conservation, in order to move toward more environmentally and socially sustainable projects and policies. The course is also designed to help students shape future research by learning to ask questions that build on, but are unanswered by, the social science theory of conservation and development. No prerequisites. This is a requirement for the joint F&ES/Anthropology doctoral program and a prerequisite for some advanced F&ES courses. Open to advanced undergraduates. Three hours lecture/seminar. T 2:30–5:20

ANTH 598b/F&ES 965b, Advanced Readings: Social Science of Conservation and Development Carol Carpenter

An advanced seminar on the social science theory of sustainable development and conservation, designed as an M.E.M. capstone course and to give M.E.Sc. and doctoral students a wider theoretical context for analyzing and writing up their research. The course traces the conceptual history of the social science theory of sustainable development and conservation, focusing on theories of power, governmentality, and capitalism. It examines relations between these theories, alternative theories, and how this history influences the field. The course covers the works of Michel Foucault most relevant to development and conservation, important social scientists who have used Foucault’s ideas (e.g., James Ferguson, Timothy Mitchell, Tania Li, Donald Moore, David Mosse), alternative theories of power (e.g., James Scott, Bruno Latour), applications of Foucault’s ideas to development (selections change every year), applications of Foucault’s ideas to the environment (especially Arun Agrawal, Timothy Luke, Bruce Braun), theories of resistance (Michel Foucault, James Scott), and Foucault-influenced views of the economy and capitalism (Mitchell, Ferguson, Aiwa Ong, Li, Anna Tsing, among others). Students are expected to use the course to develop, and present in class, their own research and writing. Prerequisite: ANTH 561b, 582a, or 597a. Enrollment limited to twelve. T 2:30–5:20

ANTH 601bU, Meaning and Materiality Paul Kockelman

This course is about the relation between meaning and materiality. We read classic work at the intersection of biosemiosis, technocognition, and sociogenesis. And we use these readings to understand the relation between significance, selection, sieving, and serendipity. M 9:25–11:15

ANTH 638bU, Culture, Power, Oil Douglas Rogers

The course analyzes the production, circulation, and consumption of petroleum in order to explore key topics in recent social and cultural theory, including globalization, empire, cultural performance, natural resource extraction, and the nature of the state. Case studies from the United States, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Venezuela, and the former Soviet Union, among others. W 9:25–11:15

ANTH 639aU/AFST 639aU, Political Anthropology and Africa Louisa Lombard

A historical-anthropological study of politics in Africa. How have anthropologists made sense of the workings of African politics, both those of state and nonstate actors? This course charts how African states came into being, how they operate, and how state agents and the people they govern negotiate legitimacy, authority, and belonging. W 3:30–5:20

ANTH 651aU/WGSS 651aU, Intersectionality and Women’s Health Marcia Inhorn

This interdisciplinary seminar explores how the intersections of race, class, gender, and other axes of “difference” (age, sexual orientation, disability status, nation, religion) affect women’s health, primarily in the contemporary United States. Recent feminist approaches to intersectionality and multiplicity of oppressions theory are introduced. In addition, the course demonstrates how anthropologists studying women’s health issues have contributed to social and feminist theory at the intersections of race, class, and gender. T 9:25–11:15

ANTH 710b/ARCG 710b, Settlement Patterns and Landscape Archaeology  Oswaldo Chinchilla

An introduction to the archaeological study of ancient settlements and landscapes. Topics include an overview of method and theory in settlement and landscape archaeology; field methods of reconnaissance, survey, and remote sensing; studies of households and communities; studies of ancient agricultural landscapes; regional patterns; roads and networks of communication; urbanism and ancient cities; and symbolic interpretations of ancient landscapes. T 9:25–11:15

ANTH 717aU/ARCG 717aU, Ancient Maya Writing Oswaldo Chinchilla

Introduction to the ancient Maya writing system. Contents of the extant corpus, including nametags, royal and ritual commemorations, dynastic and political subjects, and religious and augural subjects; principles and methods of decipherment; overview of the Maya calendar; comparison with related writing systems in Mesoamerica and elsewhere in the ancient world. TH 9:25–11:15

ANTH 720bU/ARCG 720bU/NELC 720bU, Babylon to Bush Harvey Weiss

Analysis of Mesopotamian transformations from the earliest agriculture villages to the earliest cities, states, and civilization, to the earliest empires, as well as the region-wide collapses that punctuated these developments. Forces that drove these uniquely early Mesopotamian developments. Essential archaeological questions, including why each transformation happened, developed, and evolved. The end of the Ottoman empire and the British (1917) and American (1991, 2003) invasions. TH 1:30–3:20

ANTH 743b/ARCG 743b, Archaeological Research Design and Proposal Development  William Honeychurch

An effective proposal requires close consideration of all steps of research design, from statement of the problem to data analysis. The course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles by which archaeological research projects are devised and proposed. Students receive intensive training in the preparation of a research proposal with the expectation that the final proposal will be submitted to national and international granting agencies for consideration. The course is structured around the creation of research questions; hypothesis development and statement of expectations; and the explicit linking of expectations to material patterning, field methods, and data analysis. Students review and critique examples of funded and nonfunded research proposals and comment extensively on each other’s proposals. In addition to developing one’s own research, learning to constructively critique the work of colleagues is imperative for becoming a responsible anthropological archaeologist. F 9:25–11:15

ANTH 771a/ARCG 771a, Early Complex Societies Richard Burger, Roderick McIntosh

A consideration of theories and methods developed by archaeologists to recognize and understand complex societies in prehistory. Topics include the nature of social differentiation and stratification as applied in archaeological interpretation; emergence of complex societies in human history; case studies of societies known ethnographically and archaeologically. MW 9–10:15

ANTH 772aU/ARCG 772aU, Cities in Antiquity: The Archaeology of Urbanism  Anne Underhill, Oswaldo Chinchilla

Archaeological studies of ancient cities and urbanism. Topics include the origin and growth of cities; the economic, social, and political implications of urban life; and archaeological methods and theories for the study of ancient urbanism. Case studies include ancient cities around the world. T 9:25–11:15

ANTH 773bu/ARCG 773bu/F&ES 793b/NELC 588bu, Abrupt Climate Change and Societal Collapse Harvey Weiss

Collapse documented in the archaeological and early historical records of the Old and New Worlds, including Mesopotamia, Mesoamerica, the Andes, and Europe. Analysis of politicoeconomic vulnerabilities, resiliencies, and adaptations in the face of abrupt climate change, anthropogenic environmental degradation, resource depletion, “barbarian” incursions, or class conflict. Th 3:30–5:20

ANTH 779bU/ARCG 779bU, Anthropology of Mobile Societies  William Honeychurch

The social and cultural significance of the ways that hunter-gatherers, pastoral nomads, maritime traders, and members of our own society traverse space. The impact of mobility and transport technologies on subsistence, trade, interaction, and warfare from the first horse riders of five thousand years ago to jet-propulsion tourists of today. W 3:30–5:20

ANTH 782bU/ARCG 782bU, Advanced Archaeological Theory Roderick McIntosh

Review of the intellectual history of archaeology, with readings from the Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis on the tension between science, mysticism, and nationalism in the interpretation of prehistoric processes. W 7–8:50

ANTH 785aU/ARCG 785aU, Archaeological Ceramics I Anne Underhill

Ceramics are a rich source of information about a range of topics including ancient technology, cooking practices, craft specialization, regional trade, and religious beliefs. This course provides a foundation for investigating such topics and gaining practical experience in archaeological analysis of ceramics. Students have opportunities to focus on ceramics of particular interest to them, whether these are low-fired earthen wares, or porcelains. We discuss ancient pottery production and use made in diverse contexts ranging from households in villages to workshops in cities. In addition we refer to the abundant ethnoarchaeological data about traditional pottery production. TH 1:30–3:20

ANTH 787bU/ARCG 787bU/HSAR 804b, East Asian Objects and Museums: Collection, Curation, and Display Anne Underhill, Youn-mi Kim

This course explores the East Asian art and anthropological collections at Yale’s museums and at other major museums in North America and East Asia. Students study collections and their histories; gain experience in museum practices; and learn from specialists through class visits to other relevant museums in the United States and an associated international conference, Material Culture and Everyday Life before the Korean War: Workshop on the Korean Art and Photograph Collections at the Yale Peabody Museum, sponsored by the Council on East Asian Studies. Opportunities for a student-curated exhibition at Yale are being developed. W 9:25–11:15

ANTH 801a, Sexual Selection and Parental Investment Eduardo Fernandez-Duque

Critical evaluation of the current state of theory and empirical research on sexual selection and parental investment in evolutionary ecology through discussion of reviews and empirical studies. Evidence that sexual selection and parental investment have played and continue to play key roles in the evolution and maintenance of particular features of morphology, behavior, and social organization. T 1:30–3:20

ANTH 835bU/E&EB 842bU, Primate Diversity and Evolution Eric Sargis

The diversity and evolutionary history of living and extinct primates. Focus on major controversies in primate systematics and evolution, including the origins and relationships of several groups. Consideration of both morphological and molecular studies. Morphological diversity and adaptations explored through museum specimens and fossil casts. W 1:30–3:20

ANTH 847bU/ARCG 847bU, Hunter-Gatherers Brian Wood

The vast majority of the human experience centered around one way of making a living: hunting and gathering. Yet today, hunter-gatherers make up a small and diminishing proportion of human societies. This class is a broad survey of the ecology, economics, political, and social organization of recent hunter-gatherers and a review of anthropological inquiry into foraging societies. T 1:30–3:20

ANTH 857bU, Topics and Issues in Evolutionary Theory Eric Sargis, Brian Wood

Focus on classic and current literature in theoretical evolutionary biology, intended to give students intensive training in critical analysis of theoretical concepts and in scientific writing. W 1:30–3:20

ANTH 859b, Ethnopediatrics Claudia Valeggia

Cross-cultural study of the relation between biology and culture and its influence on children’s well-being. Ways in which the health, growth, and development of children are shaped by the interactions of human evolutionary biology, ecology, and local cultural patterns. TH 1:30–3:20

ANTH 864bU/ARCG 864bU, Human Osteology Eric Sargis

A lecture and laboratory course focusing on the characteristics of the human skeleton and its use in studies of functional morphology, paleodemography, and paleopathology. Laboratories familiarize students with skeletal parts; lectures focus on the nature of bone tissue, its biomechanical modification, sexing, aging, and interpretation of lesions. TTH 2:30–3:45

ANTH 876bU, Observing and Measuring Behavior Eduardo Fernandez-Duque

The primary subject matter of the course is the methods used for the systematic observation and measurement of the behavior of living organisms and the quantification and analyses of the information collected. T 9:25–11:15

ANTH 931a,b/AMST 935a,b, Working Group on Ethnography and Oral History I and II Kathryn Dudley

A continuous workshop for advanced graduate students in Anthropology and American Studies. We discuss fieldwork experiences, analyze recordings of interviews, and share writing in progress to gather feedback and improve techniques. We attend to the methodological, representational, and ethical problems that arise in oral history and ethnography and examine critical theoretical frameworks for understanding our work as collaborative knowledge production. Since 2000, group members’ research has shared several themes: a commitment to experimental representational methods; the importance of space, affect, and materiality to ethnographic and historical analysis; and field sites that explore post­industrial economies in the United States and other areas of the world. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. One-half credit; meets every other week. T 1:30–3:20

ANTH 950a and b, Directed Research: Preparation for Qualifying Exam

By arrangement with faculty.

ANTH 951a and b, Directed Research in Ethnology and Social Anthropology

By arrangement with faculty.

ANTH 952a and b, Directed Research in Linguistics

By arrangement with faculty.

ANTH 953a and b, Directed Research in Archaeology and Prehistory

By arrangement with faculty.

ANTH 954a and b, Directed Research in Biological Anthropology

By arrangement with faculty.



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Applied Mathematics

A. K. Watson Hall, 203.432.1278

http://applied.math.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Director of Graduate Studies

Peter Jones

Professors Andrew Barron (Statistics), Joseph Chang (Statistics), Ronald Coifman (Mathematics; Computer Science), Stanley Eisenstat (Computer Science), Michael Fischer (Computer Science), Peter Jones (Mathematics), David Pollard (Statistics), Nicholas Read (Physics; Applied Physics; Mathematics), Vladimir Rokhlin (Computer Science; Mathematics), Martin Schultz (Emeritus, Computer Science), Mitchell Smooke (Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science; Applied Physics), Daniel Spielman (Computer Science), Van Vu (Mathematics), Günter Wagner (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology), John Wettlaufer (Geology & Geophysics; Mathematics; Physics), Huibin Zhou (Statistics), Steven Zucker (Computer Science; Biomedical Engineering)

Associate Professors John Emerson (Statistics), Thierry Emonet (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology; Physics), Josephine Hoh (Public Health), Yuval Kluger (Pathology), Michael Krauthammer (Pathology), Sekhar Tatikonda (Electrical Engineering; Statistics; Computer Science)

Assistant Professors Xiuyuan Cheng, Alexander Cloninger, Manas Rachh, Guy Wolf

Fields of Study

The graduate Program in Applied Mathematics comprises the study and application of mathematics to problems motivated by a wide range of application domains. Areas of concentration include the analysis of data in very high-dimensional spaces, the geometry of information, computational biology, and randomized algorithms. Topics covered by the program include classical and modern applied harmonic analysis, linear and nonlinear partial differential equations, numerical analysis, scientific computing and applications, discrete algorithms, combinatorics and combinatorial optimization, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, discrete mathematics and applications, cryptography, statistical theory and applications, probability theory and applications, information theory, econometrics, financial mathematics, statistical computing, and applications of mathematical and computational techniques to fluid mechanics, combustion, and other scientific and engineering problems.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

All students are required to: (1) complete twelve term courses (including reading courses) at the graduate level, at least two with Honors grades; (2) pass a qualifying examination on their general applied mathematical knowledge (in algebra, analysis, and probability and statistics) by the end of their second year; (3) submit a dissertation prospectus; (4) participate in the instruction of undergraduates; (5) be in residence for at least three years; and (6) complete a dissertation that clearly advances understanding of the subject it considers. Prior to registering for a second year of study, and in addition to all other academic requirements, students must successfully complete MATH 991a, Ethical Conduct of Research, or another approved course on responsible conduct in research. Teaching is considered an integral part of training at Yale University, so all students are expected to complete two terms of teaching within their first two years. The normal time for completion of the Ph.D. program is four years.

Requirement (1) normally includes four core courses in each of the methods of applied analysis, numerical computation, algorithms, and probability; these should be taken during the first year. The qualifying examination is normally taken by the end of the third term and will test knowledge of the core courses as well as more specialized topics. The thesis is expected to be independent work, done under the guidance of an adviser. This adviser should be contacted not long after the student passes the qualifying examinations. A student is admitted to candidacy after completing requirements (1)–(5) and obtaining an adviser.

In addition to the above, all first-year students (including terminal M.S. students) must successfully complete one course on the responsible conduct of research (e.g., MATH 991 or CPSC 991) and AMTH 525, Seminar in Applied Mathematics.

Honors Requirement

Students must meet the Graduate School’s Honors requirement by the end of the fourth term of full-time study.

Master’s Degrees

M. Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) The M.S. degree is a terminal degree and is not awarded en route to the Ph.D. Students who withdraw from the Ph.D. program may be eligible for the M.S. if they meet the requirements of the terminal master’s degree program (below). Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.S.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program Students may also be admitted to a terminal master’s degree program directly. This program is normally completed in one year, but a part-time program may be spread over as many as four years. To qualify for the M.S., the student must pass ten graduate-level courses. Courses taken as part of the M.S. program must be preapproved by the director of graduate studies to ensure that a suitable distribution of topics is covered.

More information is available on the program’s Web site, http://applied.math.yale.edu.

Courses

AMTH 525, Seminar in Applied Mathematics

This course consists of weekly seminar talks given by a wide range of speakers. Required of all first-year students.

[AMTH 561a/CPSC 662a, Spectral Graph Theory]

[AMTH 562au/CPSC 562aU, Graphs and Networks]

AMTH 605a/ENAS 503a/STAT 667a, Probabilistic Networks, Algorithms, and Applications Sekhar Tatikonda

This course examines probabilistic and computational methods for the statistical modeling of complex data. The emphasis is on the unifying framework provided by graphical models, a formalism that merges aspects of graph theory and probability theory. Graphical models: Markov random fields, Bayesian networks, and factor graphs. Algorithms: filtering, smoothing, belief-propagation, sum-product, and junction tree. Variational techniques: mean-field and convex relaxations. Markov processes on graphs: MCMC, factored HMMs, and Glauber dynamics. Some statistical physics techniques: cavity and replica methods. Applications to error-correcting codes, computer vision, bio-informatics, and combinatorial optimization.

AMTH 666a/ASTR 666a/G&G 666a, Classical Statistical Thermodynamics  John Wettlaufer

Classical thermodynamics is derived from statistical thermodynamics. Using the multi­particle nature of physical systems, we derive ergodicity, the central limit theorem, and the elemental description of the second law of thermodynamics. We then develop kinetics, transport theory, and reciprocity from the linear thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Topics of focus include Onsager reciprocal relations, the Fokker-Planck equation, stability in the sense of Lyapunov, and time invariance symmetry. We explore phenomena that are of direct relevance to astrophysical and geophysical settings. No quantum mechanics is necessary as a prerequisite.

[AMTH 667b/CPSC 576bU/ENAS 576bU, Advanced Computational Vision]

AMTH 702a/MATH 702a, Numerical Solution of Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations Vladimir Rokhlin

This course includes (1) review of the classical qualitative theory of ODEs; (2) Cauchy problem: elementary numerical methods, stiff systems of ODEs, Richardson extrapolation and deferred corrections; (3) boundary value problems: elementary theory; (4) introduction to PDES: counterexamples, Cauchy-Kowalevski theorem, classification of second-order PDEs, separation of variables; (5) numerical methods for elliptic PDEs; (6) numerical methods for parabolic PDEs; and (7) numerical methods for hyperbolic PDEs. Prerequisites: advanced calculus; knowledge of FORTRAN or C.

AMTH 745b/CB&B 745b/CPSC 745b, Advanced Topics in Machine Learning and Data Mining Alexander Cloninger, Smita Krishnaswamy, Guy Wolf

An overview of advances in the past decade in machine learning and automatic data-mining approaches for dealing with the broad scope of modern data-analysis challenges, including deep learning, kernel methods, dictionary learning, and bag of words/features. This year, the focus is on a broad scope of biomedical data-analysis tasks, such as single-cell RNA sequencing, single-cell signaling and proteomic analysis, health care assessment, and medical diagnosis and treatment recommendations. The seminar is based on student presentations and discussions of recent prominent publications from leading journals and conferences in the field. Prerequisite: basic concepts in data analysis (e.g., CPSC 545 or 563) or permission of the instructor. W 2:30–5:15

AMTH 765b/CB&B 562b/ENAS 561b/INP 562b/MB&B 562bU/MCDB 562bU/PHYS 562b, Dynamical Systems in Biology Damon Clark, Jonathon Howard

This course covers advanced topics in computational biology. How do cells compute, how do they count and tell time, how do they oscillate and generate spatial patterns? Topics include time-dependent dynamics in regulatory, signal-transduction, and neuronal networks; fluctuations, growth, and form; mechanics of cell shape and motion; spatially heterogeneous processes; diffusion. This year, the course spends roughly half its time on mechanical systems at the cellular and tissue level, and half on models of neurons and neural systems in computational neuroscience. Prerequisite: MCDB 561a or equivalent, or a 200-level biology course, or permission of the instructor. TTH 2:30–3:45

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Applied Physics

Becton Center, 203.432.2210

http://appliedphysics.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Charles Ahn

Director of Graduate Studies

Hui Cao (309 BCT, hui.cao@yale.edu)

Professors Charles Ahn, Sean Barrett (Physics), Hui Cao, Richard Chang (Emeritus), Michel Devoret, Paul Fleury (Emeritus), Steven Girvin (Physics), Leonid Glazman (Physics), Victor Henrich, Sohrab Ismail-Beigi, Marshall Long (Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science), Tso-Ping Ma (Electrical Engineering), Simon Mochrie, Daniel Prober, Nicholas Read, Mark Reed (Electrical Engineering), Robert Schoelkopf, Ramamurti Shankar (Physics), Mitchell Smooke (Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science), A. Douglas Stone, Hongxing Tang (Electrical Engineering), Robert Wheeler (Emeritus), Werner Wolf (Emeritus)

Associate Professors Jack Harris (Physics), Corey O’Hern (Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science)

Assistant Professors Michael Choma (Biomedical Engineering), Liang Jiang, Owen Miller, Peter Rakich

Fields of Study

Fields include areas of theoretical and experimental condensed-matter and materials physics, optical and laser physics, quantum engineering, and nanoscale science. Specific programs include surface and interface science, first principles electronic structure methods, photonic materials and devices, complex oxides, magnetic and superconducting artificially engineered systems, quantum computing and superconducting device research, quantum transport and nanotube physics, quantum optics, and random lasers.

Special Admissions Requirements

The prerequisites for work toward a Ph.D. degree in Applied Physics include a sound undergraduate training in physics and a good mathematical background. The GRE General Test is required, and the Subject Test in Physics is strongly recommended.

Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology (PEB)

Students applying to the Ph.D. program in Applied Physics may also apply to be part of the PEB program. See the description under Non-Degree-Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes for course requirements, and http://peb.yale.edu for more information about the benefits of this program and application instructions.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

The student plans his/her course of study in consultation with faculty advisers (the student’s advisory committee). A minimum of twelve term courses is required. These courses must be full-credit graduate courses with clear technical, scientific, or mathematical focus. These twelve courses must include seven core courses. The first core course satisfies the math requirement; must be fulfilled in the first year; and is met by taking Mathematical Methods of Physics (PHYS 506a) (preferred), or, with permission of the DGS, Mathematical Methods I (APHY 500a). The remaining six core courses are Solid State Physics I (APHY 548a) and II (APHY 549b), Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS 508a) and II (PHYS 608b), Electromagnetic Theory I (PHYS 502b), and Statistical Physics I (PHYS 512b). It is expected that most of these six core courses will be taken in the first year; no more than two may be taken in the second year. No more than two of the twelve courses can be Special Investigations, and at least two must be outside the area of the dissertation.

Well-prepared students may be able to place out of the seven required core courses after demonstrating equivalent training and competence by passing an exam in the relevant subject.

Students must take Responsible Conduct in Research for Physical Scientists (APHY 590), which discusses ethics and responsible conduct in scientific research and fulfills the requirement stipulated by the National Science Foundation for all students and for all postdoctoral researchers funded by the NSF. Note that APHY 590 may not be used to fulfill the twelve-course requirement.

Each term, the faculty review the overall performance of the student and report their findings to the director of graduate studies (DGS), who determines whether the student may continue toward the Ph.D. degree. By the end of the second term, it is expected that a faculty member has agreed to accept the student as a research assistant. By December 5 of the third year, an area examination must be passed and a written prospectus submitted before dissertation research is begun. These events result in the student’s admission to candidacy. Subsequently, the student will report orally each year to the full advisory committee on progress. When the research is nearing completion, but before the thesis writing has commenced, the full advisory committee will advise the student on the thesis plan. A final oral presentation of the dissertation research is required to be given during term time.

There is no foreign language requirement.

Teaching experience is regarded as an integral part of the graduate training program at Yale University, and all Applied Physics graduate students are required to serve as a Teaching Fellow for one term, typically during year two. Teaching duties normally involve assisting in laboratories or discussion sections and grading papers and are not expected to require more than ten hours per week. Students are not permitted to teach during the first year of study. Students whose advisers experience disruption in funding may require additional support from Yale. In these cases, students will be required to teach for up to an additional two terms, but would not be required to teach more than three terms over their first five years.

If a student was admitted to the program having earned a score of less than 26 on the Speaking Section of the Internet-based TOEFL, the student will be required to take an English as a Second Language (ESL) course each term at Yale until the Graduate School’s Oral English Proficiency standard has been met. This must be achieved by the end of the third year in order for the student to remain in good standing.

Honors Requirement

Students must meet the Graduate School’s Honors requirement in at least two term courses (excluding Special Investigations) by the end of the second term of full-time study. An extension of one term may be granted at the discretion of the DGS.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) To qualify for the M.S., the student must pass eight term courses; no more than two may be Special Investigations. An average grade of at least High Pass is required, with at least one grade of Honors.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program Students may also be admitted directly to a terminal master’s degree program. The requirements are the same as for the M.S. en route to the Ph.D., although there are no core course requirements for students in this program. This program is normally completed in one year, but a part-time program may be spread over as many as four years. Some courses are available in the evening, to suit the needs of students from local industry.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, PO Box 208267, New Haven CT 06520-8267; e-mail, applied.physics@yale.edu; Web site, http://appliedphysics.yale.edu.

Courses

The list of courses may be slightly modified by the time the term begins. Please check the Web site http://students.yale.edu/oci for the most up-to-date course listing.

APHY 500a/ENAS 500a, Mathematical Methods I J. Rimas Vaisnys

A beginning, graduate-level introduction to ordinary and partial differential equations, vector analysis, linear algebra, and complex functions. Laplace transform, series expansion, Fourier transform, and matrix methods are given particular attention. Applications to problems frequently encountered in engineering practice are stressed throughout. TTH 9–10:15

APHY 506aU, Basic Quantum Mechanics Sohrab Ismail-Beigi

Basic concepts and techniques of quantum mechanics essential for solid state physics and quantum electronics. Topics include the Schrödinger treatment of the harmonic oscillator, atoms and molecules and tunneling, matrix methods, and perturbation theory. TTH 2:30–3:45

APHY 548au and 549bU/ENAS 850au and 851bu/PHYS 548au and 549bu, Solid State Physics I and II Victor Henrich [F], Michel Devoret [Sp]

A two-term sequence covering the principles underlying the electrical, thermal, magnetic, and optical properties of solids, including crystal structures, phonons, energy bands, semiconductors, Fermi surfaces, magnetic resonance, phase transitions, and superconductivity. Fall: TTH 1–2:15; Spring: TTh 1–2:15

APHY 590b/PHYS 590b, Responsible Conduct in Research for Physical Scientists

Required seminar for all first-year students.

[APHY 601b/PHYS 601b, Quantum Information and Computation]

APHY 610b/PHYS 610b, Quantum Many-Body Theory Leonid Glazman

Identical particles and second quantization. Electron tunneling and spectral function. General linear response theory. Approximate methods of quantum many-body theory. Dielectric response, screening of long-range interactions, electric conductance, collective modes, and photon absorption spectra. Fermi liquid; Cooper and Stoner instabilities; notions of superconductivity and magnetism. BCS theory, Josephson effect, and Majorana fermions in condensed matter; superconducting qubits. Bose-Einstein condensation; Bogoliubov quasiparticles and solitons. TTH 11:35–12:50

APHY 628a/PHYS 628a, Statistical Physics II Leonid Glazman

An advanced course in statistical mechanics. Topics may include mean field theory of and fluctuations at continuous phase transitions; critical phenomena, scaling, and introduction to the renormalization group ideas; topological phase transitions; dynamic correlation functions and linear response theory; quantum phase transitions; superfluid and superconducting phase transitions; cooperative phenomena in low-dimensional systems. TTH 2:30–3:45

[APHY 633b/PHYS 633b, Introduction to Superconductivity]

[APHY 634a/PHYS 634a, Mesoscopic Physics I]

[APHY 650a/PHYS 650a, Theory of Solids I]

APHY 675aU/PHYS 675aU, Principles of Optics with Applications Hui Cao

Introduction to the principles of optics and electromagnetic wave phenomena with applications to microscopy, optical fibers, laser spectroscopy, nanophotonics, plasmonics, and metamaterials. Topics include propagation of light, reflection and refraction, guiding light, polarization, interference, diffraction, scattering, Fourier optics, and optical coherence. TTH 11:35–12:50

APHY 676a/PHYS 676a, Introduction to Light-Matter Interactions Peter Rakich

Optical properties of materials and a variety of coherent light-matter interactions are explored through the classical and quantum treatments. The role of electronic, phononic, and plasmonic interactions in shaping the optical properties of materials is examined using generalized quantum and classical coupled-mode theories. The dynamic response of media to strain, magnetic, and electric fields is also treated. Modern topics are explored, including optical forces, photonic crystals, and metamaterials; multi-photon absorption; and parametric processes resulting from electronic, optomechanical, and Raman interactions. TTH 1–2:15

APHY 677a/PHYS 677a, Noise, Dissipation, Amplification, and Information  Michel Devoret

Graduate-level non-equilibrium statistical physics applied to noise phenomena, both classical and quantum. The aim of the course is to explain the fundamental link between the random fluctuations of a physical system in steady state and the response of the same system to an external perturbation. Several key examples in which noise appears as a resource rather than a limitation are treated: spin relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance (motional narrowing), Johnson-Nyquist noise in solid state transport physics (noise thermometry), photon correlation measurements in quantum optics (Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiment), and so on. The course explores both passive and active systems. It discusses the ultimate limits of amplifier sensitivity and speed in physics measurements. MW 9–10:15

[APHY 679b/PHYS 679b, Nonlinear Optics and Lasers]

APHY 691b/PHYS 691b, Quantum Optics Liang Jiang

Quantization of the electromagnetic field, coherence properties and representation of the electromagnetic field, quantum phenomena in simple nonlinear optics, atom-field interaction, stochastic methods, master equation, Fokker-Planck equation, Heisenberg-Langevin equation, input-output formulation, cavity quantum electrodynamics, quantum theory of laser, trapped ions, light forces, quantum optomechanics, Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum measurement and control. MW 9–10:15

APHY 725bU/ENAS 725bU, Advanced Synchrotron Techniques and Electron Spectroscopy of Materials Charles Ahn

This course provides descriptions of advanced concepts in synchrotron X-ray and electron-based methodologies for studies of a wide-range of materials at atomic and nano-scales. Topics include X-ray and electron interactions with matter, X-ray scattering and diffraction, X-ray spectroscopy and inelastic methods, time-resolved applications, X-ray imaging and microscopy, photo-electron spectroscopy, electron microscopy and spectroscopy, among others. Emphasis is on applying the fundamental knowledge of these advanced methodologies to real-world materials studies in a variety of scientific disciplines. T 1:30–3:20

[APHY 816a/PHYS 816a, Techniques of Microwave Measurements and RF Design]

APHY 990a and 990b, Special Investigations

[APHY 993a, Topics in DFT and First Principle Methods]

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Archaeological Studies

10 Sachem Street, 203.432.3670

www.yale.edu/archaeology

M.A.

Chair and Director of Graduate Studies

Richard Burger (Anthropology; on leave [Sp])

Acting Chair and Director of Graduate Studies [Sp]

William Honeychurch (Anthropology)

Professors Richard Burger (Anthropology; on leave [Sp]), Edward Cooke, Jr. (History of Art), John Darnell (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Stephen Davis (Religious Studies), Eckart Frahm (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Diana Kleiner (Classics; History of Art), Roderick McIntosh (Anthropology), J.G. Manning (Classics; History; on leave), Mary Miller (History of Art), Eric Sargis (Anthropology), Ronald Smith (Geology & Geophysics), Anne Underhill (Anthropology), Harvey Weiss (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations; on leave [F])

Associate Professors Milette Gaifman (History of Art; Classics), William Honeychurch (Anthropology; on leave [F])

Assistant Professors Oswaldo Chinchilla (Anthropology), Andrew Johnston (Classics; History)

Lecturers Thomas Fenn (Anthropology), Karen Foster (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations)

The aims of the program are to give students the academic background needed for careers in museums, cultural resource management, and teaching in community colleges and secondary schools. It also provides the opportunity for teachers, curators, and administrators to refresh themselves on recent developments in archaeology. In addition, the program allows some of our students to strengthen their background in archaeology before applying to Ph.D. programs. The program is administered by Yale’s Council on Archaeological Studies, with faculty from the departments of Anthropology, Classics, Geology & Geophysics, History, History of Art, Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations, and Religious Studies.

Special Admissions Requirements

The GRE General Test; an archaeology background is recommended but not required.

Special Requirements for the M.A. Degree

Courses are drawn from the graduate programs of the participating departments and from those undergraduate courses that are also open to graduate students. Eight courses are required. Unless previously taken for credit, these will include the archeological laboratory overview; at least one additional laboratory course; a course related to archaeology in two of the following three groups: (1) Anthropology; (2) Classics, History, History of Art, Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations, or Religious Studies; (3) Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Forestry & Environmental Studies, or Geology & Geophysics; and four electives. All students are required to participate in an approved summer field project. In addition, each student will write a master’s thesis. Degree candidates are required to pay a minimum of one year of full tuition. Full-time students can complete the course requirements in one academic year, and all students are expected to complete the program within a maximum period of three academic years.

For further information, visit the Archaeological Studies Web site, www.yale.edu/archaeology. Inquiries may be directed to Director of Graduate Studies, c/o Registrar, Archaeological Studies, Department of Anthropology, Yale University, PO Box 208277, New Haven CT 06520-8277, or via e-mail, cynthia.dreier@yale.edu.

Courses

ARCG 528bU/ANTH 528bU/EGYP 528bU, Magic and Ritual in Ancient Egypt  John Darnell, Christina Geisen

Introduction to ancient Egyptian magic and rituals with an overview on the use of magic and discussion of the different rituals and festivals attested in ancient Egypt. T 1:30–3:20

ARCG 531b/ANTH 531b/CLSS 815b/CPLT 547b/HIST 502b/JDST 653b/NELC 533b/RLST 803b, Fakes, Forgeries, and the Making of Antiquity Eckart Frahm, Irene Peirano Garrison

A comparative exploration of notions of forgery and authenticity in the ancient and premodern world, in a variety of civilizations (ancient Greece, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, China, India, etc.) and different political, religious, literary, and artistic contexts. Emphasis is also placed on the pivotal role played by the “authentic” in the modern era in disciplines such as philology and aesthetics, the manipulative uses of ancient history for purposes of modern nation building and identity formation, copies and reconstructions of ancient artifacts, and the role of forgeries in today’s antiquities trade. TH 2:30–4:30

ARCG 601b/RLST 601b, New Testament and Ancient Christianity: Early Christian Archaeology Stephen Davis

Required of doctoral students in New Testament studies and ancient Christianity. The topic and instructor change yearly. Topic for spring 2017 is early Christian archaeology. W 3:30–5:20

ARCG 710b/ANTH 710b, Settlement Patterns and Landscape Archaeology  Oswaldo Chinchilla

An introduction to the archaeological study of ancient settlements and landscapes. Topics include an overview of method and theory in settlement and landscape archaeology; field methods of reconnaissance, survey, and remote sensing; studies of households and communities; studies of ancient agricultural landscapes; regional patterns; roads and networks of communication; urbanism and ancient cities; and symbolic interpretations of ancient landscapes. T 9:25–11:15

ARCG 717aU/ANTH 717aU, Ancient Maya Writing Oswaldo Chinchilla

Introduction to the ancient Maya writing system. Contents of the extant corpus, including nametags, royal and ritual commemorations, dynastic and political subjects, and religious and augural subjects; principles and methods of decipherment; overview of the Maya calendar; comparison with related writing systems in Mesoamerica and elsewhere in the ancient world. TH 9:25–11:15

ARCG 720bU/ANTH 720bU/NELC 720bU, Babylon to Bush Harvey Weiss

Analysis of Mesopotamian transformations from the earliest agriculture villages to the earliest cities, states, and civilization, to the earliest empires, as well as the region-wide collapses that punctuated these developments. Forces that drove these uniquely early Mesopotamian developments. Essential archaeological questions, including why each transformation happened, developed, and evolved. The end of the Ottoman empire and the British (1917) and American (1991, 2003) invasions. TH 1:30–3:20

ARCG 743b/ANTH 743b, Archaeological Research Design and Proposal Development  William Honeychurch

An effective proposal requires close consideration of all steps of research design, from statement of the problem to data analysis. The course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles by which archaeological research projects are devised and proposed. Students receive intensive training in the preparation of a research proposal with the expectation that the final proposal will be submitted to national and international granting agencies for consideration. The course is structured around the creation of research questions; hypothesis development and statement of expectations; and the explicit linking of expectations to material patterning, field methods, and data analysis. Students review and critique examples of funded and nonfunded research proposals and comment extensively on each other’s proposals. In addition to developing one’s own research, learning to constructively critique the work of colleagues is imperative for becoming a responsible anthropological archaeologist. F 9:25–11:15

[ARCG 744bU/NELC 509bU, The Age of Akhenaton]

[ARCG 746aU/NELC 567aU, Ancient Civilizations of Nubia]

ARCG 749a/CLSS 846a/HSAR 570a, Becoming Hadrian: Autobiography and Art in the Second-Century A.D. Diana Kleiner

Marguerite Yourcenar’s famed fictional Memoirs of Hadrian serves as the starting point for an exploration of Hadrian and the art he commissioned in Rome and abroad. Hadrian’s passion for life, quest after peace, romantic wanderlust, veneration of Greek culture, and craving for love, along with his acceptance of death’s inexorableness, led him to commission some of Rome’s greatest monuments. The emperor’s flair for leadership and talent as an amateur architect inform student projects on the sculpture, mosaics, and buildings of the age, among them the portraiture of Hadrian’s lover Antinous, the Pantheon, and Hadrian’s Wall in Britain. Qualified undergraduates who have taken HSAR 250a and/or HSAR 252a may be admitted with permission of the instructor. T 1:30–3:20

ARCG 762bU/EMD 548b/F&ES 726b/G&G 562bU, Observing Earth from Space  Xuhui Lee

A practical introduction to satellite image analysis of Earth’s surface. Topics include the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, satellite-borne radiometers, data transmission and storage, computer image analysis, the merging of satellite imagery with GIS and applications to weather and climate, oceanography, surficial geology, ecology and epidemiology, forestry, agriculture, archaeology, and watershed management.

ARCG 771a/ANTH 771a, Early Complex Societies Richard Burger, Roderick McIntosh

A consideration of theories and methods developed by archaeologists to recognize and understand complex societies in prehistory. Topics include the nature of social differentiation and stratification as applied in archaeological interpretation; emergence of complex societies in human history; case studies of societies known ethnographically and archaeologically. MW 9–10:15

ARCG 772aU/ANTH 772aU, Cities in Antiquity: The Archaeology of Urbanism  Anne Underhill, Oswaldo Chinchilla

Archaeological studies of ancient cities and urbanism. Topics include the origin and growth of cities; the economic, social, and political implications of urban life; and archaeological methods and theories for the study of ancient urbanism. Case studies include ancient cities around the world. T 9:25–11:15

ARCG 773bu/ANTH 773bu/F&ES 793b/NELC 588bu, Abrupt Climate Change and Societal Collapse Harvey Weiss

Collapse documented in the archaeological and early historical records of the Old and New Worlds, including Mesopotamia, Mesoamerica, the Andes, and Europe. Analysis of politicoeconomic vulnerabilities, resiliencies, and adaptations in the face of abrupt climate change, anthropogenic environmental degradation, resource depletion, “barbarian” incursions, or class conflict. TH 3:30–5:20

ARCG 779bU/ANTH 779bU, Anthropology of Mobile Societies  William Honeychurch

The social and cultural significance of the ways that hunter-gatherers, pastoral nomads, maritime traders, and members of our own society traverse space. The impact of mobility and transport technologies on subsistence, trade, interaction, and warfare from the first horse riders of five thousand years ago to jet-propulsion tourists of today. W 3:30–5:20

ARCG 782bU/ANTH 782bU, Advanced Archaeological Theory Roderick McIntosh

Review of the intellectual history of archaeology, with readings from the Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis on the tension between science, mysticism, and nationalism in the interpretation of prehistoric processes. W 7–8:50

ARCG 785aU/ANTH 785aU, Archaeological Ceramics I Anne Underhill

Ceramics are a rich source of information about a range of topics including ancient technology, cooking practices, craft specialization, regional trade, and religious beliefs. This course provides a foundation for investigating such topics and gaining practical experience in archaeological analysis of ceramics. Students have opportunities to focus on ceramics of particular interest to them, whether these are low-fired earthen wares, or porcelains. We discuss ancient pottery production and use made in diverse contexts ranging from households in villages to workshops in cities. In addition we refer to the abundant ethnoarchaeological data about traditional pottery production. TH 1:30–3:20

ARCG 787bU/ANTH 787bU/HSAR 804b, East Asian Objects and Museums: Collection, Curation, and Display Anne Underhill, Youn-mi Kim

This course explores the East Asian art and anthropological collections at Yale’s museums and at other major museums in North America and East Asia. Students study collections and their histories; gain experience in museum practices; and learn from specialists through class visits to other relevant museums in the United States and an associated international conference, Material Culture and Everyday Life before the Korean War: Workshop on the Korean Art and Photograph Collections at the Yale Peabody Museum, sponsored by the Council on East Asian Studies. Opportunities for a student-curated exhibition at Yale are being developed. W 9:25–11:15

ARCG 847bU/ANTH 847bU, Hunter-Gatherers Brian Wood

The vast majority of the human experience centered around one way of making a living: hunting and gathering. Yet today, hunter-gatherers make up a small and diminishing proportion of human societies. This class is a broad survey of the ecology, economics, political, and social organization of recent hunter-gatherers and a review of anthropological inquiry into foraging societies. T 1:30–3:20

ARCG 864bU/ANTH 864bU, Human Osteology Eric Sargis

A lecture and laboratory course focusing on the characteristics of the human skeleton and its use in studies of functional morphology, paleodemography, and paleopathology. Laboratories familiarize students with skeletal parts; lectures focus on the nature of bone tissue, its biomechanical modification, sexing, aging, and interpretation of lesions. TTH 2:30–3:45

ARCG 953a or b, Directed Research in Archaeology and Prehistory

By arrangement with faculty.

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Architecture

Rudolph Hall, 203.432.2288

www.architecture.yale.edu/phd

M.Phil., Ph.D.

Dean

Deborah Berke

Director of Doctoral Studies

Alan Plattus (710 Rudolph, 203.432.2290, alan.plattus@yale.edu)

Professors Michelle Addington, Deborah Berke, Peggy Deamer, Keller Easterling, Peter Eisenman, Kurt Forster, Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Alan Plattus, Robert A. M. Stern, Anthony Vidler

Associate Professors Alexander Felson, Mark Foster Gage, Kyoung Sun Moon, Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen, Elihu Rubin

Adjunct Faculty Sunil Bald, Kent Bloomer, Turner Brooks, Alexander Garvin, Steven Harris, John Jacobson, Bimal Mendis, Edward Mitchell, Joel Sanders

Fields of Study

The doctoral program prepares candidates for careers in university teaching, cultural advocacy and administration, museum curatorship, and publishing. It aims chiefly, however, to educate teachers capable of effectively instructing future architects in the history of their own field and its manifold connections with the culture at large. The program forges a unique combination of professional knowledge with a historical and analytical grasp of key phases in the history of architecture, especially those that have a demonstrable share in the field’s current state and the critical issues it faces.

The program secures sound training in historical study and historiography, imparting technical knowledge and awareness of intellectual trends that inform the reception and role of architecture around the world. The history of science and technology (as well as its reception in popular culture and the arts), the history of media, and an understanding of architectural practice are as important as the fine arts and literature.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have appropriate academic credentials (a master’s degree or equivalent in Architecture, Engineering, Environmental Design, or, exceptionally, in a related field) and two years of professional work in an architecture office. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test taken no more than five years prior to application is required. All applicants whose native language is not English are required to take the Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT), a test that includes a section on spoken English. The TOEFL requirement may be waived only for applicants who, prior to matriculation at Yale, will have received a baccalaureate degree or its international equivalent from a college or university where English is the primary language of instruction. Applicants must have studied in residence at the baccalaureate institution for at least three years to receive the waiver. A waiver will not be granted on the basis of an advanced degree (such as M.A., M.S., or Ph.D.) from any institution.

In addition to meeting qualifying criteria, candidates are required as part of the application to submit a portfolio of their own architectural work, a writing sample in the form of a substantial research paper or publication, and an explanation of their motivation for engaging in this course of study. Qualified applicants may be invited to interview with a member of the doctoral faculty.

The portfolio should be a well-edited representation of the applicant’s creative work. Portfolios may not contain videos. Anything submitted that is not entirely the applicant’s own work must be clearly identified as such.

The portfolio is submitted digitally as a single pdf document optimized not to exceed 20mb; it will need to be uploaded to the online application. Pages of the pdf portfolio should be uploaded as spreads. The digital portfolio will be viewed on computer screens, so resolution above 150 dpi is not necessary.

The Ph.D. program is administered by the Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. For questions regarding admissions, please contact graduate.admissions@yale.edu.

School of Architecture Summer Preparation Courses for Incoming Ph.D. Students

In the week before the beginning of the School of Architecture fall term, the School of Architecture offers two preparation courses that are required of incoming Ph.D. students.

  • • Summer Digital Media Orientation Course. This half-day orientation covers accessing the School’s servers, use of the School’s equipment, and the School’s digital media policies and procedures.
  • • Arts Library Research Methodology Course. This course covers research methodologies and tools specific to the Ph.D. curriculum.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Entering students with sound professional preparation engage in a concerted course of study that leads directly to dissertation research and a doctoral degree.

Students are required to be full-time and in residence in the New Haven area during the first two academic years (see the Bulletin of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Programs and Policies). Students take twelve graduate and Ph.D. seminars for credit, including a Ph.D. seminar taught in each of the first four terms by a member of the School of Architecture faculty that introduces the student to various methodologies and areas of study. Some seminars encourage primary research on a narrow topic or focus on producing a collective body of work. Others offer a broader survey of historiographies or focus on the close reading of a body of texts. These four required seminars form the methodological core of the program.

Students are encouraged to take courses related to their specific areas of interest outside the School of Architecture. For example, a student working on Italian modernism would be encouraged to take a course in Italian history or literature. Typically, at least two of the eight elective seminars would be in related fields. Students can also opt to do independent readings with individual faculty members on their specific areas of interest.

Not later than the end of their second year, students are also expected to demonstrate competence in at least one foreign language relevant to their field of study. Language competence is more than a formality and requires some acquaintance with the literature in the chosen language. Competency may be determined by a grade of B or better in a yearlong intermediate-level language course, or through examination.

The student’s field of interest is defined by the end of the second year, at which time the director of doctoral studies assigns the student an adviser, who may or may not be from the School of Architecture. At the end of the second year and after the student has taken the three oral examinations, the director of doctoral studies, in consultation with the student’s adviser, appoints a dissertation committee for the student. The dissertation committee consists of the student’s adviser plus two additional faculty members. One of the dissertation committee members should be from outside the School of Architecture, with selection based on the student’s area of interest. The dissertation committee guides and monitors the student’s progress in writing the dissertation and evaluates the dissertation upon completion.

By the end of their second year, doctoral students normally complete all course and language requirements. Oral examinations are taken on topics relevant to the student’s doctoral research. Examiners question the candidate in the presence of the director of doctoral studies and the thesis adviser.

During the third year, candidates present and defend a preliminary proposal for a dissertation topic, consisting of a topic statement, detailed program of research, and an annotated bibliography. By the end of the third year, students begin dissertation research and writing, submitting drafts of the dissertation chapters as they are completed.

While this is a five-year program, if the dissertation has not been completed by the end of year five and, at that time, the program certifies that the candidate will complete the dissertation by August of the following academic year, the candidate may be eligible in year six for a teaching position and funding for up to an additional nine months.

Graduate Research Assistant and Teaching Fellow Experience

The program in Architecture considers teaching to be an important part of graduate training. Students in the Ph.D. program in Architecture, therefore, are expected to teach for four terms, normally in their third and fourth years. During these four terms, it is anticipated that a Ph.D. student teach in two history and theory survey courses in the student’s area of study at the School of Architecture or elsewhere in the University and teach in two design studios at the School of Architecture. Each teaching assignment shall be under the direct supervision of senior faculty.

Master’s Degree

M.Phil. The Master of Philosophy degree is awarded en route to the Ph.D. The minimum requirements for this degree are that a student has completed all requirements for the Ph.D., except the teaching fellow assignments and the dissertation.

Required Courses

ARCH 551a, Ph.D. Seminar I

1 credit. (Required in, and limited to, Ph.D. first year, fall term.) This seminar centers on a thorough examination of fundamental ideas of historiography, centering on Rome and exploring aspects of geology, culture, mapping, site development, the establishment of institutions, and the construction of buildings across several millennia, as well as a study of literature on the urbs and its worldwide impact.

ARCH 552b, Ph.D. Seminar II

1 credit. (Required in, and limited to, Ph.D. first year, spring term.) This seminar centers on concepts of history and their application to architecture from Jacob Burckhardt to the present and a close reading of historiographic theories, including ethnography, modernity, and the emergence of the profession of architecture in the light of present-day critique.

ARCH 553a, Ph.D. Seminar III

1 credit. (Required in, and limited to, Ph.D. second year, fall term.)

ARCH 554b, Dissertation Preparation

1 credit. (Required in, and limited to, Ph.D. second year, spring term.) Ph.D. tutoring in preparation for oral examinations and formulation of a thesis topic.

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Astronomy

52 Hillhouse Avenue, 203.432.3000

http://astronomy.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Sarbani Basu

Director of Graduate Studies

Jeffrey Kenney (203.432.3013, jeff.kenney@yale.edu)

Professors Charles Bailyn, Charles Baltay (Physics), Sarbani Basu, Paolo Coppi, Pierre Demarque (Emeritus), Debra Fischer, Marla Geha, Jeffrey Kenney, Richard Larson (Emeritus), Priyamvada Natarajan, C. Megan Urry (Physics), William van Altena (Emeritus), Pieter van Dokkum, Robert Zinn

Associate Professors Héctor Arce, Daisuke Nagai (Physics), Nikhil Padmanabhan (Physics), Frank van den Bosch

Fields of Study

Fields include observational and theoretical astronomy, solar and stellar astrophysics, exoplanets, astrometry, galactic astronomy, extragalactic astronomy, radio astronomy, high-energy astrophysics, and cosmology.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants are expected to have a strong undergraduate preparation in physics and mathematics. Although some formal training in astronomy is useful, it is by no means a prerequisite for admission. Applicants are required to take the General GRE as well as the subject test in Physics.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

A typical program of study includes twelve courses taken during the first four terms, and must include the core courses listed below:

The Physics of Astrophysics (ASTR 500), Computational Methods in Astrophysics and Geophysics (ASTR 520), Observational Astronomy (ASTR 555), Interstellar Matter and Star Formation (ASTR 560), either Stellar Populations (ASTR 510) or Stellar Astrophysics (ASTR 550), and either Galaxies (ASTR 530) or The Evolving Universe (ASTR 565). ASTR 620 or PHYS 678 may be substituted for ASTR 520 with the permission of the director of graduate studies (DGS).

Students require the permission of the instructor and the DGS to skip a core class if they think that they have sufficient knowledge of the field. Students will be required to demonstrate their knowledge of the field before they are allowed to skip any core class.

Two of the twelve courses must be research credits, each earned by working in close collaboration with a faculty member. Of the two research credits, one must be earned doing a theoretical project and one doing an experimental research project. The students need to present the results of the project as a written report and will be given an evaluation of their performance.

The choice of the four remaining courses depends on the candidate’s interest and background and must be decided in consultation with the DGS and/or the prospective thesis adviser. Advisers may require students to take particular classes and obtain a specified minimum grade in order for a student to work with them for their thesis. Students must take any additional course that their supervisors require even after their fourth term. In addition, all students, regardless of their term of study, have to attend Professional Seminar (ASTR 710) every term. Students must also take Responsible Conduct in Research for Physical Scientists (PHYS 590), which discusses ethics and responsible conduct in scientific research and fulfills the requirement stipulated by the National Science Foundation for all students and for all postdoctoral researchers funded by the NSF. Note that ASTR 710 and PHYS 590 may not be used to fulfill the twelve-course requirement.

Students are encouraged to take graduate courses in physics or related subjects. On an irregular basis, special topic courses and seminars are offered, which provide the opportunity to study some fields in greater depth than is possible in standard courses. To achieve both breadth and depth in their education, students are encouraged to take a few courses beyond their second year of study.

There is no foreign language requirement. A written comprehensive examination, normally taken at the end of the fourth term of graduate work, tests the student’s familiarity with the entire field of astronomy and related branches of physics and mathematics. Particular attention will be paid to the student’s performance in the field in which the student plans to do research. An oral examination, held a few weeks after the written examination, is based on the student’s chosen field of research. Satisfactory performance in these examinations, an acceptable record in course and research work, and an approved dissertation prospectus are required for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. The dissertation should present the results of an original and thorough investigation, worthy of publication. Most importantly, it should reflect the candidate’s capacity for independent research. An oral dissertation defense is required.

Teaching experience is an integral part of graduate education in astronomy. All students are required to serve as teaching fellows for four terms. Both the level of teaching assignments and the scheduling of teaching are variable and largely determined by the needs of the department. Most students will teach in each of their first three terms and complete their fourth teaching assignment sometime after the qualifying exam.

Honors Requirement

Students must earn a grade of Honors in at least three classes by the end of the fourth term of full-time study and have a grade average of High Pass.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. Upon application, the department will recommend for the award of the M.Phil. degree any student who has completed all the requirements of the Ph.D. degree except the oral qualifying exam and the Ph.D. dissertation. A written master’s thesis containing original astronomical research is also required. Students are not admitted for this degree.

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) Upon application, the department will recommend for the award of the M.S. degree any student who has taken at least ten courses (not including ASTR 710), including at least one research project (ASTR 580). The student should have a grade average of High Pass in the courses and a grade of High Pass or above in the research project.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Astronomy, Yale University, PO Box 208101, New Haven CT 06520-8101.

Courses

ASTR 500a, The Physics of Astrophysics Priyamvada Natarajan

Primarily for incoming students in the Ph.D. program in Astronomy. The basic physics and related mathematics needed to take the advanced graduate courses. Topics in mechanics, thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, fluid mechanics, special relativity, and electrodynamics with applications to astrophysical systems are covered. Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor. MW 9–10:15

[ASTR 510au, Stellar Populations]

[ASTR 518b, Stellar Dynamics]

ASTR 520a/G&G 538a, Computational Methods in Astrophysics and Geophysics  Paolo Coppi

The analytic and numerical/computational tools necessary for effective research in astronomy, geophysics, and related disciplines. Topics include numerical solutions to differential equations, spectral methods, and Monte Carlo simulations. Applications are made to common astrophysical and geophysical problems including fluids and N-body simulations.

[ASTR 525a, Advanced Statistical Methods for Astronomy]

[ASTR 530au, Galaxies]

[ASTR 540bu/G&G 501bU, Radiative Processes in Astrophysics/Stellar Atmospheres]

ASTR 550au, Stellar Astrophysics Sarbani Basu

An introduction to the physics of stellar atmospheres and interiors. The basic equations of stellar structure, nuclear processes, stellar evolution, white dwarfs, and neutron stars.

ASTR 555bu, Observational Astronomy Robert Zinn

The design and use of optical telescopes, cameras, spectrographs, and detectors to make astronomical observations. The reduction and analysis of photometric and spectroscopic observations.

ASTR 560a, Interstellar Matter and Star Formation Héctor Arce

The composition, extent, temperature, and density structure of the interstellar medium (ISM). Excitation and radiative processes; the properties of dust; the cold and hot ISM in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Dynamics and evolution of the ISM, including interactions between stars and interstellar matter. Physics and chemistry of molecular clouds and the process of star formation.

[ASTR 565bU, The Evolving Universe]

[ASTR 570a/PHYS 570a, High-Energy Astrophysics]

[ASTR 575b, Exoplanets]

ASTR 580a or b, Research

By arrangement with faculty.

[ASTR 585b, Radio Astronomy]

[ASTR 590bu, Solar Physics]

ASTR 600bu/PHYS 600b, Cosmology Priyamvada Natarajan

A comprehensive introduction to cosmology at the graduate level. The standard paradigm for the formation, growth, and evolution of structure in the universe is covered in detail. Topics include the inflationary origin of density fluctuations; the thermodynamics of the early universe; assembly of structure at late times and current status of observations. The basics of general relativity required to understand essential topics in cosmology are covered. Advanced undergraduates may register for the course with permission of the instructor.

ASTR 610b, The Theory of Galaxy Formation Frank van den Bosch

The physical processes of galaxy formation and evolution. Topics include Newtonian perturbation theory, the spherical collapse model, formation and structure of dark matter haloes, cooling and feedback processes, star formation, stellar population synthesis, chemical enrichment, and the statistical treatment of the large-scale distribution of galaxies.

ASTR 620b, Advanced Programming Tutorial for Astronomy Paolo Coppi

Students meet individually with the instructor to ensure they have the computational skills necessary to carry out their research projects. The first part of the course is based on weekly programming and reading assignments, tailored to the level of each student. The second part of the course focuses on putting together a substantial programming project that is directly related to the student’s research interests, ideally in consultation with the student’s likely research supervisor. 3 HTBA

ASTR 666a/AMTH 666a/G&G 666a, Classical Statistical Thermodynamics  John Wettlaufer

Classical thermodynamics is derived from statistical thermodynamics. Using the multi­particle nature of physical systems, we derive ergodicity, the central limit theorem, and the elemental description of the second law of thermodynamics. We then develop kinetics, transport theory, and reciprocity from the linear thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Topics of focus include Onsager reciprocal relations, the Fokker-Planck equation, stability in the sense of Lyapunov, and time invariance symmetry. We explore phenomena that are of direct relevance to astrophysical and geophysical settings. No quantum mechanics is necessary as a prerequisite.

ASTR 710a and b, Professional Seminar

A weekly seminar covering science and professional issues in astronomy.

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Biomedical Engineering

Dunham Laboratory, 203.432.4252

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Jay Humphrey

Director of Graduate Studies

Richard Carson (richard.carson@yale.edu)

Professors Richard Carson, Nicholas Christakis, James Duncan, Karen Hirschi, Jay Humphrey, Fahmeed Hyder, Themis Kyriakides (Pathology), Andre Levchenko, Laura Niklason, Douglas Rothman, W. Mark Saltzman, Martin Schwartz, Fred Sigworth, Brian Smith, Lawrence Staib, Hemant Tagare, Paul Van Tassel, Steven Zucker (Computer Science)

Associate Professors Joerg Bewersdorf (Cell Biology), Robin de Graaf, Tarek Fahmy, Rong Fan, Anjelica Gonzalez, Evan Morris, Xenophon Papademetris, Corey Wilson

Assistant Professors Stuart Campbell, Michael Choma, Chi Liu, Kathryn Miller-Jensen, Michael Murrell, Steven Tommasini, Jiangbing Zhou

Fields of Study

Fields include biological devices, biological signals and sensors, biomaterials, biomechanics, biophotonics, computer vision, digital image analysis and processing, drug delivery, modeling in mechanobiology, MRI, MRS, PET and modeling, the physics of image formation (MRI, optics, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, and X-ray), physiology and human factors engineering, systems biology, systems medicine, and tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

For admissions and degree requirements, and for course listings, see Engineering & Applied Science.

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Cell Biology

Sterling Hall of Medicine C207, 203.737.5603

www.cellbiology.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

James Rothman

Director of Graduate Studies

Karin Reinisch (SHM C214a, 203.785.6469, karin.reinisch@yale.edu)

Professors Christopher Burd, Michael Caplan (Cellular & Molecular Physiology), Lynn Cooley (Genetics), Peter Cresswell (Immunobiology), Pietro De Camilli, Jorge Galán (Microbial Pathogenesis), Fred Gorelick, Carl Hashimoto, James Jamieson, Diane Krause (Laboratory Medicine), Thomas Lentz (Emeritus), Haifan Lin, Vincent Marchesi (Pathology), Mark Mooseker (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Michael Nathanson (Internal Medicine/Digestive Diseases), Karla Neugebauer (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Thomas Pollard (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology; on leave [F]), Karin Reinisch, James Rothman, Martin Schwartz (Internal Medicine/Cardiology), Michael Simons (Internal Medicine/Cardiology), Sandra Wolin

Associate Professors Joerg Bewersdorf, Jonathan Bogan (Internal Medicine/Endocrinology), David Calderwood (Pharmacology), Daniel Colón-Ramos, Valentina Greco (Genetics), Megan King, Thomas Melia, Christian Schlieker (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Derek Toomre, Yongli Zhang

Assistant Professors David Baddeley, Topher Carroll, Shawn Ferguson, Shangqin Guo, Chenxiang Lin, Patrick Lusk, Malaiyalam Mariappan, Peter Takizawa, Jie Yao

Fields of Study

Fields include membrane traffic and protein sorting, organelle biogenesis, epithelial cell polarity, membrane function in the nervous system (synapse formation and function), neural circuit development, cell biology of protozoan parasites and of pathogen/host interactions, cell biology of the immune response, mRNA biogenesis and localization, RNA folding, non-coding RNAs, stem cells, the cytoskeleton, nuclear structure and dynamics, DNA nanostructures, cellular signaling and motility, cytokinesis. Approaches to these topics include biochemistry, biophysics, molecular biology, and crystallography; bacterial, yeast, Drosophila, C. elegans, and mouse genetics; immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy; live cell and super-resolution imaging.

Special Admissions Requirements

An undergraduate major in the biological sciences is recommended. GRE General Test is required; GRE Subject Test is recommended (in Biology or in Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology).

To enter the Ph.D. program, students apply to an interest-based track, usually the Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development (MCGD) track or the Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology (BBSB) track, within the interdepartmental graduate program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS), http://bbs.yale.edu.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students are required to take at least five graduate-level courses. No specific curriculum of courses is required, but CBIO 602a (Molecular Cell Biology) is recommended for all students to attain a solid foundation in molecular cell biology. Also recommended is a seminar course, such as CBIO 603a (Seminar in Molecular Cell Biology), in which students can develop the skill for critical analysis of research papers. Students design their own curriculum of courses to meet individual interests and needs, in consultation with the director of graduate studies. During the first year, students participate in three laboratory rotations. In the second year, a committee of faculty members determines whether each student is qualified to continue in the Ph.D. program. There is an oral qualifying examination by the end of the third term. In order to be admitted to candidacy, students must have met the Graduate School Honors requirement, maintained a High Pass average in course work, passed the qualifying examination, submitted an approved prospectus, and received a positive evaluation of their laboratory work from the thesis committee. All students are required to present a talk at the departmental progress report series each year after passing the qualifying exam. The remaining degree requirements include completion of the dissertation project and the writing of the dissertation and its oral defense, the formal submission of copies of the written dissertation to the Graduate School, and the deposit of an additional copy with the department. Laboratory rotations and thesis research may be conducted outside of the department.

An important aspect of graduate training in cell biology is the acquisition of teaching skills through participation in courses appropriate for the student’s scientific interests. These opportunities can be drawn from a diverse menu of lecture, laboratory, and seminar courses given at the undergraduate, graduate, and medical school levels. Ph.D. students are required to participate in two terms (or the equivalent) of teaching. Students are not expected to teach during their first year.

In addition to all other requirements, students must successfully complete CBIO 901b, First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research, prior to the end of their first year of study. In their fourth year of study, all students must successfully complete B&BS 503b, RCR Refresher for Senior BBS Students.

M.D./Ph.D. Students

M.D./Ph.D. students are required to take a total of five graduate-level courses for a grade, including Molecules to Systems (CBIO 502), Molecular Cell Biology (CBIO 602a), and a seminar course that involves the reading and class discussion of research papers. The remaining courses can be in areas such as Genetics, Neuroscience, Immunology, Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Physiology. Students must meet the Graduate School requirement of a grade of Honors in two courses, if necessary taking additional courses beyond the five required in the department to fulfill this requirement. Students must also maintain an average grade of High Pass in all courses. One term of teaching is required.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. Requirements for the M.Phil. degree are the same as for admission to candidacy (see above).

M.S. This degree is normally granted only to students who are withdrawing from the Ph.D. program. To be eligible for the degree, a student must have completed at least five graduate-level term courses at Yale, including CBIO 602a (Molecular Cell Biology) and a seminar course, with a grade of Pass and at least one grade of Honors or three of High Pass. In addition to these five courses, the student must have received a Satisfactory grade in the following five courses: CBIO 900a (First-Year Introduction to Research—Grant Writing and Scientific Communication), CBIO 901b (First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research), CBIO 911a (First Laboratory Rotation), CBIO 912b (Second Laboratory Rotation), and CBIO 913b (Third Laboratory Rotation). Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.S.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit the BBS Web site (http://bbs.yale.edu), MCGD and BBSB tracks. Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Cell Biology, Yale University, PO Box 208002, New Haven CT 06520-8002.

Courses

CBIO 502, Molecules to Systems Peter Takizawa, Fred Gorelick, James Jamieson, Thomas Lentz, and faculty

This course is designed to provide medical students with a current and comprehensive review of biologic structure and function at the cellular, tissue, and organ system levels. Areas covered include structure and organization of cells; regulation of the cell cycle and mitosis; protein biosynthesis and membrane targeting; cell motility and the cytoskeleton; signal transduction; cell adhesion; cell and tissue organization of organ systems. Clinical correlation sessions, which illustrate the contributions of cell biology to specific medical problems, are interspersed in the lecture schedule. Histophysiology laboratories provide practical experience with an understanding of exploring cell and tissue structure. The course is offered only to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students. It runs for three terms from September to December of the next academic year to coincide with the School of Medicine curriculum. Registration and the release of grades takes place in the third term. The course is equivalent to two graduate credits.

CBIO 601a/b, Molecular and Cellular Basis of Human Disease Fred Gorelick, James Jamieson, and faculty

The course emphasizes the connections between diseases and basic science using a lecture and seminar format. It is designed for students who are committed to a career in medical research, those who are considering such a career, or students who wish to explore scientific topics in depth. The first half of the course is organized in four- to five-week blocks that topically parallel CBIO 502a/b. Examples of blocks from past years include “Diseases of protein folding” and “Diseases of ion channels.” Each topic is introduced with a lecture given by the faculty. The lecture is followed by sessions in which students review relevant manuscripts under the supervision of a faculty mentor. The second half of the course focuses on the relationship of basic science to disease processes while emphasizing translational and clinical research. In addition, sessions are devoted to academic careers and cover subjects such as obtaining an academic position, promotions, and grant writing. The course is open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students who are taking or have taken CBIO 502a/b. Student evaluations are based on attendance, participation in group discussions, formal presentations, and a written review of an NIH proposal. The course runs from September to mid-May and is equivalent to two graduate credits. M 4–5:30

CBIO 602a/MB&B 602a/MCDB 602a, Molecular Cell Biology Sandra Wolin, Michael Caplan, Topher Carroll, Craig Crews, Pietro De Camilli, Megan King, Thomas Melia, In-Hyun Park, James Rothman, Martin Schwartz

A comprehensive introduction to the molecular and mechanistic aspects of cell biology for graduate students in all programs. Emphasizes fundamental issues of cellular organization, regulation, biogenesis, and function at the molecular level. MW 1:45–3

CBIO 603a/MCDB 603a, Seminar in Molecular Cell Biology Megan King, Michael Caplan, Topher Carroll, Craig Crews, Pietro De Camilli, Thomas Melia, James Rothman, Martin Schwartz, Sandra Wolin

A graduate-level seminar course in modern cell biology. The class is devoted to the reading and critical evaluation of classical and current papers. The topics are coordinated with the CBIO 602a lecture schedule. Thus, concurrent enrollment in CBIO 602a is required. Th 9–11

CBIO 604b, Systems Cell Biology Carl Hashimoto, Daniel Colón-Ramos, and faculty

Introduction to the organization and function of cells within complex multicellular systems as encountered in the human body. Covers major tissues and organs as well as the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems, with special emphasis on the molecular and cellular bases of developmental processes and human diseases. Lectures supplemented by electronic-based tutorials on the histology of tissues and organs. T 9:30–10:30, Th 9:30–11

CBIO 606b, Advanced Topics in Cell Biology Patrick Lusk, Christopher Burd, Shawn Ferguson

This seminar course, which meets once weekly, covers advanced topics in cell biology. Each topic is spread over two or three sessions, which start with an introductory overview and are followed by a discussion of key papers led by an expert in the field. T 4:15–6

CBIO 611b, Vascular Cell Biology Martin Schwartz and faculty

This course introduces the structure and organ-level physiology of the vascular system, then covers in greater depth the development, regulation, mechanics, and pathology of blood vessels. The major focus is on cellular and molecular mechanisms. The course includes both lectures and reading and discussion of recent literature. WF 1:30–2:30

CBIO 655a/GENE 655a, Stem Cells: Biology and Application In-Hyun Park, Haifan Lin, and faculty

This course is designed for first-year or second-year students to learn the fundamentals of stem cell biology and to gain familiarity with current research in the field. The course is presented in a lecture and discussion format based on primary literature. Topics include stem cell concepts, methodologies for stem cell research, embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, cloning and stem cell reprogramming, and clinical applications of stem cell research. Prerequisites: undergraduate-level cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics. TH 1:30–3

CBIO 701b, Illuminating Cellular Function Derek Toomre, Joerg Bewersdorf, and faculty

Introduction to the principles and practical methods of live cell imaging. Covers principles of fluorescent microscopy (including genetically encoded probes and physiological indicators), image formation, image detection, and image analysis. Includes hands-on demonstrations of state-of-the-art instrumentation, such as video-rate confocal and super-resolution “nanoscopes.” TTH 11–12:30

CBIO 900a/GENE 900a/MCDB 900a, First-Year Introduction to Research—Grant Writing and Scientific Communication Scott Holley and faculty

Grant writing, scientific communication, and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. M 4–5:30

CBIO 901b/GENE 901b/MCDB 901b, First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research Joerg Bewersdorf

Ethics and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. TH 4:15–5:45

CBIO 903a or b, Reading Course in Cell Biology Karin Reinisch

Independent study of specific topics in cell biology through directed reading of the literature under faculty supervision. Student may choose any topic and any Yale faculty subject to approval by the Cell Biology DGS. Open to Cell Biology students, and to students in other departments with approval from their respective DGS. Term paper required.

CBIO 911a/GENE 911a/MCDB 911a, First Laboratory Rotation

First laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

CBIO 912b/GENE 912b/MCDB 912b, Second Laboratory Rotation Craig Crews

Second laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

CBIO 913b/GENE 913b/MCDB 913b, Third Laboratory Rotation Craig Crews

Third laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

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Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Sterling Hall of Medicine B147, 203.785.4041

http://physiology.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Michael Caplan

Director of Graduate Studies
  • David Zenisek (SHM B114, 203.785.6474, david.zenisek@yale.edu)

Professors Peter Aronson (Internal Medicine/Nephrology), Angelique Bordey (Neurosurgery), Emile Boulpaep, Thomas Brown (Psychology), Cecilia Canessa, Lloyd Cantley (Internal Medicine/Nephrology), Michael Caplan, Nancy Carrasco, Lawrence Cohen, Marie Egan (Pediatrics), Barbara Ehrlich (Pharmacology), Anne Eichmann (Internal Medicine/Cardiology), Biff Forbush III, John Geibel (Surgery), Leonard Kaczmarek (Pharmacology), George Lister (Pediatrics), Pramod Mistry (Pediatrics), Michael Nitabach, Vincent Pieribone, Patricia Preisig (Internal Medicine/Nephrology), W. Mark Saltzman (Biomedical Engineering), Joseph Santos-Sacchi (Surgery/Otolaryngology), Gerald Shulman (Internal Medicine/Endocrinology), Fred Sigworth, Carolyn Slayman (Genetics), Clifford Slayman, Susumu Tomita, Fred Wright (Internal Medicine/Nephrology), Lawrence Young (Internal Medicine/Cardiology), David Zenisek, Z. Jimmy Zhou (Ophthalmology & Visual Science)

Associate Professors Nadia Ameen (Pediatrics), Ivan de Arajuo (Psychiatry), Jonathan Demb (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), Richard Kibbey (Internal Medicine/Endocrinology), Alda Tufro (Pediatrics), Xiaoyong Yang (Comparative Medicine)

Assistant Professors Nii Addy (Psychiatry), Sviatoslav Bagriantsev, Stuart Campbell (Biomedical Engineering), Jean-Ju Chung, Guillaume de Lartigue, Tore Eid (Laboratory Medicine), Elena Gracheva, Shuta Ishibe (Internal Medicine/Nephrology), Kristopher Kahle (Neurosurgery), Erdem Karatekin, Jesse Rinehart, Satinder Singh, Carson Thoreen

Fields of Study

Fields of study range from cellular and molecular physiology to integrative medical biology. Areas of current interest include: ion channels, transporters and pumps, membrane biophysics, cellular and systems neurobiology, protein trafficking, epithelial transport, signal transduction pathways, cardiovascular biology, sensory physiology, metabolism, organ physiology, genetic models of human disease, pathophysiology, structural biology of membrane proteins, and physiological genomics.

Special Admissions Requirements

We welcome applications from students with backgrounds in the biological, chemical, and/or physical sciences. These include majors in biology, biochemistry, physiology, genetics, chemistry, physics, mathematics, engineering, computer science, and psychology. Courses in biology, biochemistry, organic and physical chemistry, and mathematics through calculus are recommended. The GRE General Test is required. To enter the Ph.D. program, students will apply to the Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology track within the interdepartmental graduate program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS), http://bbs.yale.edu.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Formal requirements for the Ph.D. degree include two or three terms of course work, a qualifying examination taken by the end of the second year, submission of a thesis prospectus, two terms of teaching, and completion and satisfactory defense of the thesis.

Students are expected to design a suitable program of courses in consultation with a faculty adviser. The director of graduate studies (DGS) will provide general oversight of the course selections. These courses will provide a coherent background for the expected area of thesis research and also satisfy the department’s subject and proficiency requirements. Students must satisfactorily pass at least six graduate-level courses, including C&MP 550a, 560b, and 630a. Also during the first two terms, each student should explore research projects by performing rotations in at least three laboratories to create an informed basis upon which to select a thesis project by the end of the first year. There is no foreign language requirement. The qualifying examination, which must be passed by the end of the student’s fourth term, will cover areas of physiology that complement the student’s major research interest.

An important dimension of graduate training in Cellular and Molecular Physiology is the acquisition of teaching skills through participation in courses appropriate for the student’s academic interests. Ph.D. students are expected to participate in two terms (or the equivalent) of teaching, at a TF level 20. Students are not expected to teach before passing the qualifying examination.

In addition to all other requirements, students must successfully complete C&MP 650, The Responsible Conduct of Research, prior to the end of their first year of study; and, in their fourth year of study, all students must successfully complete B&BS 503b, RCR Refresher for Senior BBS Students.

After satisfying the departmental predissertation requirements, passing the qualifying examination, submitting a satisfactory thesis prospectus, and presenting a satisfactory report to the appropriate thesis advisory committee, students are admitted to candidacy. The completed dissertation must describe original research making a significant contribution to knowledge.

Honors Requirement

Students must meet the Graduate School’s Honors requirement by the end of the fourth term of full-time study. Students must also maintain an overall High Pass average. Student progress toward these goals is reviewed at the end of the second term.

Special Requirements for M.D./Ph.D. Students

M.D./Ph.D. students must pass at least three graduate-level courses that are not part of the Yale School of Medicine’s regular M.D. program, including at least one C&MP course, preferably C&MP 560b.

Courses taken toward the M.D. degree can be counted toward the Graduate School’s Honors requirement provided that the course carries a graduate course number and the student has registered for it as a graduate course.

Two laboratory rotations, each lasting five weeks, are required. One term of teaching is required.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations. Awarded to students who have fulfilled all the requirements for the Ph.D. except the prospectus, teaching requirement, and dissertation, normally at the end of the second year. Students are not admitted for this degree.

M.S. Awarded only to students who are not continuing for the Ph.D. degree but who have successfully completed one year of the doctoral program (i.e., passing of at least four graduate-level courses, including two Honors grades, and three successful laboratory rotations). Students are not admitted for this degree. Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.S.

Program materials are available upon request to the Department Registrar, Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale School of Medicine, PO Box 208026, New Haven CT 06520-8026.

Courses

C&MP 550au/ENAS 550au/MCDB 550au/PHAR 550a, Physiological Systems  Emile Boulpaep, Stuart Campbell

The course develops a foundation in human physiology by examining the homeostasis of vital parameters within the body, and the biophysical properties of cells, tissues, and organs. Basic concepts in cell and membrane physiology are synthesized through exploring the function of skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscle. The physical basis of blood flow, mechanisms of vascular exchange, cardiac performance, and regulation of overall circulatory function are discussed. Respiratory physiology explores the mechanics of ventilation, gas diffusion, and acid-base balance. Renal physiology examines the formation and composition of urine and the regulation of electrolyte, fluid, and acid-base balance. Organs of the digestive system are discussed from the perspective of substrate metabolism and energy balance. Hormonal regulation is applied to metabolic control and to calcium, water, and electrolyte balance. The biology of nerve cells is addressed with emphasis on synaptic transmission and simple neuronal circuits within the central nervous system. The special senses are considered in the framework of sensory transduction. Weekly discussion sections provide a forum for in-depth exploration of topics. Graduate students evaluate research findings through literature review and weekly meetings with the instructor. MWF 9:25–10:15

C&MP 560bu/ENAS 570bu/MCDB 560bu/PHAR 560b, Cellular and Molecular Physiology: Molecular Machines in Human Disease Emile Boulpaep, Fred Sigworth

The course focuses on understanding the processes that transfer molecules across membranes at the cellular, molecular, biophysical, and physiological levels. Students learn about the different classes of molecular machines that mediate membrane transport, generate electrical currents, or perform mechanical displacement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the molecular structures of membrane proteins and their individual functions. The interactions among transport proteins in determining the physiological behaviors of cells and tissues are also stressed. Molecular motors are introduced and their mechanical relationship to cell function is explored. Students read papers from the scientific literature that establish the connections between mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins and a wide variety of human genetic diseases. MWF 9:25–10:15

C&MP 570b/NBIO 570b, Sensory Physiology David Zenisek, Joseph Santos-Sacchi, Z. Jimmy Zhou

The course provides an overview of the mammalian special sensory systems, including molecular and cellular bases of vision, audition, taste, olfaction, and somatosensation. Faculty with focus in those areas lead presentations and discussions on peripheral and central mechanisms. Psychophysical aspects of sensation are introduced. TTH 2:30–3:45

C&MP 600, Medical Physiology Case Conferences Nancy Carrasco and staff

Two-term course taught in groups of ten to twelve students by the same group leader(s) throughout the year. Workshop format permits students to apply basic concepts of physiology to clinical syndromes and disease processes. Students are expected to participate actively in a weekly discussion of a clinical case that illustrates principles of human physiology and pathophysiology at the whole-body, system, organ, cellular, or molecular level. Prerequisites: C&MP 550a and permission of the instructor. Credit for full year only.

C&MP 610, Medical Research Scholars Program: Mentored Clinical Experience  Erica Herzog, Michael Caplan

The goals of the course are to introduce MRSP students to aspects of clinically important human diseases. Students explore each disease over three one-and-one-half-hour sessions led by a clinician-scientist who is an expert in the relevant organ system. Students explore two disease processes per term. The first of the three sessions is devoted to a discussion of the clinical presentation, natural history, pathology, epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of the disease process. During this session students have the opportunity to view gross or microscopic specimens of diseased tissue in association with members of the Pathology faculty. Students are assigned readings in pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical texts to prepare for the first class session. The second session focuses on translational aspects of the disease process. Students read and present papers relevant to the molecular basis of the disease and cutting-edge approaches to its therapy. In the third session students meet with patients who have experienced the disease and/or visit and explore facilities associated with diagnosis and treatment of the disease process. Prior to the third session students receive guidance as to what they will observe and how to approach the experience; and at the end of the session, the group discusses its thoughts and impressions. Students are expected to prepare for sessions, to participate actively, and to be scrupulously respectful of patients and patient facilities.

C&MP 620b/NBIO 610b, Fundamentals in Neurophysiology Vincent Pieribone, Fred Sigworth

The course is designed for students who wish to gain a theoretical and practical knowledge of modern neurophysiology. Graduate students specializing in neurophysiology and non-neurophysiology are encouraged to attend, as the course begins at a very basic level and progresses to more complicated topics. Topics include properties of ion channels, firing properties of neurons, synaptic transmission, and neurophysiology methodology.

C&MP 630a/PATH 680a/PHAR 502a, Seminar in Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology Don Nguyen, Titus Boggon, Susumu Tomita

Readings and discussion on a diverse range of current topics in molecular medicine, pharmacology, and physiology. The class emphasizes analysis of primary research literature and development of presentation and writing skills. Contemporary articles are assigned on a related topic every week, and a student leads discussions with input from faculty who are experts in the topic area. The overall goal is to cover a specific topic of medical relevance (e.g., cancer, neurodegeneration) from the perspective of three primary disciplines (i.e., physiology: normal function; pathology: abnormal function; and pharmacology: intervention).

C&MP 650/PATH 660/PHAR 580, The Responsible Conduct of Research  Barbara Ehrlich, Demetrios Braddock

Organized to foster discussion, the course is taught by faculty in the Pharmacology, Pathology, and Physiology departments and two or three senior graduate students. Each session is based on case studies from primary literature, reviews, and two texts: Francis Macrina’s Scientific Integrity and Kathy Barker’s At the Bench. Each week, students are required to submit a reaction paper discussing the reading assignment. Students take turns leading the class discussion; a final short paper on a hot topic in bioethics is required. TH 11–12:15

C&MP 710b/MB&B 710b4, Electron Cryo-Microscopy for Protein Structure Determination Fred Sigworth, Charles Sindelar

Understanding cellular function requires structural and biochemical studies at an ever-increasing level of complexity. The course is an introduction to the concepts and applications of high-resolution electron cryo-microscopy. This rapidly emerging new technique is the only method that allows biological macromolecules to be studied at all levels of resolution from cellular organization to near atomic detail. Counts as 0.5 credit. TTH 9–10:15

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Chemical & Environmental Engineering

Dunham Laboratory, 203.432.4252

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Jaehong Kim

Director of Graduate Studies

Eric Altman

Professors Eric Altman, Michelle Bell, Gaboury Benoit, Ruth Blake, Menachem Elimelech, Thomas Graedel, Gary Haller (Emeritus), Edward Kaplan, Michael Loewenberg, Robert McGraw (Adjunct), Andrew Miranker, Lisa Pfefferle, Joseph Pignatello (Adjunct), Daniel Rosner (Emeritus), James Saiers, W. Mark Saltzman, Udo Schwarz, T. Kyle Vanderlick, Paul Van Tassel, Kurt Zilm

Associate Professors Tarek Fahmy, Jaehong Kim, Chinedum Osuji, Jordan Peccia, André Taylor, Corey Wilson, Julie Zimmerman

Assistant Professors Drew Gentner, Shu Hu, Desirée Plata, Mingjiang Zhong

Fields of Study

Fields include nanomaterials, soft matter, interfacial phenomena, biomolecular engineering, energy, water, and sustainability.

For admissions and degree requirements, and for course listings, see Engineering & Applied Science.

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Chemistry

Sterling Chemistry Laboratory, 203.432.3913

www.chem.yale.edu

M.S., Ph.D.

Chair

Gary Brudvig (1 SCL, 203.432.3912, chemistry.chair@yale.edu)

Director of Graduate Studies

Elsa Yan (elsa.yan@yale.edu)

Professors Victor Batista, Jerome Berson (Emeritus), Gary Brudvig, Robert Crabtree, Craig Crews (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology; on leave [F]), R. James Cross, Jr. (Emeritus), Jonathan Ellman, John Faller (Emeritus), Gary Haller (Emeritus), Seth Herzon, Patrick Holland, Francesco Iachello (Physics), Mark Johnson, William Jorgensen, J. Patrick Loria, James Mayer, J. Michael McBride, Scott Miller, Peter Moore (Emeritus), Anna Pyle (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Lynne Regan (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), James Rothman (Cell Biology), Martin Saunders, Alanna Schepartz, Charles Schmuttenmaer, Dieter Söll (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), David Spiegel, Thomas Steitz (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Scott Strobel (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), John Tully (Emeritus), Patrick Vaccaro, Kenneth Wiberg (Emeritus), Elsa Yan, Frederick Ziegler (Emeritus), Kurt Zilm

Associate Professor Nilay Hazari

Assistant Professors Richard Baxter, Jason Crawford, Ziad Ganim, Sarah Slavoff, Timothy Newhouse, Hailiang Wang

Fields of Study

Fields include bio-inorganic chemistry, bio-organic chemistry, biophysical chemistry, chemical biology, chemical physics, inorganic chemistry, materials chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, physical-inorganic chemistry, physical-organic chemistry, synthetic-organic chemistry, and theoretical chemistry.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants are expected to have completed or be completing a standard undergraduate chemistry major including a year of elementary organic chemistry with laboratory, and a year of elementary physical chemistry. Other majors are acceptable if the above requirements are met. The GRE General Test is required. The GRE Subject Test is strongly recommended though not required. Students whose native language is not English are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

A foreign language is not required. Three term courses are required in each of the first two terms of residence. Courses are chosen according to the student’s background and research area. To be admitted to candidacy a student must (1) receive at least two term grades of Honors, exclusive of those for research; (2) pass one oral examination (preparative chemistry students) or two oral examinations (physical chemistry students) by the end of the second year of study; and (3) submit a thesis prospectus no later than the end of the third year of study. Remaining degree requirements include completing a formal proposal (inorganic, organic, and chemical biology students), a written thesis describing the research, and an oral defense of the thesis. The ability to communicate scientific knowledge to others outside the specialized area is crucial to any career in chemistry. Therefore, all students are required to teach a minimum of two terms at a TF level 20. Students may be required by their advisers to teach in additional terms, but would not be required to teach more than five terms over their first five years. All students are required to take CHEM 590a, Ethical Conduct and Scientific Research, in the fall term of their first year of study.

Master’s Degree

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) A student must pass at least five graduate-level term courses in the Chemistry department exclusive of seminars and research. In addition, an overall average (exclusive of seminars and research) of High Pass must be maintained in all courses. One full year of residence is required.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry, Yale University, PO Box 208107, New Haven CT 06520-8107.

Courses

CHEM 505a, Alternative Energy Robert Crabtree

Design principles for molecular components of alternative energy devices. Climate change and our alternative energy future. Light energy conversion, energy transfer, and charge separation in photosynthesis. Dioxygen evolution in photosystem II. Biofuels: bioethanol, biodiesel, hydrogenase. Interaction of light with semiconductors. Fast spectroscopy to probe interfacial electron transfer. Computational design and characterization. Solar cells for electricity, photo-catalysis, biomimetic water oxidation. Hydrogen economy. Team-taught.

CHEM 518au, Advanced Organic Chemistry William Jorgensen

Concise overview of structure, properties, thermodynamics, kinetics, reactions, and intermolecular interactions for organic molecular systems. TTH 11:35–12:50

CHEM 521au, Chemical Biology Jason Crawford, Sarah Slavoff

A one-term introduction to the origins and emerging frontiers of chemical biology. Discussion of the key molecular building blocks of biological systems and the history of macromolecular research in chemistry. MW 9–10:15

[CHEM 522b, Chemical Biology II]

CHEM 523au, Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry Seth Herzon

This course surveys practical methods in synthetic organic chemistry with an emphasis on learning how to acquire new information and understand chemical reactivity from a fundamental and mechanistic perspective. Memorization is deemphasized. Undergraduates are encouraged to enroll. MW 11:35–12:50

[CHEM 524b, Advanced Synthetic Methods in Chemistry]

[CHEM 525bu, Spectroscopic Methods of Structure Determination]

[CHEM 526b, Computational Chemistry and Biochemistry]

[CHEM 528a, Natural Products Synthesis]

CHEM 529b, Special Topics in Chemical Biology Alanna Schepartz

Current topics at the interface of chemistry, biology, and medicine with an emphasis on synthetic biology approaches. TTH 11:35–12:50

CHEM 530au, Statistical Methods and Thermodynamics Victor Batista

The fundamentals of statistical mechanics developed and used to elucidate gas phase and condensed phase behavior, as well as to establish a microscopic derivation of the postulates of thermodynamics. Topics include ensembles; Fermi, Bose, and Boltzmann statistics; density matrices; mean field theories; phase transitions; chemical reaction dynamics; time-correlation functions; Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. MWF 9:25–10:15

CHEM 531b, Special Topics in Organic Chemistry Seth Herzon, William Jorgensen

Current topics in organic chemistry. MW 11:35–12:50

CHEM 537a, Chemistry of Isotopes Martin Saunders

Advanced applications of isotopes to chemical problems and the theory associated with them, including kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects, tracer applications, and dating. MWF 9:25–11:15

CHEM 540au, Molecules and Radiation I Kurt Zilm

An integrated treatment of quantum mechanics and modern spectroscopy. Basic wave and matrix mechanics, perturbation theory, angular momentum, group theory, time-dependent quantum mechanics, selection rules, coherent evolution in two-level systems, line shapes, and NMR spectroscopy. MWF 8:20–9:10

CHEM 542bu, Molecules and Radiation II Charles Schmuttenmaer

An extension of the material covered in CHEM 540a to atomic and molecular spectroscopy, including rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectroscopy, as well as an introduction to laser spectroscopy. MW 11:35–12:50

[CHEM 547b, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance]

[CHEM 548b, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Liquids]

CHEM 549a, Materials Chemistry Hailiang Wang

This course covers fundamental principles in materials chemistry including basic solid-state chemistry; structures, properties, and applications of metals, semiconductors, polymers, and nanomaterials; and material characterization techniques. Special topics at research frontiers of materials chemistry are also covered, including graphene and carbon nanotubes, nanomaterials for batteries, nanomaterials for catalysis, etc. This course aims to serve graduate and senior undergraduate students from various academic departments who are interested in advanced chemistry and nanoscience for materials research. TTH 9–10:15

[CHEM 550bu, Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry]

[CHEM 551b, Biophysics I]

CHEM 552au, Organometallic Chemistry Nilay Hazari

A survey of the organometallic chemistry of the transition elements and of homogeneous catalysis. TTh 9–10:15

CHEM 553b, Small Molecule X-ray Crystallography Brandon Mercado, Nilay Hazari

This course provides an introduction to small molecule crystallography. It covers both theoretical and applied concepts and includes hands-on experience on how to solve and refine the structure of small molecules. MW 11:35–12:50

[CHEM 554b, Bio-Inorganic Chemistry]

[CHEM 555b, Inorganic Mechanisms]

CHEM 556b, Biochemical Rates and Mechanisms J. Patrick Loria

An advanced treatment of enzymology. Topics include transition state theory and derivation of steady-state and pre-steady-state rate equations. The role of entropy and enthalpy in accelerating chemical reactions is considered, along with modern methods for the study of enzyme chemistry. These topics are supplemented with in-depth analysis of the primary literature. TTH 9–10:15

CHEM 557au, Modern Coordination Chemistry Nilay Hazari

The principles of modern inorganic chemistry. Main group and transition element chemistry: reactions, bonding, structure, and spectra. MWF 8:20–9:15

[CHEM 558a, Biophysics II: Biophysical Spectroscopy]

CHEM 559b, Biophysics Richard Baxter, Elsa Yan

A two-part discussion of structural and spectroscopic techniques used to study the properties of biological macromolecules. Part I covers structural methods including light scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation, X-ray crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy. Part II covers optical spectroscopy, such as Raman, infrared, single-molecule, fluorescence, and ultrafast spectroscopy. Emphasis is placed on the physical chemistry that underlies both the execution of such experiments and the interpretation of the resulting data.

CHEM 560La, Advanced Instrumentation Laboratory I Mark Johnson

A laboratory course introducing physical chemistry tools used in the experimental and theoretical investigation of large and small molecules. Modules include electronics, vacuum technology, optical spectroscopy and lasers, and computer programming.

[CHEM 561Lb, Advanced Instrumentation Laboratory II]

CHEM 562L, Laboratory in Instrument Design and the Mechanical Arts Kurt Zilm, David Johnson

Familiarization with modern machine shop practices and techniques. Use of basic metalworking machinery and instruction in techniques of precision measurement and properties of commonly used metals, alloys, and plastics.

CHEM 564L, Advanced Mechanical Instrumentation Kurt Zilm, David Johnson

A course geared for both the arts and sciences that goes beyond the basic introductory shop courses, offering an in-depth foundation study utilizing hands-on instructional techniques that must be learned from experience. Prerequisite: CHEM 562L.

CHEM 565L, Introduction to Glass Blowing Patrick Vaccaro, Daryl Smith

The course provides a basic introduction to the fabrication of scientific apparatus from glass. Topics covered include laboratory setup, the fundamental skills and techniques of glass blowing, the operation of glass fabrication equipment, and requisite safety procedures.

CHEM 570bu, Quantum Chemistry Victor Batista

The elements of quantum mechanics developed and illustrated with applications in chemistry and chemical physics. TTH 9–10:15

[CHEM 572a, Advanced Quantum Mechanics]

CHEM 590a, Ethical Conduct and Scientific Research Jonathan Parr

A survey of ethical questions relevant to the conduct of research in the sciences with particular emphasis on chemistry. A variety of issues, including plagiarism, the falsification of data, and financial malfeasance, are discussed, using as examples recent cases of misconduct by scientists. Enrollment is restricted to graduate students in chemistry. M 5–5:50

CHEM 600–670, Research Seminars

Presentation of a student’s research results to his/her adviser and fellow research group members. Extensive discussion and literature review are normally a part of the series.

CHEM 700, Laboratory Rotation for First-Year Biophysical and Chemical Biology Graduate Students J. Patrick Loria, Craig Crews

CHEM 720a,b, Current Topics in Organic Chemistry Seth Herzon [Sp]

A seminar series based on invited speakers in the general area of organic chemistry.

CHEM 730, Molecular Science Seminar Mark Johnson

A seminar series based on invited speakers in the areas of physical, inorganic, and biological chemistry.

CHEM 990, Research 

Individual research for Ph.D. degree candidates in the Department of Chemistry, under the direct supervision of one or more faculty members.

Return to Top

Classics

402 Phelps Hall, 203.432.0977

www.yale.edu/classics

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Emily Greenwood

Director of Graduate Studies

Irene Peirano Garrison (307A Phelps, 203.432.8536)

Professors Egbert Bakker, Victor Bers (on leave [Sp]), Kirk Freudenburg (on leave [Sp]), Emily Greenwood (Classics; African American Studies), Verity Harte (Classics; Philosophy), Brad Inwood (on leave [Sp]), Diana Kleiner (Classics; History of Art), Christina Kraus, Noel Lenski (Classics; History; on leave [F]), J.G. Manning (Classics; History; on leave)

Associate Professors Milette Gaifman (Classics; History of Art), Pauline LeVen, Irene Peirano Garrison

Assistant Professor Andrew Johnston

Lecturers Ann Hanson, Jessica Lamont (Visiting), Timothy Robinson, Barbara Shailor (Senior Research Scholar), Joseph Solodow

Affiliated Faculty and Secondary Appointments Harold Attridge (Divinity School), Adela Yarbro Collins (Divinity School; Emerita), John J. Collins (Divinity School), Dimitri Gutas (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations; on leave [Sp]), John Hare (Divinity School), Dale Martin (Religious Studies; on leave), Susan Matheson (Curator of Ancient Art, Art Gallery), David Quint (English; on leave [Sp]), Kathryn Slanski (Humanities; Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), George Syrimis (Hellenic Studies)

Fields of Study

The degree programs in Classics seek to provide an overall knowledge of Greek and Roman civilization, combined with specialized work in a number of fields or disciplines within the total area of classical antiquity.

Admission Requirements

A minimum of three years (four preferred) of college training in one of the classical languages and two years (three preferred) in the other.

Grading and Good Standing

In addition to the Graduate School’s requirement of Honors grades in at least one year course or two term courses, students must have a High Pass average in the remaining courses. Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. is granted upon completion of all predissertation requirements not later than the end of the seventh term of study.

The faculty considers experience in the teaching of language and literature to be an important part of this program. Students in Classics typically teach in their third and fourth years of study.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Classical Philology

  • 1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  • 2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  • 3. Departmental reading examinations in French (or Italian) and German. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the first year, the second by the end of the second year in residence.
  • 4. A minimum of fourteen term courses: (i) two yearlong survey courses in the history of Greek and Latin literature (four courses in total); (ii) at least four seminars, of which two have to be literary seminars in one language, and one in the other; (iii) one course in historical or comparative linguistics; (iv) one course in ancient history (either an 800-level seminar or a 600-level materials course), and one in classical art and archaeology; (v) of these fourteen courses, twelve must be taken in the first two years of study; the last two, which must be 800-level seminars, are to be taken in the third year, normally one in each term.
  • 5. Greek and Latin composition (this requirement may but need not be satisfied by courses taken under [4] above).
  • 6. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the syllabus covered by the survey courses, drawn from the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list. These are to be taken closely following the surveys in the respective literatures, as follows: the first, at the end of the second term (May of the first year), the second at the end of the fourth term (May of the second year).
  • 7. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list, by the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  • 8. Special fields oral examinations will occur at the beginning of the sixth term, and consist of four areas of special concentration selected by the candidate in consultation with the DGS. One of the special fields should be related to the student’s chosen dissertation topic; the three other fields are in each of the two ancient languages/cultures; one historical topic, or a topic with historical potential, is advised. In addition to the oral exam, the student will be asked to write a short summary of the dissertation topic and submit this summary and a working dissertation title to the special fields examiners and to the dissertation adviser (who may or may not have worked on the project as a “special topic” with the student). The summary should discuss where the student’s work stands at the beginning of the term and how the student expects the research will progress over the course of the sixth term as he or she writes the formal dissertation prospectus.
  • 9. A dissertation prospectus by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  • 10. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in Classical Art and Archaeology

The program is designed to give a general knowledge of the development of art and architecture in the classical world from the Bronze Age to Late Antiquity, combined with a detailed study of one particular period and area; and an acquaintance with the contribution made by field archaeology. The program has a strong art historical component, and it is expected that each student will take advantage of available opportunities to visit the major sites and monuments.

  • 1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  • 2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  • 3. Departmental reading examinations in Italian (or French) and German. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the first year, the second by the end of the second year in residence.
  • 4. A minimum of fourteen term courses: (i) a minimum of six courses should be in Greek and/or Roman art and/or archaeology (at least four must be seminars); (ii) a minimum of two courses should be in a related field of the history of art, for example Medieval or Renaissance; (iii) a minimum of two courses should be in Greek or Roman history, numismatics, or papyrology; (iv) students must demonstrate a competence in Greek and Latin, usually by passing at least one 400/700-level course in each language; (v) of the remaining four courses, at least two should be seminars in Greek or Latin literature.
  • 5. A written examination in classical art and archaeology, by the beginning of the sixth term. The examination consists of identifications of works of art and architecture, essays, and a twenty-four-hour research paper, followed by an oral exam in four areas of Greek and Roman art and architecture (time period, locale, genre, free choice), with specific topics within those categories agreed upon in advance by the candidate, adviser, and the DGS in Classics. Consideration is normally given to the probable dissertation topic and the way in which preparation for the orals might enhance the writing of the dissertation prospectus.
  • 6. A dissertation prospectus, normally by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  • 7. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

Combined Programs

Classics and Comparative Literature

Admission requirements Prerequisites for admission through the Department of Classics: same as for Classical Philology. (For admission requirements in the Department of Comparative Literature, consult the DGS of that department.) After admission to the Department of Classics, qualified students may apply to be admitted to this combined program, normally during the first term of residence; the directors of graduate studies of both departments should be consulted before application to the combined program is made.

Requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Classics and Comparative Literature
  • 1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  • 2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  • 3. A minimum of fourteen term courses: (i) at least seven in Classics; (ii) including two yearlong surveys (four courses) in the history of Greek and Latin literature; (iii) two 800-level seminars; (iv) at least six courses in Comparative Literature; (v) including the departmental proseminar; (vi) of these at least four courses should be on postclassical European literature; (vii) of these fourteen courses, twelve must be taken in the first two years of study; the last two, which must be Classics 800-level seminars, are to be taken in the third year, normally one in each term; (viii) the course work across the two programs should include at least two courses on literary theory or methodology, and at least one course each in poetry, narrative fiction, and drama.
  • 4. Literary proficiency in German and in one other modern language, to be demonstrated by the end of the second year in residence.
  • 5. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the syllabus covered by the survey courses, drawn from the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list. These are to be taken closely following the surveys in the respective literatures, as follows: the first, at the end of the second term (May of the first year), the second at the end of the fourth term (May of the second year).
  • 6. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classical Philology Ph.D. reading list, by the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  • 7. An oral examination in the Comparative Literature department on six topics appropriate to both disciplines, selected in consultation with the two directors of graduate studies, balancing a range of kinds of topics and including poetry, narrative fiction, and drama, and at least one significant cluster of postclassical texts, by the middle of the sixth term. One of the topics studied will be related to the student’s dissertation topic.
  • 8. A dissertation prospectus, by the end of the sixth term in residence. The prospectus must be approved by the DGS in each department (and by the Comparative Literature prospectus committee) by the end of the sixth term in residence. At least one dissertation director must come from the Comparative Literature core faculty.
  • 9. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.
Classics and History

The combined degree program in Classics and History, with a concentration in Ancient History, is offered by the Departments of Classics and History for students wishing to pursue graduate study in the history of the ancient Mediterranean and western Eurasia. Prospective students may apply through either the Department of History or the Department of Classics.

The combined degree in Classics and History offers students a comprehensive education in the fundamental skills and most current methodologies in the study of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean and its interaction with Eurasian and African cultures and landscapes. Its object is to train leaders in research and teaching by preparing them to handle the basic materials of ancient history through mastery of the traditional linguistic and technical skills. At the same time the combined degree in Classics and History encourages students to rediscover, reshape, and repurpose traditional and nontraditional source materials using the most up-to-date and sophisticated tools at the historian’s disposal.

Students are called on to complete course work in two ancient languages, historical theory, intra- and interdisciplinary skills, and fundamental research seminars. Interdisciplinary expertise is fostered through the annual seminar coordinated through the Yale Initiative for the Study of Antiquity and the Premodern World (YISAP) and through required study in ancillary fields. Exams are rigorous and aimed at helping students hone skills and explore new terrain in ancient studies. Students are encouraged to take advantage of Yale’s superior collections and library resources in order to explore new avenues in their learning and approaches to historical problems. Yale’s outstanding faculty in Classics, History, and related disciplines, such as Near Eastern languages and cultures, religious studies, art history, and anthropology, work together to ensure broad and deep learning that will enable our students to become world leaders in the field.

Admission requirements Prerequisites for admission through the Department of Classics are the same as for admission to the Classics degree program, i.e., the equivalent of three years (four preferred) of college training in one of the classical languages and two years (three preferred) in the other. Prerequisites for admission through the Department of History are the equivalent of three years (four preferred) of college training in one of the classical languages and two years in another ancient language, not necessarily Greek or Latin.

Requirements for the combined Ph.D. degree in Classics and History
  • 1. A minimum of fourteen term courses, including: (i) the historical methods and theory course, Approaching History (HIST 500); (ii) YISAP core seminar (CLSS 815 or equivalent); (iii) two graduate-level courses in two separate ancient languages. For students who are admitted in Classics, these must be Greek and Latin. Students who are admitted in History must study either Greek or Latin, and they may study both but may also choose another ancient language to fulfill this requirement. The surveys of Greek and Latin literature offered by Classics are encouraged but not mandatory for fulfillment of this requirement; (iv) two skills courses. These may include topics selected from epigraphy (epigraphy courses may be used to fulfill the language requirement concurrently); archaeology; art history; papyrology; numismatics; digital data, GIS, digital humanities, vel sim.; an advanced course in a non-classical ancient language (no more than one such course may be used in fulfillment of this requirement). Students are also encouraged to take advantage of educational opportunities outside of Yale (American Numismatic Society Summer Seminar; an archaeological excavation, e.g., the Gabii project); (v) four courses (at least two of which must be research seminars) in the history of the ancient Mediterranean world; historical courses that have a heavy skill component may be used concurrently to fulfill the skills requirement; (vi) two courses outside of ancient Mediterranean history that cover two separate disciplinary areas. These courses will be in the history of different periods or different regions, or in other disciplines of the humanities or social sciences outside of history, or in the physical sciences. Possibilities include (but are not limited to): social sciences (economics, anthropology, sociology, environmental science, statistics); religion (religious studies, Divinity School, Jewish studies); law (history of law, comparative law, international law); Near Eastern languages and civilizations (Egyptian language, Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, Arabic); anthropology and archaeology (cultural anthropology, archaeological sciences); physical and biological sciences (paleoclimatology, ecology and forestry, genetics, medicine).
  • 2. Classics proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines, to be taken in the first year in residence (not for credit).
  • 3. Reading examinations in German, and in either French or Italian. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the second term in residence, the second by the end of the fourth term in residence.
  • 4. Translation examinations in two ancient languages. For students admitted through Classics, these must be Greek and Latin. For students admitted through History, at least one must be either Greek or Latin. Greek and Latin examinations will be based on the Ancient History Greek and Latin reading lists and will consist of four passages in each language, at least one of which will be poetry and one documentary (epigraphy/papyrology). Some History students may find that expertise in another language—such as Hebrew, Aramaic/Syriac, Demotic, Coptic, Classical Armenian, or Sanskrit—is most beneficial for their research and teaching trajectory. Reading lists for these non-classical languages will be devised by the student in collaboration with the faculty adviser and other relevant member(s) of the Yale faculty, and fixed in writing no later than the end of the fourth term in residence. Examinations in these languages will also consist of four passages to be set and evaluated by faculty expert in the given language. Translation exams in all languages must be taken at the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  • 5. A general examination in Ancient History during the third year and no later than the end of the sixth term in residence. This is to be broken into one major and two minor fields. For the major field students must prepare an 8,000-word essay in advance of the oral examination. For each of the minor fields, students must prepare a syllabus for an undergraduate class. The written essays and syllabi must be submitted by a fixed date, typically on the Friday before Thanksgiving or spring break. Oral exams will be completed shortly afterward to ensure time for the completion of the dissertation prospectus.
  • 6. A dissertation prospectus by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  • 7. By the end of their ninth term, students are required to submit a chapter of their dissertation, which will be discussed with the student by the committee in a chapter conference.
Classics and Philosophy

The Classics and Philosophy Program is a combined program, offered by the Departments of Classics and Philosophy, for students wishing to pursue graduate study in ancient philosophy. Suitably qualified students may apply for entry to the program either through the Classics department for the Classics track, details of which are given below, or through the Philosophy department for the Philosophy track, details of which may be found at http://philosophy.yale.edu/graduate-program/classics-and-philosophy-program. Applicants to the combined program are strongly encouraged to submit a writing sample on a topic in ancient philosophy.

Applicants for the Classics track of the combined program must satisfy the general requirements for admission to the Classics graduate program, in addition to the requirements of the Classics track of the combined program. Applicants for the Philosophy track of the combined program must satisfy the general requirements for admission to the Philosophy graduate program, in addition to the requirements of the Philosophy track of the combined program.

The combined program is overseen by an interdepartmental committee currently consisting of Verity Harte, David Charles, and Brad Inwood together with the DGS in Classics and the DGS in Philosophy.

Requirements of the Classics track of the Classics and Philosophy Program
  • 1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  • 2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  • 3. Departmental reading examinations in French (or Italian) and German. The first (in either language) is to be passed by the end of the first year, the second by the end of the second year in residence.
  • 4. A minimum of fourteen term courses, of which (i) at least four should be in ancient philosophy, including at least two involving original language work; (ii) of ten remaining courses, five should be in Classics, five in Philosophy, including (a) of five in Classics, either two terms of history of Greek literature or two terms of history of Latin literature are required, and two courses at 700/800-level in Greek or Latin; and (b) of five in Philosophy, one in history of philosophy other than ancient philosophy, three in nonhistorical philosophy. It is recommended that students without formal training in logic take a logic course appropriate to their philosophical background.
  • 5. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classics and Philosophy Ph.D. reading list for the Classics track of the program, by the beginning of the fifth term in residence.
  • 6. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the Classics and Philosophy Ph.D. reading list for the Classics track of the program, by the end of the fifth term in residence and consisting of one hourlong oral examination on nonphilosophical Greek and Latin works from the list (which may be taken in two parts, one half-hour exam on Greek and one half-hour exam on Latin) and one hourlong oral examination on philosophical Greek and Latin works from the list, to be completed by the end of the fifth term in residence. Students may choose to take the nonphilosophical Greek and/or Latin half-hour component of their oral examination in conjunction with taking the history of Greek or Latin literature, along with the Classical Philology cohort, in May of the year in which the corresponding history is taken.
  • 7. One of the two qualifying papers required for the Ph.D. in Philosophy by the end of the sixth term in residence; this paper should be on a philosophical topic other than ancient philosophy.
  • 8. Oral examinations/special fields in two areas of concentration selected by the candidate in consultation with the DGS in Classics and the program committee, one of which must be in ancient philosophy and which will in addition include a written component, while the other must cover a classical topic other than ancient philosophy, by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  • 9. A dissertation prospectus, by the end of the seventh term in residence.
  • 10. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.
Classics and Renaissance Studies

Admission requirements Same as for Classical Philology. Applications should be submitted directly to Classics with an indication that the student wishes to apply for the combined degree in Classics and Renaissance Studies.

Requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Classics and Renaissance Studies
  • 1. Diagnostic sight translations in Greek and Latin (these are taken before the beginning of the first and third terms and are meant to assess the student’s proficiency and progress in both languages).
  • 2. A proseminar offering an introduction to the discipline of Classics and its various subdisciplines.
  • 3. Sixteen term courses, divided equally between Classics and Renaissance Studies: (i) eight courses in Classics; (ii) including two yearlong surveys (four courses) of Greek and Latin literature; (iii) at least three seminars; (iv) eight courses in Renaissance Studies; (v) two terms of the Renaissance Studies Core Course; (vi) six additional term courses to be taken in at least two disciplines (such as literature, history, history of art, music, religious studies, etc.); one of these courses should meet the normal Classics requirements of a course in classical art or archaeology; (vii) of these sixteen courses, fourteen must be taken in the first two years of study; the last two, which must be Classics 800-level seminars, are to be taken in the third year, normally one in each term.
  • 4. Literary proficiency in Italian, as examined by Renaissance Studies, and in a second language, normally German or French.
  • 5. Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the syllabus covered by the survey courses, drawn from the Classics and Renaissance Studies Ph.D. reading list. These are to be taken closely following the surveys in the respective literatures, as follows: the first, at the end of the second term (May of the first year), the second at the end of the fourth term (May of the second year).
  • 6. Translation examinations in Greek and Latin, based on the Classics and Renaissance Studies Ph.D. reading list, by the end of the fifth term in residence.
  • 7. Oral examinations on special fields appropriate to both disciplines, by the beginning of the sixth term. Seventy-five minutes on three or four topics in classical Greek and Latin literature; and forty-five minutes (three fifteen-minute questions) on Renaissance topics to be divided between at least two disciplines, i.e., literature, history, history of art, etc., selected in consultation with the directors of graduate studies in both disciplines. One of the fields studied will be related to the student’s dissertation topic. In addition to the oral exam, the student will be asked to write a short summary of his or her dissertation topic and submit this summary and a working dissertation title to the special fields examiners and to the dissertation adviser (who may or may not have worked on the project as a “special topic” with the student). The summary should discuss where the student’s work stands at the beginning of the term and how the student expects the research will progress over the course of the sixth term as he or she writes the formal dissertation prospectus.
  • 8. A dissertation prospectus, by the end of the sixth term in residence.
  • 9. A dissertation. All students at the end of each term of dissertation research and writing will present their work in progress in a “chapter colloquium,” which will mimic the prospectus defense in format (i.e., a discussion with interested faculty of a presubmitted chunk of written work). If no chapter or written work is presentable at the time of the colloquium, the student would have to justify this.

For information about the Ph.D. program in Greco-Arabic Studies, please contact Professor Gutas, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.

YISAP Graduate Qualification

The Yale Initiative for the Study of Antiquity and the Premodern World (YISAP) offers a graduate qualification. For further information, see YISAP, under Non-Degree-Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.A. The Department of Classics does not admit students for a terminal master’s degree, nor does it award an M.A. en route to the Ph.D. degree. If, however, a student admitted for the Ph.D. leaves the program prior to completion of the doctoral degree, he or she may be eligible to receive a terminal master’s degree upon completion of eight courses, ordinarily with a High Pass average in two successive terms.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Classics, Yale University, PO Box 208266, New Haven CT 06520-8266.

Courses

GREK 719bU, Helen after Troy Pauline LeVen

Focus on the representation of Helen of Troy in Homer, Sappho, and other lyric poets. Readings from Gorgias’s Encomium of Helen, Euripides’ Helen, and Longus. Attention to problems of aesthetics, rhetoric, and poetics. MW 1–2:15

GREK 761aU, Ancient Greek Wisdom Poetry Egbert Bakker

Study and interpretation of archaic Greek poetry that is explicitly addressed to its audience, in the form of advice, exhortation, or general instruction. The course focuses on Hesiod’s Works and Days, the traditional prototype of “didactic poetry,” and on archaic Greek elegy (Solon, Theognis, Tyrtaeus). Issues to be addressed include questions of genre, occasion, and performance context as well as the relation of this kind of poetry to the epic tradition. MW 11:35–12:50

GREK 790aU, Greek Syntax and Stylistics Victor Bers

Stylistics analysis and extended prose composition in imitation of particular genres and “subgenres,” concentrating on classical Attic prose. Students enrolled in this course are normally required to attend and do the work in GREK 390a, a review of accidence and syntax, elementary composition, and stylistic analysis of Greek prose of the fifth and fourth centuries B.C., including a comparison of “prosaic” and “poetic” syntax. TTH 9–10:15, TH 10:30–11:20

LATN 721bU, Vergil’s AeneidChristina Kraus

An in-depth study of Vergil’s Aeneid within its political context. TTH 9–10:15

LATN 724aU/CPLT 594a, Latin Lyric Christina Kraus

Reading and analysis of selections from the canon of Latin lyric poetry. Focus on Horace’s Odes, with some attention to his Epodes and to works by Catullus and lesser-known Republican poets. Emphasis on literary interpretation. MW 9–10:15

LATN 763aU, Ciceronian Invective Irene Peirano Garrison

A close reading of Cicero’s Philippic 2 and selections from the In Pisonem; selected readings from other representatives of the genre of Roman invective. Emphasis on Cicero’s language, style, and rhetorical technique, and on invective as a literary genre. MW 1–2:15

LATN 785bU, Poetry and Monarchy at Rome Andrew Johnston

The monarchy at Rome from the Augustan age through late antiquity, as illuminated by the writings of poets who variously flattered and subverted the “principes” and emperors, collaborating with their ideological programs or problematizing their position within the republic. Study of bucolic, epic, didactic, panegyric, epigram, and lyric poetry from the ages of Augustus, the Flavians, and Theodosius. Topics include questions of tradition and innovation, further voices, society and patronage, and revision and erasure. TTH 11:35–12:50

LATN 790bU, Latin Syntax and Stylistics Joseph Solodow

A systematic review of syntax and an introduction to Latin style. Selections from Latin prose authors are read and analyzed, and students compose short pieces of Latin prose. For students with some experience reading Latin literature who desire a better foundation in forms, syntax, idiom, and style. MW 2:30–3:45

CLSS 601aU/MDVL 571a, Introduction to Latin Paleography Raymond Clemens

Latin paleography from the fourth century C.E. to ca. 1500. Topics include the history and development of national hands; the introduction and evolution of Caroline minuscule, pre-gothic, gothic, and humanist scripts (both cursive and book hands); the production, circulation, and transmission of texts (primarily Latin, with reference to Greek and Middle English); advances in the technical analysis and digital manipulation of manuscripts. Seminars are based on the examination of codices and fragments in the Beinecke Library; students select a manuscript for class presentation and final paper. M 3:30–5:20

CLSS 602bU/MDVL 563b, Advanced Latin Paleography Barbara Shailor

The challenges of using hand-produced Latin manuscripts in research, with an emphasis on texts from the late Middle Ages. Gothic cursive scripts and book hands ca. 1200–ca. 1500; fragments of unidentified codices; complex or composite codices with heavy interlinear and marginal annotations. Manuscripts and fragments selected largely from collections in the Beinecke Library. Prerequisite: CLSS 601a or permission of the instructor. M 3:30–5:20

CLSS 605bU, Greek Papyrology Ann Hanson

Literary and documentary papyri of Greek and Roman Egypt, concentrating on documents housed in the Beinecke Library from the late Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Topics include using papyri as sources for social and other histories; gaining familiarity with the language of the papyri; and the reading of literary and documentary hands. F 2:30–4:20

CLSS 609bU/PHIL 609bU, Plato’s PhilebusVerity Harte

Discussion of Plato’s Philebus (in translation), the late work in which he examines the competing claims of pleasure and reason to be the basis of human happiness and in which he provides a portrait of the best human life. M 1:30–3:20

CLSS 620bU/PHIL 607bU, The Central Books of Aristotle’s MetaphysicsDavid Charles

Examination of Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Discussion of substance and essence in the central books, Z, H, and Θ, and assessment of recent attempts to interpret his account. Prerequisites: previous study of ancient philosophy and permission of the instructor. W 3:30–5:20

CLSS 803a, Problems in the History of the Late Republic Andrew Johnston

This seminar explores a range of key questions and problems in the history of the late Roman Republic (from the death of G. Gracchus to the death of Cicero): growing anxieties over the definition(s) of Roman identity; the relationship of Rome to the Latins and Italians; attitudes toward Greek culture and imperial policy in the East; the nature of Republican imperialism in the western Mediterranean; the politics of elite self-representation; antiquarianism, intellectual culture, and the transformation of religion; social memory and the representation of the past; oratory, popular politics, and mass communication; retrospective views of the “Republic” from the empire; and others. The course takes a thematic approach, tackling a new question/problem each week, each building on the previous one. Discussion of trends in modern scholarship, both foundational works (Syme, Gruen, Taylor) as well as the cutting edge and important new directions. Close engagement with primary sources and their problems, especially Cicero and Caesar, as well as the fragments of Roman historiography and oratory, and inscribed documents; the use of archaeological evidence to answer historical questions. TH 2:30–4:20

CLSS 815b/ANTH 531b/ARCG 531b/CPLT 547b/HIST 502b/JDST 653b/NELC 533b/RLST 803b, Fakes, Forgeries, and the Making of Antiquity Eckart Frahm, Irene Peirano Garrison

A comparative exploration of notions of forgery and authenticity in the ancient and premodern worlds, in a variety of civilizations (ancient Greece, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, China, India, etc.) and different political, religious, literary, and artistic contexts. Emphasis is also placed on the pivotal role played by the “authentic” in the modern era in disciplines such as philology and aesthetics, the manipulative uses of ancient history for purposes of modern nation building and identity formation, copies and reconstructions of ancient artifacts, and the role of forgeries in today’s antiquities trade. TH 2:30–4:30

CLSS 843a/PHIL 733a, Readings in Greek Philosophy: Plato’s PhaedoVerity Harte, Brad Inwood

The course reads and discusses the Greek text of Plato’s Phaedo, set on the last day of Socrates’ life. The Phaedo is notable for a series of arguments for the immortality of soul and for discussions of the Forms, the acquisition of knowledge, philosophical method, and the value of philosophy. This is a core course for the combined Ph.D. program in Classics and Philosophy. Prerequisite: the course is open to all Classics or Philosophy graduate students who have suitable preparation in Attic Greek and some prior study of ancient philosophy. Others interested in taking or attending the class must have the permission of the instructor. W 3:30–5:20

CLSS 846a/ARCG 749a/HSAR 570a, Becoming Hadrian: Autobiography and Art in the Second-Century A.D. Diana Kleiner

Marguerite Yourcenar’s famed fictional Memoirs of Hadrian serves as the starting point for an exploration of Hadrian and the art he commissioned in Rome and abroad. Hadrian’s passion for life, quest after peace, romantic wanderlust, veneration of Greek culture, and craving for love, along with his acceptance of death’s inexorableness, led him to commission some of Rome’s greatest monuments. The emperor’s flair for leadership and talent as an amateur architect inform student projects on the sculpture, mosaics, and buildings of the age, among them the portraiture of Hadrian’s lover Antinous, the Pantheon, and Hadrian’s Wall in Britain. Qualified undergraduates who have taken HSAR 250a and/or HSAR 252a may be admitted with permission of the instructor. T 1:30–3:20

CLSS 864b/HSAR 563b, Art and Ritual in Greek Antiquity Milette Gaifman

The relationship between art and ritual has received much scholarly attention in various fields, particularly classics, history of art, religious studies, and anthropology. Greek antiquity offers an ideal context for considering the intricate ties between visual culture and religious practices, for much of what is known today as ancient Greek art and architecture was originally related to rituals; artifacts and architectural monuments such as painted pottery, sculptural reliefs, and temples served as settings for worship and ceremonial events and featured representations of activities such as libations and sacrifices. The seminar explores how works of art and architecture shaped ancient practices and theologies. While examining closely ancient artifacts and monuments, students consider the most recent theoretical frames related to the subject from various schools of thought such as the Paris school, British anthropology, and Bildwissenschaft. W 2:30–4:20

CLSS 873a, The Satiric Worlds of Martial and Juvenal Kirk Freudenburg

This course takes up the two most famous writers of critical poetry in the period that saw the Flavian dynasty give way to the age of “good emperors,” such as Nerva and Trajan. We look at how Martial writes from both sides of that great divide, and how Juvenal in his Satires writes about deplorable events that have already been “workshopped” by Martial in his Epigrams. We look at the kinds of “free speech acts” that each puts on, and the valence that these acts had, or did not have, as politically engaged (and risky) speech. Effort is invested in finding “horizontal” structures from which to make sense of these poems in Flavian and early second-century Rome. F 9:25–11:15

CLSS 881a, Proseminar: Classical Studies Irene Peirano Garrison

An introduction to the bibliography and disciplines of classical scholarship. Faculty address larger questions of method and theory, as well as specialized subdisciplines such as linguistics, papyrology, epigraphy, paleography, and numismatics. Required of all entering graduate students. T 11:35–12:50

CLSS 896a, History of Greek Literature I Pauline LeVen

A comprehensive treatment of Greek literature from Homer to the imperial period, with an emphasis on archaic and Hellenistic poetry. The course prepares for the comprehensive oral qualifying examinations. The student is expected to read extensively in the original language, working toward familiarity with the range and variety of the literature. MW 2:30–3:45, M 1:30–2:20

CLSS 897b, History of Greek Literature II Egbert Bakker

A continuation of CLSS 896a. MW 9–10:15, 1 HTBA

CLSS 900a/b, Directed Reading

By arrangement with faculty.

CLSS 910a/b, Directed Reading

By arrangement with faculty.

Return to Top

Comparative Literature

451 College Street, Rm. 202, 203.432.2760

http://complit.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Martin Hägglund

Director of Graduate Studies

Marta Figlerowicz [F]

Ayesha Ramachandran [Sp]

Professors Dudley Andrew, Katerina Clark, Roberto González Echevarría, Martin Hägglund, Hannan Hever, Carol Jacobs (on leave [F]), David Quint, Katie Trumpener (on leave [F]), Jing Tsu

Associate Professor Moira Fradinger

Assistant Professors Robyn Creswell (on leave [F]), Marta Figlerowicz, Ayesha Ramachandran (on leave [F])

Lecturers Peter Cole, Jan Hagens

Emeritus Peter Brooks, Peter Demetz, Shoshana Feldman, Michael Holquist, Rainer Nägele

Affiliated Faculty Rolena Adorno (Spanish & Portuguese), R. Howard Bloch (French), Rüdiger Campe (German; on leave [F]), Francesco Casetti (Film & Media Studies; on leave [Sp]), Kang-I Sun Chang (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Michael Denning (American Studies), Wai Chee Dimock (English), Paul Fry (English; on leave [F]), Karsten Harries (Philosophy), Pericles Lewis (Yale-NUS College), Tinu Lu (East Asian Languages & Literatures), John MacKay (Slavic Languages & Literatures; on leave [F]), Giuseppe Mazzotta (Italian; on leave), Christopher Miller (French; on leave [Sp]), Joseph Roach (English), Maurice Samuels (French), Henry Sussman (Visiting; German), Ruth Bernard Yeazell (English)

Fields of Study

The Department of Comparative Literature introduces students to the study and understanding of literature beyond linguistic or national boundaries; the theory, interpretation, and criticism of literature; and its interactions with adjacent fields like visual and material culture, linguistics, film, psychology, law, and philosophy. The comparative perspective invites the exploration of such transnational phenomena as literary or cultural periods and trends (Renaissance, Romanticism, Modernism, postcolonialism) or genres and modes of discourse. Students may specialize in any cultures or languages, to the extent that they are sufficiently covered at Yale. The Ph.D. degree qualifies the candidate to teach comparative literature as well as the national literature(s) of her or his specialization.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants must hold a B.A. or equivalent degree and should normally have majored in comparative literature, English, a classical or foreign literature, or in an interdepartmental major that includes literature. They must be ready to take advanced courses in two foreign literatures in addition to English upon admission. The GRE General Test is required. A ten- to twenty-page writing sample, written in English, should be submitted with the application.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students must successfully complete fourteen term courses, including the departmental proseminar and at least six further courses listed under the departmental heading. The student’s overall schedule must fulfill the following requirements: (1) at least one course in medieval or classical European literature, philology, or linguistics (or their equivalents in other cultures); one course in the Renaissance or Baroque (or equivalents); and one course in the modern period; (2) three courses in literary theory or methodology; (3) at least one course each in poetry, narrative fiction, and drama; (4) course work that deals with texts from three literatures, one of which may be English or American; and (5) a substantive focus on one or two national or language-based literatures. Any course may be counted for several requirements simultaneously.

Languages Literary proficiency in four languages (including English, at least one other modern language, and one classical or ancient language, such as Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Classical Arabic, Classical Chinese, Provençal). The fulfillment of this requirement will be demonstrated by a written exam consisting of a translation of a literary or critical text, to be held by the end of the sixth term; or by an equivalent level in the student’s course work.

Orals An oral examination to be taken in the third year of studies, demonstrating both the breadth and specialization as well as the comparative scope of the student’s acquired knowledge. The examination consists of six topics that include texts from at least three national literatures and several historical periods (at least one modern and one before the Renaissance). The texts discussed should also include representatives of the three traditional literary genres (poetry, drama, narrative fiction).

Ph.D. dissertation Supervised by a dissertation director (or directors)—at least one from the core or affiliate departmental faculty—and approved by the departmental faculty at large, the dissertation completes the degree. Its initial step is a dissertation prospectus, to be submitted and approved by the dissertation director and a standing faculty committee no later than halfway through the seventh term of study. Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. is granted after six terms of residence and the completion of all requirements (courses, languages, orals, prospectus) except the dissertation.

Teaching Training in teaching, through teaching fellowships, is an important part of every student’s program. Normally students will teach in their third and fourth years.

Combined Ph.D. Programs

Comparative Literature and Classics

Course work Students concentrating in Comparative Literature and Classics are required to complete fourteen graduate term courses (plus the Classics proseminar). In Classics, at least seven courses, including the Classics proseminar and four courses (two yearlong sequences) in the history of Greek and Latin literature (usually taken in successive years, each to be followed by the respective oral in that field) and two 800-level Classics seminars (generally taken in each term of the third year). In Comparative Literature, the departmental proseminar and at least five further Comparative Literature courses, including at least four courses in postclassical European literature. The course work across the two programs should also include at least two courses in literary theory or methodology, and at least one course each in poetry, narrative fiction, and drama. At least two courses, excluding directed readings, need to receive the grade of Honors. At least thirteen of the fifteen required courses are to be taken in the first two years; the last two, which must be Classics 800-level seminars, are to be taken in the third year, normally one in each term.

Languages To assess each student’s proficiency and progress in both key languages, two sight translation examinations each in Greek and Latin (taken before the beginning of the first and third terms). During the first two years, literary proficiency, demonstrated in course work, in Greek, Latin, and English, as well as reading proficiency in German and one other modern language (usually French).

Orals Classics: Oral examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the Classics Ph.D. reading list. These are to be taken closely following the surveys in the respective literatures, as follows: the first, at the end of the second term (May of the first year), the second at the end of the fourth term (May of the second year). By the end of the fifth term, translation examinations in Greek and Latin literature, based on the Classics Ph.D. reading list. Comparative Literature: oral examination (six topics appropriate to both disciplines, balancing a range of kinds of topics and including poetry, narrative fiction, and drama, and at least one significant cluster of postclassical texts), to be taken by the middle of the sixth term. Lists will be worked out with individual examiners, primarily under the guidance of the Comparative Literature DGS, but also with the approval of the Classics DGS. One of the topics studied will be relevant to the student’s planned dissertation topic.

Prospectus and dissertation The prospectus must be approved by the DGS in each department (and by the Comparative Literature prospectus committee) by the end of the sixth term in residence. At least one dissertation director must come from the Comparative Literature core faculty. At the end of each term, each dissertation student will presubmit, then discuss their work in progress in a Classics “chapter colloquium” discussion with interested faculty.

Comparative Literature and Film and Media Studies

Applicants to the combined program must indicate on their application that they are applying both to the program in Film and Media Studies and to Comparative Literature. All documentation within the application should include this information.

Course work Students in the combined program are required to complete fifteen graduate term courses. In Comparative Literature, the proseminar and at least five further courses, including at least one course in literary theory or methodology beyond the pro­seminar; at least one course each in poetry, narrative fiction, and drama; two courses before 1900, including at least one before 1800; a wide range of courses with a focus on one or two national or language-based literatures; and at least two courses with the grade of Honors. In Film and Media Studies, two core seminars (FILM 601 and FILM 603) and four additional seminars.

Languages At least two languages (besides English) with excellent reading ability (normally one of these languages is French).

Orals Students must pass the Film and Media Studies oral examination. They must also pass the six-field Comparative Literature oral examination, with at least one examiner from the core Comparative Literature faculty; at least three fields involving literary topics, and readings including poetry, fiction, and drama; the other topics may be on film or film-related subjects; some lists may combine film and literature.

Prospectus and dissertation At least one dissertation director must be from Comparative Literature and at least one from Film and Media Studies (in some cases, a single adviser may fulfill both roles). The prospectus must be approved by the Comparative Literature subcommittee and ratified by the Film and Media Studies faculty. The dissertation must pass a presubmission Public Defense of Work (with at least one examiner from the graduate Film and Media Studies committee, and at least one member from Comparative Literature).

Comparative Literature and Renaissance Studies

Course work Students are required to complete sixteen graduate term courses, at least seven of these (including the Comparative Literature proseminar) in the Department of Comparative Literature. Students must take at least ten courses in the field of Renaissance Studies (offered in several departments), including two terms of the Renaissance Studies core seminar and three courses in two disciplines other than literature (such as history, history of art, or religious studies). At least three of a student’s overall list of courses must be in literary theory, criticism, or methodology; at least one course each in poetry, narrative fiction, and drama; and at least one course each in ancient or medieval literature and Enlightenment or modern literature. At least two courses must be completed with the grade of Honors. In general, students should take a wide range of courses with a focus on one or two national or language-based literatures.

Languages Latin and Italian, as set by Renaissance Studies—one hour of Renaissance Latin prose; one hour of sixteenth-century Italian prose, one of modern Italian scholarship—and two additional languages, at least one of them European.

Orals The joint oral examination will consist of seven twenty-minute questions (two topics in Renaissance literature from a comparative perspective; three on non-Renaissance literature, including at least one theoretical or critical question; and two questions on Renaissance topics in nonliterary disciplines). Orals should be completed no later than the end of the sixth term.

Prospectus and dissertation The prospectus should be completed in September of the fourth year. Procedures regarding the dissertation will follow departmental practice, although the final readers will normally include at least one member of the Renaissance Studies Executive Committee.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations. Additionally, students in Comparative Literature are eligible to pursue a supplemental M.Phil. degree in Medieval Studies. For further details, see Medieval Studies.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program may receive the M.A. upon completion of ten courses with at least two grades of Honors and a maximum of three grades of Pass, and the demonstration of proficiency in two of the languages, ancient or modern, through course work or departmental examinations. No student is admitted to a terminal M.A.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Yale University, PO Box 208299, New Haven CT 06520-8299, or stacey.hampton@yale.edu.

Courses

CPLT 511bU, Introduction to Theory of Literature Martin Hägglund

An examination of concepts and assumptions in contemporary views of literature. Theories of meaning, interpretation, and representation. Critical analysis of formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, poststructuralist, Marxist, and feminist approaches to theory and to literature. MW 3:30–4:20

CPLT 513a/FREN 933a, One Hundred Years of Swann’s WayAlice Kaplan

The first volume of Proust’s Recherche has inspired generations of literary critics, psychoanalysts, philosophers, historians, translators, and critical theorists. Reading Du côté de chez Swann in light of their responses to the novel allows us to construct an intellectual and literary history of a century of reading Proust. TH 9:25–11:15

CPLT 515b, Proseminar in Comparative Literature Katie Trumpener

Introductory proseminar for all first-year students in Comparative Literature (and other interested graduate students). Reflections and exercises that aim to grasp the roots and follow developments of this discipline, such as philology, thematics, historical poetics, hermeneutics, deconstruction, translation theory, comparative arts, world literature. Offered every other year. M 1–3

CPLT 521a/FILM 609a, Issues in World Literature and Cinema Dudley Andrew

Can there be disciplinary areas named “World Literature” and “World Cinema,” or does the adjective “world” defy perimeters? What about competing adjectives like international, transnational, global, planetary, etc.? Undergraduate courses and textbooks with “world” in their titles have proliferated this century, but what are they aiming to define, organize, and explore? What topics, principles, methods, and conundrums do they address? This seminar aims to quickly survey the history of the “world quest” of literary studies from Goethe to Moretti, and to see if the more recent shift from International to World Cinema marks a parallel quest or something entirely different. Students debate positions taken by literary scholars (Damrosch, Casanova, Spivak, Prendergast, et al.) and by a phalanx of film scholars. We investigate infrastructure (festivals, translation, subtitles, prizes) via the kind of collaborative effort often required by the scale of this “area.” Meanwhile each student develops an essay on one problem lurking today in literary or film history as these fields are pushed to their geographical limit. Questions could concern corpus, system, distribution, influence, translation, mediation, genre, etc. W 9:25–11:15

CPLT 546a/EALL 846a, Philology and Sinology Jing Tsu

In this course we examine the history and theoretical foundations of non-Western philology in relation to Western philology and linguistics. We study how they interacted and the development of comparative methods based on notions of sameness and difference. T 1:30–3:20

CPLT 547b/ANTH 531b/ARCG 531b/CLSS 815b/HIST 502b/JDST 653b/NELC 533b/RLST 803b, Fakes, Forgeries, and the Making of Antiquity Eckart Frahm, Irene Peirano Garrison

A comparative exploration of notions of forgery and authenticity in the ancient and premodern world, in a variety of civilizations (ancient Greece, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, China, India, etc.) and different political, religious, literary, and artistic contexts. Emphasis is also placed on the pivotal role played by the “authentic” in the modern era in disciplines such as philology and aesthetics, the manipulative uses of ancient history for purposes of modern nation building and identity formation, copies and reconstructions of ancient artifacts, and the role of forgeries in today’s antiquities trade. TH 2:30–4:30

CPLT 560bU/GMAN 559bU, Rilke and Yeats Carol Jacobs

Study of the works of two twentieth-century authors who, in very different ways, challenge conventional modes in which to think about the relationship between literature and what we tend to call reality. We ask how to think about the performance of art and its implicit theorizations as crucial to this issue, and ponder the difference between the commitment to and lack of interest in a thematics of lived life. The nature and purpose of the course are to practice close reading as a mode of thinking and a path to theorizing. We explore how that theorization of the text takes place, not in a separate sphere, but out of the details and performance of individual literary works. Although our classes settle on individual works, students are expected to read much more widely in the corpus of the two poets.

CPLT 582a/ENGL 545a/FREN 802a, Medieval Translation Ardis Butterfield

Using modern postcolonial as well as medieval theories of translation, memory, and bilingualism we explore how texts are transformed, cited, and reinvented in the medieval period. What happens to language under the pressure of crosslingual reading practices? How can the freedom and inventiveness of medieval poetic practices illuminate modern theories of translation? Texts include material in French, English, Latin, and Italian. Proficiency in any one or more of these languages is welcome, but every effort will be made to use texts available in modern English translation, so as to include as wide a participation as possible in the course. W 9:25–11:15

CPLT 594a/LATN 724aU, Latin Lyric Christina Kraus

Reading and analysis of selections from the canon of Latin lyric poetry. Focus on Horace’s Odes, with some attention to his Epodes and to works by Catullus and lesser-known Republican poets. Emphasis on literary interpretation. MW 9–10:15

CPLT 622a,b/AMST 622a/623b, Working Group on Globalization and Culture  Michael Denning

A continuing collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory,” that has been running since the fall of 2003. The group, made up of graduate students and faculty from several disciplines, meets regularly to discuss common readings, to develop collective and individual research projects, and to present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences for patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change. There are a small number of openings for second-year graduate students. Students interested in participating should contact michael.denning@yale.edu. M 1:30–3:20

CPLT 651bU/GMAN 647bU/PHIL 606bU, Systems and Their Theory  Henry Sussman

Conceptual systems that have, since the outset of modernity, furnished a format and platform for rigorous thinking at the same time that they have imposed on language the attributes of self-reflexivity, consistency, repetition, purity, and dependability. Texts by Kant, Hegel, Bergson, Kafka, Proust, and Borges.

CPLT 670a/ENGL 548a/ITAL 601a, Ariosto and Cervantes David Quint

The year 2016 marks the 500th anniversary of the Orlando furioso and the 400th anniversary of the death of Cervantes. This course reads the Orlando furioso, Ariosto’s Cinque canti, and Don Quijote as depictions of the crisis of chivalry, and it charts, in the case of Don Quijote, the birth of the modern novel. It examines the use in these works of mirroring episodes—entrelacement—and interpolated tales. It also looks at similar techniques in Apuleius’s The Golden Ass, in the Thousand and One Nights, and in Sir Philip Sidney’s New Arcadia. T 10:30–12:20

CPLT 678bU/AFAM 660bU/AFST 678bU/ENGL 938bU/JDST 678bU, The Literatures of Blacks and Jews in the Twentieth Century Marc Kaplan

This seminar compares representative writings by African, Caribbean, and African American authors of the past one hundred years, together with European, American, and South African Jewish authors writing in Yiddish, Hebrew, French, and English. This comparison examines the paradoxically central role played by minority, “marginal” groups in the creation of modern literature and the articulation of the modern experience. TH 1:30–3:20

CPLT 682bU/JDST 851bU/NELC 854bU, Cultural Critique and Israel Hannan Hever

An overview of the poetics, culture, history, and political dynamics of modern Hebrew literature as a national literature over the past three hundred years. No background in Jewish literature and Jewish culture is required. All readings in English. T 1:30–3:20

CPLT 685bU/JDST 850bU/NELC 853bU, Literature at the Limit: Palestine and Israel  Hannan Hever, Robyn Creswell

Readings and films from post-1948 Palestine and Israel, with special attention to historical and political contexts. This course focuses on Hebrew- and Arabic-language culture produced in Palestine and Israel since the year of the Palestinian Haqba and the Jewish War of Independence. These poems, novels, and films consistently probe the figure of the limit—in the geographical sense of borders and checkpoints, as well as in the existential sense of extremity and trauma. What are the limits of one’s political and linguistic community? What is the role of culture in defining, deconstructing, or bridging those borders? The course is intended to serve as an introduction to canonical texts of both national traditions, as well as the methods of comparative literature. Readings include works by Darwish, Yehoshua, Kanafani, Oz, Habibi, Ballas, and Shammas. All readings in English. W 2:30–4:20

CPLT 687aU/JDST 849aU/RLST 823aU, Ethnicity, Religion, and Nationality in Modern Jewish Culture Hannan Hever, Eliyahu Stern

This course explores the nature of identity politics in modern Europe, the Middle East, and America through the idea of the Jew. It introduces students to scholarly texts focused on the nature of identity politics as well as short stories, novels, and films addressing the fluidity of identity as it pertain to Jews in the modern period. W 3:30–5:30

CPLT 690aU/JDST 838aU/RLST 762aU, Politics of Modern Hebrew Literature  Hannan Hever

An overview of the poetics, culture, history, and political dynamics of modern Hebrew literature over the past 250 years. No background in Jewish literature and Jewish culture is required. All readings in English. T 2:30–4:20

CPLT 699a, Heidegger’s Being and TimeMartin Hägglund

A systematic, chapter-by-chapter study of Heidegger’s Being and Time, arguably the most important work of philosophy of the twentieth century. All the major themes of the book are addressed in detail, with a particular emphasis on care, time, death, and the meaning of being. T 1:30–3:20

CPLT 728b/FREN 929b, Chance and Constraints in Literature Morgane Cadieu

The course explores experimental prose in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by focusing on ’pataphysics, surrealism, Oulipo, the Situationists, New Novel, and post-exoticism. Topics include inspiration and creativity; automatic writing and constrained literature; determinism and free will; the aesthetics of randomness; exceptions to the rule; materialism and atomism. Works by Jarry, Duchamp, Breton, Debord, Perec, Queneau, Garréta, Beckett, Calle, Volodine. Theoretical readings by Lucretius, Spinoza, Althusser, Derrida, Serres, Nancy. Conducted in French. TH 1:30–3:20

CPLT 841aU/RUSS 776aU, The Danube River in Literature and Film  Marijeta Bozovic

The Danube is Europe’s second longest river: it flows through or borders ten countries, while its watershed covers four more. From ancient Rome to the present, the Danube has served both as a connector and a contested terrain: from its beginnings in the German Black Forest to the Romanian and Ukrainian shores of the Black Sea, the Danube flows through a region that has emerged black and blue from imperial aspirations of domination, hostilities in the wake of the Cold War, and civil war. The southeastern portion of the river constitutes Europe’s Other—the “Barbaropa” within the continent’s own geographic boundaries—and faces the expansion of another super-political entity in the European Union. This seminar turns to the physical, historical, and metaphoric uses of the great river. At a time of tenuous unification in Europe, “Danube studies” seek to remap the region by focusing on the river’s peoples and their cultural imaginaries and interactions from antiquity to the present, exposing the Danube as a quintessential site of cross-cultural engagement. We study the region’s geography and history, engage theoretical paradigms for understanding cultural differences and their negotiation, draw on film theory and cultural studies, and examine transnational cinema, artwork and literary texts from various Danubian cultural traditions. Through a focus on works of creative and imaginative culture—primarily, on literature and film—the course foregrounds the aesthetic mediation of actual and possible communities, in search of utopian promise even amidst and in the wake of historical atrocities. TTH 2:30–3:45

CPLT 842b, Imperialist Modernism Katerina Clark

Modernism emerged at the height of the imperialist era, and many of its major names were themselves implicated in imperialism, whether as agents of imperialist powers or through family connections. This course explores the role of imperialism in modernist culture and its relationship to exoticism. The approach is multidisciplinary, and the class looks at literary texts, films, and paintings. Works by Camus, Conrad, Leonard and Virginia Woolf, Gauguin, Victor Segalen, Kafka, T.S. Eliot, E.M. Forster, James Joyce, Pierre Loti, and ethnographic films. TH 1:30–3:20

CPLT 870b/HIST 670b/WGSS 860b, Gender Theories and Their Politics  Moira Fradinger

A historical survey of the intellectual tradition that takes for its object the interrogation and theorization of systems of power whereby inequality is associated with gender, sex, and sexuality. These categories are studied in terms of the politics of location that created them: we read from the corpus written in the context of movements such as classical liberal and radical feminism, anarchism, and socialism; the psychoanalytic international community; or institutional academic settings such as the fields of film studies, women’s studies, and gay and lesbian studies. Authors include Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Flora Tristán, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Maria Mies, Heidi Hartmann, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Hortense Spillers, Gayle Rubin, Jacqueline Rose, Juliet Mitchell, Eve K. Sedgwick, Luce Irigaray, Monique Wittig, Teresa de Lauretis, Rosi Braidotti, Luisa Muraro, Adriana Cavarero, Chandra Mohanty, Gloria Anzaldúa, Nira Yuval-Davis, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, and Maxine Molyneux. W 7–9

CPLT 899a/FREN 893a, Realism and Naturalism Maurice Samuels

This seminar interrogates the nineteenth-century French Realist and Naturalist novel in light of various efforts to define its practice. How does critical theory constitute Realism as a category? How does Realism articulate the aims of theory? And how do nineteenth-century Realist and Naturalist novels intersect with other discourses besides the literary? In addition to several works by Balzac, novels to be studied include Stendhal’s Le Rouge et le Noir, Sand’s Indiana, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and Zola’s Nana. Some attention also paid to Realist painting. Reading knowledge of French required. T 1:30–3:20

CPLT 900a, Directed Reading

CPLT 900b, Directed Reading

CPLT 901a, Individual Research

CPLT 901b, Individual Research

CPLT 905bU/FILM 760bU/GMAN 760bU, Intermediality in Film Brigitte Peucker

Film is a hybrid medium, the meeting point of several others. This course focuses on the relationship of film to theater and painting, suggesting that where two media are in evidence, there is usually a third. Topics include space, motion, color, theatricality, tableau vivant, ekphrasis, spectatorship, and new media. Readings feature art historical and film theoretical texts as well as essays pertinent to specific films. Films by Fassbinder, Bergman, Murnau, von Trier, Rohmer, Godard, Kiarostami, and others, concluding with three films by Peter Greenaway. T 3:30–5:20

CPLT 925bU, The Practice of Literary Translation Peter Cole

Intensive readings in the history and theory of translation paired with practice in translating. Case studies from ancient languages (the Bible, Greek and Latin classics), medieval languages (classical Arabic literature), and modern languages (poetic texts). T 1–2:50

CPLT 930b/FILM 624b/ITAL 785b/JDST 843b, The Holocaust in Italian Literature and Film Millicent Marcus

Though Italy was among the Nazi-occupied countries with the highest survival rate of its Jewish population, the Holocaust has continued to haunt the Italian literary and cinematic imagination in ways that warrant close critical scrutiny. The aesthetic and moral problem of how to represent this event in art gains special urgency in the Italian context, where a realist tradition dating back to Dante and Giotto joins forces with a postwar neorealist impulse to create a series of compelling literary treatments (Primo Levi’s above all), as well as cinematic works. In keeping with the Holocaust’s invitation to interdisciplinary study, the course examines the intersection of a number of discourses—historical, literary, cinematic—viewed from a variety of perspectives—feminist, generic, philosophical, theological, and historiographic. Since several of the authors are women, the question of the “voce femminile” and its creation of an alternative, or anti-history, is also raised. W 3:30–5:20, screenings M 7:30

CPLT 949b/AFAM 723b/AMST 645b/WGSS 645b, Caribbean Diasporic Intellectuals  Hazel Carby

This course examines work by writers of Caribbean descent from different regions of the transatlantic world. In response to contemporary interest in issues of globalization, the premise of the course is that in the world maps of these black intellectuals we can see the intertwined and interdependent histories and relations of the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Thinking globally is not a new experience for black peoples, and we need to understand the ways in which what we have come to understand and represent as “Caribbeanness” is a condition of movement. Literature is most frequently taught within the boundaries of a particular nation, but this course focuses on the work of writers who shape the Caribbean identities of their characters as traveling black subjects and refuse to restrain their fiction within the limits of any one national identity. We practice a new and global type of cognitive mapping as we read and explore the meanings of terms like black transnationalism, migrancy, globalization, and empire. Diasporic writing embraces and represents the geopolitical realities of the modern, modernizing, and postmodern worlds in which multiple racialized histories are inscribed on modern bodies. T 2:30–4:20

CPLT 952bU/EALL 586bU, Modern Novel in Japan and Brazil Seth Jacobowitz

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism. W 1:30–3:30

CPLT 962aU, Latin American Intellectual Debates of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries Moira Fradinger

This seminar looks at central cultural debates in the region over two centuries, mainly through the literary and political form of the essay. It explores polemics over the idea of America; debates around the Indian question; issues of cultural hybridity, transculturation, negritude; and the discussion of the region’s modernity and postmodernity. Authors include de Hostos, Alberdi, Bello, Martí, Sarmiento, Rodó, Ortiz, Vasconcelos, Reyes, González Prada, Mariátegui, Mañach, Cabrera, Zea, Roumain, Césaire, Fanon, Damas, Chamoiseau, Rama, Retamar, Benítez Rojo, Ribeiro, Cornejo Polar, García Canclini, Viñas, and Schwarz.

CPLT 989a/AFAM 851a/FREN 943a, Creole Identities and Fictions  Christopher Miller

Focusing on the French and English Caribbean, the course analyzes the quintessential but ambiguous American condition: that of the “Creole.” Encompassing all non-native cultures, this term is inseparable from issues of race and slavery. Readings of historical and literary texts: Moreau de Saint-Méry, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Madame de Staël, Charlotte Brontë (and reinventions of Wuthering Heights by Jean Rhys and Maryse Condé), the Créolistes of Martinique. Attention to Louisiana and to the Haitian Revolution. Reading knowledge of French required. TH 1:30–3:20

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Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

300 George Street, Suite 501, 203.737.6029

http://cbb.yale.edu

M.S., Ph.D.

Directors of Graduate Studies

Mark Gerstein (Bass 432A, 203.432.6105, mark.gerstein@yale.edu)

Hongyu Zhao (300 George St., Suite 503, 203.785.3613, hongyu.zhao@yale.edu)

Professors James Aspnes (Computer Science), Joseph Chang (Statistics), Ronald Coifman (Mathematics; Computer Science), Xing-Wang Deng (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Donald Engelman (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Richard Flavell (Immunobiology), Alison Galvani (Public Health), Mark Gerstein (Biomedical Informatics; Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry; Computer Science), Antonio Giraldez (Genetics), Murat Gunel (Neurosurgery; Genetics), William Jorgensen (Chemistry), Douglas Kankel (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Kenneth Kidd (Genetics; Ecology & Evolutionary Biology), Haifan Lin (Cell Biology; Genetics), Elias Lolis (Pharmacology), Andrew Miranker (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Anna Pyle (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Lynne Regan (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry; Chemistry), Gordon Shepherd (Neuroscience), Abraham Silberschatz (Computer Science), Dieter Söll (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry; Chemistry), Günter Wagner (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology), Heping Zhang (Public Health; Statistics; on leave [Sp]), Hongyu Zhao (Public Health; Genetics), Steven Zucker (Computer Science; Electrical Engineering; Biomedical Engineering)

Associate Professors Kei-Hoi Cheung (Anesthesiology; Computer Science; Genetics), Thierry Emonet (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Steven Kleinstein (Pathology), Yuval Kluger (Pathology), Michael Krauthammer (Pathology), Jun Lu (Genetics), Steven Ma (Public Health), James Noonan (Genetics), Corey O’Hern (Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science; Physics), Valerie Reinke (Genetics), Jeffrey Townsend (Public Health)

Assistant Professors Murat Acar (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Julien Berro (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Damon Clark (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Chris Cotsapas (Neurology), Forrest Crawford (Public Health), Smita Krishnaswamy (Genetics), Anita Wang (Public Health)

Fields of Study

Computational biology and bioinformatics (CB&B) is a rapidly developing multidisciplinary field. The systematic acquisition of data made possible by genomics and proteomics technologies has created a tremendous gap between available data and their biological interpretation. Given the rate of data generation, it is well recognized that this gap will not be closed with direct individual experimentation. Computational and theoretical approaches to understanding biological systems provide an essential vehicle to help close this gap. These activities include computational modeling of biological processes, computational management of large-scale projects, database development and data mining, algorithm development, and high-performance computing, as well as statistical and mathematical analyses.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants are expected (1) to have a strong foundation in the basic sciences, such as biology, chemistry, and mathematics, and (2) to have training in computing/informatics, including significant computer programming experience. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test is required, and the GRE Subject Test in cell and molecular biology, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, or other relevant discipline is recommended. Alternatively, the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) may be substituted for the GRE tests. Applicants for whom English is not their native language are required to submit results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

To enter the Ph.D. program, students apply to an interest-based track within the interdepartmental graduate program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS), http://bbs.yale.edu.

Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology (PEB)

Students applying to one of the interest-based tracks of the Biological and Biomedical Sciences program may simultaneously apply to be part of the PEB program. See the description under Non-Degree-Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes for course requirements, and http://peb.yale.edu for more information about the benefits of this program and application instructions.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

With the help of a faculty advisory committee, each student plans a program that includes courses, seminars, laboratory rotations, and independent reading. Students are expected to gain competence in three core areas: (1) computational biology and bioinformatics, (2) biological sciences, and (3) informatics (including computer science, statistics, and applied mathematics). While the courses taken to satisfy the core areas of competency may vary considerably, all students are required to take the following courses: CB&B 562a, 740a, and 752b. A typical program will include ten courses. Completion of the core curriculum will typically take three to four terms, depending in part on the prior training of the student. With approval of the CB&B director of graduate studies (DGS), students may take one or two undergraduate courses to satisfy areas of minimum expected competency. Students will typically take two to three courses each term and three research rotations (CB&B 711a, 712b, 713b) during the first year. After the first year, students will start working in the laboratory of their Ph.D. thesis supervisor. Students must pass a qualifying examination normally given at the end of the second year or the beginning of the third year. There is no language requirement. Students will serve as teaching assistants in two term courses. In addition to all other requirements, students must successfully complete CB&B 601b, Fundamentals of Research: Responsible Conduct of Research (or another course that covers the material) prior to the end of their first year of study. In their fourth year of study, all students must successfully complete B&BS 503b, RCR Refresher for Senior BBS Students.

M.D./Ph.D. Students

Students pursuing the joint M.D./Ph.D. degrees must satisfy the course requirements listed above for Ph.D. students. With approval of the DGS, some courses taken toward the M.D. degree can be counted toward the ten required courses. Such courses must have a graduate course number, and the student must register for them as graduate courses (in which grades are received). Laboratory rotations are available but not required. One teaching assistantship is required.

Master’s Degree

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) To qualify for the awarding of the M.S. degree a student must (1) complete two years (four terms) of study in the Ph.D. program, with ten required courses taken at Yale, (2) complete the required course work for the Ph.D. program with an average grade of High Pass or higher, (3) successfully complete three research rotations, and (4) meet the Graduate School’s Honors requirement.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program The CB&B terminal master’s program has limited availability and is intended primarily for postdoctoral fellows supported by training grants and for students with sponsored funding, e.g., from industry. The curriculum requirements are the same as in the CB&B Ph.D. program, except that there are no requirements for laboratory research rotations, for serving as a teaching assistant, and for a Ph.D. dissertation. Terminal M.S. students will be expected to complete an M.S. project, including a project report. Completion of the terminal M.S. degree will typically take four terms of full-time study. Applicants should contact the CB&B registrar before submitting an M.S. application.

Courses

CB&B 523a/ENAS 541a/MB&B 523a/PHYS 523a, Biological Physics Corey O’Hern

An introduction to the physics of several important biological phenomena including transport in the cell cytoplasm, protein folding, DNA packaging, and thermodynamics of protein binding and aggregation. The material and approach are positioned at the interface of the physical and biological sciences, and involve significant computation. This course teaches the basics of computer programming necessary for quantitative studies of biological systems. We start with the foundations of programming in MATLAB. During the course, students perform sophisticated data analyses, view and analyze protein structures, and perform Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. No prior programming experience is needed. TTH 1–2:15

CB&B 562b/AMTH 765b/ENAS 561b/INP 562b/MB&B 562bU/MCDB 562bU/PHYS 562b, Dynamical Systems in Biology Damon Clark, Jonathon Howard

This course covers advanced topics in computational biology. How do cells compute, how do they count and tell time, how do they oscillate and generate spatial patterns? Topics include time-dependent dynamics in regulatory, signal-transduction, and neuronal networks; fluctuations, growth, and form; mechanics of cell shape and motion; spatially heterogeneous processes; diffusion. This year, the course spends roughly half its time on mechanical systems at the cellular and tissue level, and half on models of neurons and neural systems in computational neuroscience. Prerequisite: MCDB 561a or equivalent, or a 200-level biology course, or permission of the instructor. TTH 2:30–3:45

CB&B 601b/IBIO 601b, Fundamentals of Research: Responsible Conduct of Research Susan Kaech and faculty

A weekly seminar presented by faculty trainers on topics relating to proper conduct of research. Required of first-year CB&B students, first-year Immunobiology students, and training grant-funded postdocs. Pass/Fail. T 5

CB&B 645b/BIS 692b/STAT 645b, Statistical Methods in Genetics and Bioinformatics Hongyu Zhao

Introduction to problems, algorithms, and data analysis approaches in computational biology and bioinformatics; stochastic modeling and statistical methods applied to problems such as mapping disease-associated genes, analyzing gene expression microarray data, sequence alignment, and SNP analysis. Statistical methods include maximum likelihood, EM, Bayesian inference, Markov chain Monte Carlo, and some methods of classification and clustering; models include hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks, and the coalescent. The limitations of current models, and the future opportunities for model building, are critically addressed. Prerequisite: STAT 538a, 542b, or 661a. Prior knowledge of biology is not required, but some interest in the subject and a willingness to carry out calculations using R is assumed. TH 1–2:50

[CB&B 647b/BIS 645b/GENE 645b, Statistical Methods in Human Genetics]

CB&B 711a, 712b, 713b, Lab Rotations Hongyu Zhao

Three 2.5–3-month research rotations in faculty laboratories are required during the first year of graduate study. These rotations are arranged by each student with individual faculty members.

CB&B 740a, Clinical and Translational Informatics Richard Shiffman, Michael Krauthammer

The course provides an introduction to clinical and translational informatics. Topics include (1) overview of biomedical informatics, (2) design, function, and evaluation of clinical information systems, (3) clinical decision making and practice guidelines, (4) clinical decision support systems, (5) informatics support of clinical research, (6) privacy and confidentiality of clinical data, (7) standards, (8) issues in defining the clinical phenotype, and (9) topics in translational bioinformatics. Permission of the instructor required.

CB&B 745b/AMTH 745b/CPSC 745b, Advanced Topics in Machine Learning and Data Mining Alexander Cloninger, Smita Krishnaswamy, Guy Wolf

An overview of advances in the past decade in machine learning and automatic data-mining approaches for dealing with the broad scope of modern data-analysis challenges, including deep learning, kernel methods, dictionary learning, and bag of words/features. This year, the focus is on a broad scope of biomedical data-analysis tasks, such as single-cell RNA sequencing, single-cell signaling and proteomic analysis, health care assessment, and medical diagnosis and treatment recommendations. The seminar is based on student presentations and discussions of recent prominent publications from leading journals and conferences in the field. Prerequisite: basic concepts in data analysis (e.g., CPSC 545 or 563) or permission of the instructor. W 2:30–5:15

CB&B 750b, Topics in Biomedical Informatics and Data Science Cynthia Brandt, Kei-Hoi Cheung

This course focuses on providing an introduction to common unifying themes that serve as the foundation for different areas of biomedical informatics, including clinical, neuro-, and genome informatics. The course is designed for students with significant computer experience and course work who plan to build databases and computational tools for use in biomedical research. Emphasis is on understanding basic principles underlying informatics approaches to interoperation among biomedical databases and software tools, standardized biomedical vocabularies and ontologies, biomedical natural language processing, modeling of biological systems, high-performance computation in biomedicine, and other related topics. TTH 1–2:15

CB&B 752b/CPSC 752bu/MB&B 752bu/MCDB 752bu, Biomedical Data Science: Mining and Modeling Mark Gerstein

Bioinformatics encompasses the analysis of gene sequences, macromolecular structures, and functional genomics data on a large scale. It represents a major practical application for modern techniques in data mining and simulation. Specific topics to be covered include sequence alignment, large-scale processing, next-generation sequencing data, comparative genomics, phylogenetics, biological database design, geometric analysis of protein structure, molecular-dynamics simulation, biological networks, normalization of microarray data, mining of functional genomics data sets, and machine-learning approaches to data integration. Prerequisites: biochemistry and calculus, or permission of the instructor. MW 1–2:15

Additional courses focused on the biological sciences and on areas of informatics are selected by the student in consultation with CB&B faculty.

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Computer Science

A. K. Watson Hall, 203.432.1246

http://cpsc.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Joan Feigenbaum

Director of Graduate Studies

Vladimir Rokhlin (108 AKW, 203.432.1283, vladimir.rokhlin@yale.edu)

Professors Dana Angluin, James Aspnes, Dirk Bergemann,* Ronald Coifman,* Julie Dorsey, Stanley Eisenstat, Joan Feigenbaum, Michael Fischer, David Gelernter, Mark Gerstein,* Drew McDermott, Vladimir Rokhlin,† Holly Rushmeier, Brian Scassellati, Martin Schultz (Emeritus), Zhong Shao, Avi Silberschatz, Daniel Spielman, Leandros Tassiulas,* Y. Richard Yang, Steven Zucker†

Associate Professors Daniel Abadi, Mahesh Balakrishnan

Assistant Professors Wenjun Hu,* Amin Karbasi,* Smita Krishnaswamy,* Sahand Negahban,* Ruzica Piskac, Mariana Raykova, Frederick Shic,* Jakub Szefer*

Senior Lecturer Stephen Slade

Lecturers Jason Hirschhorn, Kyle Jensen,* Eric Koskinen, Scott Petersen, Patrick Rebeschini [F], Brad Rosen, Andrew Sherman, Xiyin Tang [Sp]

*A secondary appointment with primary affiliation in another department or school. †A joint appointment with another department.

Fields of Study

Algorithms and computational complexity, artificial intelligence, data networking, databases, graphics, machine learning, programming languages, robotics, scientific computing, security and privacy, systems.

Research Facilities

The department operates a high-bandwidth, local-area computer network based mainly on distributed workstations and servers, with connections to worldwide networks. Workstations include Dell dual-processor PCs (running Linux or Windows/XP). Laboratory contains specialized equipment for graphics, vision, and robotics research. Various printers, including color printers, as well as image scanners, are also available. The primary educational facility consists of thirty-seven PC workstations supported by a large Intel PC server. This facility is used for courses and unsponsored research by Computer Science majors and first-year graduate students. Access to computing, through both the workstations and remote login facilities, is available to everyone in the department.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants for admission should have strong preparation in mathematics, engineering, or science. They should be competent in programming but need no computer science beyond that basic level. The GRE General Test and a pertinent Subject Test are required.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

There is no foreign language requirement. To be admitted to candidacy, a student must (1) pass ten courses (including CPSC 690 and CPSC 691) with at least two grades of Honors, the remainder at least High Pass, including three advanced courses in an area of specialization; (2) take six advanced courses in areas of general computer science; (3) successfully complete a research project in CPSC 690, 691, and submit a written report on it to the faculty; (4) pass a qualifying examination in an area of specialization; (5) be accepted as a thesis student by a regular department faculty member; (6) serve as a teaching assistant for two terms at a TF level 10; and (7) submit a written dissertation prospectus, with a tentative title for the dissertation. To satisfy the distribution requirement (requirement 2 above), the student must take one course in programming languages or systems, one programming-intensive course, two theory courses, and two in application areas. In order to gain teaching experience, all graduate students are required to serve as teaching assistants for two terms during their first three years of study. All requirements for admission to candidacy must be completed prior to the end of the third year. In addition to all other requirements, students must successfully complete CPSC 991, Ethical Conduct of Research, prior to the end of their first year of study. This requirement must be met prior to registering for a second year of study.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) To qualify for the M.S., the student must pass eight courses at the 500 level or above from an approved list. An average grade of at least High Pass is required, with at least one grade of Honors.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program Students may also be admitted to a terminal master’s degree program directly. The requirements are the same as for the M.S. en route to the Ph.D. This program is normally completed in one year, but a part-time program may be spread over as many as four years.

A brochure providing additional information about the department, faculty, courses, and facilities is available from the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Computer Science, Yale University, PO Box 208285, New Haven CT 06520-8285; e-mail, cs-admissions@cs.yale.edu.

Courses

CPSC 510aU/LAW 20022, The Law and Technology of Cyber Conflict  Joan Feigenbaum, Oona Hathaway, Scott Shapiro

A cross-disciplinary seminar that addresses both technical and legal aspects of cyber conflict. Traditionally, cyber-security research and policy have proceeded on the (sometimes tacit) assumption that attackers are motivated by profit, protest, challenge, enjoyment, or the desire to evaluate security weaknesses and assist in removing them. Recent events, including the hacks of Sony and the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, illustrate the need for new thinking about the particular issues raised when cyber attacks originate from state or quasi-state actors. The instructors lead an in-depth exploration of cyber conflict from both legal and technical points of view. Total enrollment is expected to be twenty students, ten from Yale Law School and ten from Yale College or the Graduate School. This is the first half of a yearlong course; the second half is CPSC 511b. Students are required to make a yearlong (two-term) commitment. W 9:25–11:15

CPSC 511bU/LAW 21022, The Law and Technology of Cyber Conflict: Practicum  Joan Feigenbaum, Oona Hathaway, Scott Shapiro

A cross-disciplinary “practicum” that addresses both technical and legal aspects of cyber conflict. Traditionally, cyber-security research and policy have proceeded on the (sometimes tacit) assumption that attackers are motivated by profit, protest, challenge, enjoyment, or the desire to evaluate security weaknesses and assist in removing them. Recent events, including the hacks of Sony and the U.S. Office of Personnel Management, illustrate the need for new thinking about the particular issues raised when cyber attacks originate from state or quasi-state actors. The instructors oversee intensive student projects on both legal and technical aspects of cyber conflict. This is the second half of a yearlong course; the first half is CPSC 510a. Students are required to make a yearlong (two-term) commitment. W 9:25–11:15

CPSC 512aU/ECON 562aU, Designing the Digital Economy Glen Weyl

Information technology is transforming how almost every market works: finance has been transformed by algorithmic trading and bitcoin, ridesharing is changing the nature of public transportation, Amazon is revolutionizing logistics, and Airbnb is now the most valuable accommodation provider in the world. This transformation, which has been led by start-ups and newly dominant technology companies, inherently combines technical and economic aspects, as entrepreneurs take advantage of the potential of technology to facilitate exchanges that were previously infeasible. This crash course in the key tools from economics and computer science that are being used to design digital markets exposes students to a range of concrete and topical practical problems in the area. M 2:30–5:30

CPSC 521bU, Compilers and Interpreters Zhong Shao

Compiler organization and implementation: lexical analysis, formal syntax specification, parsing techniques, execution environment, storage management, code generation and optimization, procedure linkage, and address binding. The effect of language-design decisions on compiler construction. TTH 1–2:15

CPSC 522au, Operating Systems Zhong Shao

The design and implementation of operating systems. Topics include synchronization, deadlocks, process management, storage management, file systems, security, protection, and networking. TTH 1–2:15

CPSC 523bU, Principles of Operating Systems Avi Silberschatz

A survey of the underlying principles of modern operating systems. Topics include process management, memory management, storage management, protection and security, distributed systems, and virtual machines. Emphasis on fundamental concepts rather than implementation. TTH 9–10:15

CPSC 524bu, Parallel Programming Techniques Andrew Sherman

Practical introduction to parallel programming, emphasizing techniques and algorithms suitable for scientific and engineering computations. Aspects of processor and machine architecture. Techniques such as multithreading, message passing, and data parallel computing using graphics processing units. Performance measurement, tuning, and debugging of parallel programs. Parallel file systems and I/O. MW 9–10:15

CPSC 526au, Building Decentralized Systems Mahesh Balakrishnan

Challenges and techniques for building decentralized computing systems, in which many networked computers need to cooperate reliably despite failures and without assuming centralized management. Topics include decentralized storage systems, mobile and remote execution, hosting untrusted code, fault tolerance, naming, capabilities, information flow control, distributed shared memory, distributed hash tables, content distribution, and practical uses of cryptography. MW 1–2:15

CPSC 527aU, Object-Oriented Programming Michael Fischer

Object-oriented programming as a means to efficient, reliable, modular, reusable code. Use of classes, derivation, templates, name-hiding, exceptions, polymorphic functions, and other features of C++. MW 4–5:15

[CPSC 528aU, Language-Based Security]

[CPSC 530au, Formal Semantics]

CPSC 531aU, Computer Music: Algorithmic and Heuristic Composition  Scott Petersen

Study of the theoretical and practical fundamentals of computer-generated music. Music and sound representations, acoustics and sound synthesis, scales and tuning systems, algorithmic and heuristic composition, and programming languages for computer music. Theoretical concepts are supplemented with pragmatic issues expressed in a high-level programming language. TTH 11:35–12:50

CPSC 532bU, Computer Music: Sound Representation and Synthesis Scott Petersen

Study of the theoretical and practical fundamentals of computer-generated music, with a focus on low-level sound representation, acoustics and sound synthesis, scales and tuning systems, and programming languages for computer music generation. Theoretical concepts are supplemented with pragmatic issues expressed in a high-level programming language. Prerequisite: ability to read music. WF 11:35–12:50

[CPSC 533bU, Computer Networks]

[CPSC 535bu, Internet-Scale Applications]

[CPSC 536aU/ENAS 960aU, Networked Embedded Systems and Sensor Networks]

CPSC 537au, Introduction to Databases Avi Silberschatz

An introduction to database systems. Data modeling. The relational model and the SQL query language. Relational database design, integrity constraints, functional dependencies, and natural forms. Object-oriented databases. Implementation of databases: file structures, indexing, query processing, transactions, concurrency control, recovery systems, and security. TTH 9–10:15

[CPSC 538bu, Database System Implementation and Architectures]

[CPSC 539bu, Software Engineering]

CPSC 540bu, Numerical Computation Vladimir Rokhlin

Algorithms for numerical problems in the physical, biological, and social sciences: solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations, interpolation and approximation of functions, numerical differentiation and integration, optimization. TTH 2:30–3:45

CPSC 545au, Introduction to Data Mining Guy Wolf

A study of algorithms and systems that allow computers to find patterns and regularities in databases, to perform prediction and forecasting, and to improve their performance generally through interaction with data. TTH 1–2:15

CPSC 551bU, The User Interface David Gelernter

The user interface (UI) in the context of modern design, where tech has been a strong and consistent influence from the Bauhaus and U.S. industrial design of the 1920s and 1930s through the IBM-Eames design project of the 1950s to 1970s. The UI in the context of the windows-menus-mouse desktop, as developed by Alan Kay and Xerox in the 1970s and refined by Apple in the early 1980s. Students develop a detailed design and simple implementation for a UI. TTH 11:35–12:50

CPSC 553aU/GENE 555a, Computational Methods for the Analysis and Modeling of Biological Data Smita Krishnaswamy

This course introduces biology as a systems and data science through open computational problems in biology, the types of high-throughput data that are being produced by modern biological technologies, and computational approaches that may be used to tackle such problems. We cover applications of machine-learning methods in the analysis of high-throughput biological data, especially focusing on genomic and proteomic data, including denoising data; nonlinear dimensionality reduction for visualization and progression analysis; unsupervised clustering; and information theoretic analysis of gene regulatory and signaling networks. Students’ grades are based on programming assignments, a midterm, a paper presentation, and a final project. Prerequisite: GENE 760 or permission of the instructor. TTH 9–10:15

[CPSC 554aU, Software Analysis and Verification]

[CPSC 555au/ECON 563a, Economics and Computation]

[CPSC 557bU, Sensitive Information in a Wired World]

CPSC 558aU, Automated Decision Systems Stephen Slade

People make dozens of decisions every day in their personal and professional lives. What would it mean for you to trust a computer to make those decisions for you? It is likely that many of those decisions are already informed, mediated, or even made by computer systems. Explicit examples include dating sites like match.com or recommendation systems such as Amazon or Netflix. Most Internet ads on sites like Google or Facebook are run by real-time-bidding (RTB) systems that conduct split-second auctions in the hopes of getting your attention. Driverless cars offer the promise of safer highways. Corporations and other enterprises invest in decision support systems to improve the quality of their products and services. This course considers the spectrum of automated decision models and tools, examining their costs and effectiveness. Examples come from a variety of fields including finance, risk management, credit-card fraud, robotics, medicine, and politics. MW 4–5:15

[CPSC 562aU/AMTH 562aU, Graphs and Networks]

[CPSC 565aU, Theory of Distributed Systems]

CPSC 567au, Cryptography and Computer Security Mariana Raykova

A survey of such private and public key cryptographic techniques as DES, RSA, and zero-knowledge proofs, and their application to problems of maintaining privacy and security in computer networks. Focus on technology, with consideration of such societal issues as balancing individual privacy concerns against the needs of law enforcement, vulnerability of societal institutions to electronic attack, export regulations and international competitiveness, and development of secure information systems. TTH 2:30–3:45

CPSC 568bu, Computational Complexity James Aspnes

Introduction to the theory of computational complexity. Basic complexity classes, including polynomial time, nondeterministic polynomial time, probabilistic polynomial time, polynomial space, logarithmic space, and nondeterministic logarithmic space. The roles of reductions, completeness, randomness, and interaction in the formal study of computation. MW 1–2:15

CPSC 569au, Randomized Algorithms James Aspnes

Beginning with an introduction to tools from probability theory including some inequalities like Chernoff bounds, the course covers randomized algorithms from several areas: graph algorithms, algorithms in algebra, approximate counting, probabilistically checkable proofs, and matrix algorithms. MW 11:35–12:50

CPSC 570au, Artificial Intelligence Drew McDermott

Introduction to artificial intelligence research, focusing on reasoning and perception. Topics include knowledge representation, predicate calculus, temporal reasoning, vision, robotics, planning, and learning. MWF 9:25–10:15

[CPSC 571aU, Topics in Artificial Intelligence]

CPSC 572au, Intelligent Robotics Brian Scassellati

Introduction to the construction of intelligent, autonomous systems. Sensory-motor coordination and task-based perception. Implementation techniques for behavior selection and arbitration, including behavior-based design, evolutionary design, dynamical systems, and hybrid deliberative-reactive systems. Situated learning and adaptive behavior. MWF 10:30–11:20

CPSC 573bU, Intelligent Robotics Laboratory Brian Scassellati

Students work in small teams to construct novel research projects using one of a variety of robot architectures. Project topics may include human-robot interaction, adaptive intelligent behavior, active perception, humanoid robotics, and socially assistive robotics. MWF 10:30–11:20

CPSC 575au/ENAS 575au, Computational Vision and Biological Perception  Steven Zucker

An overview of computational vision with a biological emphasis. Suitable as an introduction to biological perception for computer science and engineering students, as well as an introduction to computational vision for mathematics, psychology, and physiology students. MW 2:30–3:45

[CPSC 576bU/AMTH 667b/ENAS 576bU, Advanced Computational Vision]

CPSC 578bU, Computer Graphics Holly Rushmeier

Introduction to the basic concepts of two- and three-dimensional computer graphics. Topics include affine and projective transformations, clipping and windowing, visual perception, scene modeling and animation, algorithms for visible surface determination, reflection models, illumination algorithms, and color theory. MW 9–10:15

[CPSC 579bu, Advanced Topics in Computer Graphics]

CPSC 625b, Advanced Cloud Computing Systems Mahesh Balakrishnan

This course focuses on the fundamental systems research that powers modern cloud computing. We cover the production systems that run within data centers operated by large cloud companies such as Google, Microsoft, and Amazon, as well as the groundbreaking academic research that paved the way for these systems. Technically, we focus on the abstractions and mechanisms required to build online services that are scalable, highly available, durable, and consistent. We cover the entire stack, ranging from single-machine systems to protocols for distributing and replicating data within and across data centers. MW 1–2:15

CPSC 638a, Database Architectures Daniel Abadi

This course focuses on modern database architectures. Although the traditional database architecture (centralized, relational, disk-resident, ACID) has been very successful and continues to be in widespread use, new applications and technologies have led to a wide variety of nontraditional architectures in commercial and open-source projects as well as academia. This course examines why these new architectures have developed and explores aspects of their novel features. W 2:30–5:15

CPSC 639b, Cloud-Scale Software Engineering Eric Koskinen

This course teaches students engineering methodology, design, and implementation skills that are needed for developing software systems that may span a range of scales, from desktop/mobile applications to Cloud-level distributed systems. The course begins by covering software engineering foundations including the software lifecycle, software engineering models such as extreme programming and agile development, design patterns, modularity/reusability, version control, multi-threaded design, sockets, and file 1/0. The latter portion of the course extends these foundations by focusing on software scalability and reliability. To this end, we examine distributed Cloud platforms and cover Cloud-specific concepts such as MapReduce, key-value stores, and log-based platforms. F 1–3:45

[CPSC 662a/AMTH 561a, Spectral Graph Theory]

CPSC 667b, Advanced Cryptography and Security Mariana Raykova

Recent developments in cryptography. Topics include secure multiparty computation, verifiable computation, cryptographic obfuscation, functional encryption, and more. We study the motivation for, applications of, and security requirements for each of these primitives. We then focus on a few different constructions that instantiate each primitive and the formal proofs of security for them. Another point of consideration is the efficiency properties for the constructions, both asymptotically and in concrete practical terms when implementations are available. TTH 2:30–3:45

[CPSC 671a, Advanced Artificial Intelligence]

[CPSC 679b, Computational Issues in 3-D Design and Fabrication]

CPSC 690a or b, Independent Project I

By arrangement with faculty.

CPSC 691a or b, Independent Project II

By arrangement with faculty.

CPSC 692a or b, Independent Project

Individual research for students in the M.S. program. Requires a faculty supervisor and the permission of the director of graduate studies.

[CPSC 721b, Advanced Programming Language Topics]

CPSC 745b/AMTH 745b/CB&B 745b, Advanced Topics in Machine Learning and Data Mining Alexander Cloninger, Smita Krishnaswamy, Guy Wolf

An overview of advances in the past decade in machine learning and automatic data-mining approaches for dealing with the broad scope of modern data-analysis challenges, including deep learning, kernel methods, dictionary learning, and bag of words/features. This year, the focus is on a broad scope of biomedical data-analysis tasks, such as single-cell RNA sequencing, single-cell signaling and proteomic analysis, health care assessment, and medical diagnosis and treatment recommendations. The seminar is based on student presentations and discussions of recent prominent publications from leading journals and conferences in the field. Prerequisite: basic concepts in data analysis (e.g., CPSC 545 or 563) or permission of the instructor. W 2:30–5:15

CPSC 752bu/CB&B 752b/MB&B 752bu/MCDB 752bU, Biomedical Data Science: Mining and Modeling Mark Gerstein

Bioinformatics encompasses the analysis of gene sequences, macromolecular structures, and functional genomics data on a large scale. It represents a major practical application for modern techniques in data mining and simulation. Specific topics to be covered include sequence alignment, large-scale processing, next-generation sequencing data, comparative genomics, phylogenetics, biological database design, geometric analysis of protein structure, molecular-dynamics simulation, biological networks, normalization of microarray data, mining of functional genomics data sets, and machine-learning approaches to data integration. Prerequisites: biochemistry and calculus, or permission of the instructor. MW 1–2:15

By arrangement with faculty.

CPSC 990a, Ethical Conduct of Research for Master’s Students Holly Rushmeier

CPSC 991a/MATH 991a, Ethical Conduct of Research Vladimir Rokhlin

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East Asian Languages and Literatures

308 Hall of Graduate Studies, 203.432.2860

http://eall.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Tina Lu

Director of Graduate Studies

Aaron Gerow

Professors Kang-i Sun Chang, Aaron Gerow, Edward Kamens, Tina Lu, Jing Tsu

Assistant Professors Lucas Bender, Michael Hunter, Seth Jacobowitz

Senior Lecturer Pauline Lin

Senior Lectors Hsiu-hsien Chan, Min Chen, Seungja Choi, Koichi Hiroe, Angela Lee-Smith, Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Fan Liu, Yoshiko Maruyama, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Masahiko Seto, Jianhua Shen, Mari Stever, Wei Su, Haiwen Wang, Yu-lin Wang Saussy, Peisong Xu, Yongtao Zhang, William Zhou

Lectors Aoi Saito, Chuanmei Sun

Fields of Study

Fields for doctoral study are Chinese literature and Japanese literature. (See also the Combined Ph.D. Program in Film and Media Studies.) Although the primary emphasis is on these East Asian subjects, the department welcomes applicants who are seeking to integrate their interests in Chinese or Japanese literature with interdisciplinary studies in such fields as history, history of art, linguistics, religious studies, comparative literature, film and media studies, theater studies, literary theory and criticism, and the social sciences.

Special Admissions Requirements

The department requires entering students in Chinese or Japanese (and the Combined Program in Film and Media Studies) to have completed at least three years of study, or the equivalent, of either Chinese or Japanese. Students applying in Chinese are expected to have completed at least one year of literary Chinese. Students applying in premodern Japanese are expected to have completed at least one year of literary Japanese. This is a doctoral program; no students are admitted for terminal master’s degrees.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

During the first three years of study, students are required to take at least fourteen term courses. Usually students complete twelve term courses in the first and second years, and then take two tutorials or two seminars in the third year. Students concentrating in Chinese or Japanese literature are encouraged to take at least one term course in Western literature or literary theory. By the end of the second year, all students must prove their proficiency in a language other than their primary language of study that is relevant to their course of study and is approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS). By the end of the third year, students specializing in premodern Japanese literature must pass a reading test in literary Chinese. At the end of the second full academic year, the student must take a written examination in the language of his or her specialization, including both its modern and premodern forms.

At the end of each academic year, until a student is admitted to candidacy, a faculty committee will review the student’s progress. For the second-year review, the student must submit a revised seminar research paper, on a topic selected in consultation with the adviser, no later than April 1 of the fourth term. No later than the end of the sixth term the student will take the qualifying oral examination. The exam will cover three fields distinguished by period and/or genre in one or more East Asian national literatures or in other fields closely related to the student’s developing specialization. These fields and accompanying reading lists will be selected in consultation with the examiners and the director of graduate studies in order to allow the student to demonstrate knowledge and command of a range of topics. After having successfully passed the qualifying oral examination, students will be required to submit a dissertation prospectus to the department for approval by October 1 of the seventh term in order to complete the process of admission to candidacy for the Ph.D.

Opportunities to obtain experience in teaching language and literature form an important part of this program. Students in East Asian Languages and Literatures normally teach in their third and fourth years in the Graduate School.

Combined Ph.D. Program

The Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures also offers, in conjunction with the Film and Media Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Literatures and Film and Media Studies. For further details, see Film and Media Studies. Applicants to the combined program must indicate on their application that they are applying both to Film and Media Studies and to East Asian Languages and Literatures. All documentation within the application should include this information.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. The successful completion of all predissertation requirements, including the qualifying examination, will make a student eligible for an M.Phil. degree.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) The successful completion of twelve term courses and languages required in the first two years of study will make a student eligible for an M.A. degree.

Additional program materials are available at the department Web site, http://eall.yale.edu.

Courses

Courses in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages at the elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels are listed in Yale College Programs of Study.

CHNS 570aU, Introduction to Literary Chinese I Michael Hunter

Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style. Prerequisite: CHNS 151b or 153b or equivalent. TTH 9–10:15

CHNS 571bu, Introduction to Literary Chinese II Pauline Lin

Continuation of CHNS 570a. Reading and interpretation of texts in various styles of literary Chinese (wenyan), with attention to basic problems of syntax and literary style. Prerequisite: CHNS 570a or equivalent. MW 11:35–12:50

EALL 503bU, The Tale of GenjiEdward Kamens

A reading of the central work of prose fiction in the Japanese classical tradition in its entirety (in English translation) along with some examples of predecessors, parodies, and adaptations (the latter include Noh plays and twentieth-century short stories). Topics of discussion include narrative form, poetics, gendered authorship and readership, and the processes and premises that have given The Tale of Genji its place in world literature. Attention is also given to the text’s special relationship to visual culture. TTH 9–10:15

EALL 510bU, Man and Nature in Chinese Literature Kang-i Sun Chang

An exploration of man and nature in traditional Chinese literature, with special attention to aesthetic and cultural meanings. Topics include the concept of nature and literature; Neo-Daoist self-cultivation; poetry and Zen (Chan) Buddhism; travel in literature; loss, lament, and self-reflection in song lyrics; nature and the supernatural in classical tales; love and allusions to nature; religious pilgrimage and allegory. All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. TTH 1–2:15

EALL 511aU, Women and Literature in Traditional China Kang-i Sun Chang

This course focuses on major women writers in traditional China, as well as representations of women by male authors. Topics include the power of women’s writing; women and material culture; women in exile; courtesans; Taoist and Buddhist nuns; widow poets; the cross-dressing women; the female body and its metaphors; foot binding and its implications; women’s notion of love and death; the aesthetic of illness; women and revolution; women’s poetry clubs; the function of memory in women’s literature; problems of gender and genre. All readings in translation; no knowledge of Chinese required. Some Chinese texts provided for students who read Chinese. TTH 1–2:15

EALL 555bU, Japanese Modernism Seth Jacobowitz

Japanese literature and art from the 1920s through the 1940s. The avant-garde and mass culture; popular genre fiction; the advent of new media technologies and techniques; effects of Japanese imperialism, militarism, and fascism on cultural production; experimental writers and artists and their resistance to, or complicity with, the state. TTH 11:35–12:50

EALL 581bU/FILM 873bU, Japanese Cinema and Its Others Aaron Gerow

A critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analyzing how Japanese film and media historically represent “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and “monstrous” others like ghosts. TTH 11:35–12:50, screenings W 6:30

EALL 586bU/CPLT 952bU, Modern Novel in Japan and Brazil Seth Jacobowitz

Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Representative texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore their commonalities and divergences. Topics include nineteenth-century realism and naturalism, the rise of mass culture and the avant-garde, and existentialism and postmodernism. W 1:30–3:20

EALL 602bU, Readings in Classical Chinese Prose Kang-i Sun Chang

Close reading of classical prose, critical texts, etc. Topics include literature, politics, textual transmission, reception, and premodern Chinese culture. Because readings vary from year to year, this course may be repeated for credit. Readings in Chinese; discussion in English. W 1:30–3:20

EALL 603aU, Readings in Classical Chinese Poetry Kang-i Sun Chang

A seminar on classical Chinese poetry and poetics. Topics include poetry and cultural history, intertextuality, poetics of lyricism, etc. Because readings vary from year to year, this course may be repeated for credit. Readings in Chinese, discussion in English. W 1:30–3:20

EALL 608bU, Sages of the Ancient World Michael Hunter

Comparative survey of the embodiment and performance of wisdom by ancient sages. Distinctive features and common themes in discourses about wisdom from China, India, the Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Topics include teaching, scheming, and dying. TTH 11:35–12:50

EALL 651aU,bU, Advanced Readings: Modern Chinese Literature Jing Tsu

A rigorous introduction to literary criticism and analysis using texts in the original language. Focus on the contemporary period, drawing from fiction written in Chinese in different parts of the world, from mainland China to Taiwan and from Malaysia to Hong Kong. Texts in both simplified and traditional characters. W 2:30–4:30

EALL 657aU, Meiji Literature and Visual Culture Seth Jacobowitz

Introduction to the literature and visual culture of Meiji Japan (1868–1912), including novels, poetry, calligraphy, woodblock prints, painting, photography, and cinema. The relationship between theories and practices of fine art and literature; changes in word and image relations; transformations from woodblock to movable-type print culture; the invention of photography and early forms of cinematic practice. TTH 11:35–12:50

EALL 720b, Studies in Premodern Japanese Literature Edward Kamens

A research seminar. Students pursue individual topics in pre-seventeenth-century literature and share readings and analyses for discussion on a rotating basis. Prerequisite: proficiency in reading literary Japanese. W 4–6

EALL 759a, Studies in the Man’yo¯shu¯ Edward Kamens

Close study of the anthology and consultation in a variety of commentaries and critiques. Students carry out research projects on topics of their choice. Prerequisite: at least one year or the equivalent of study of literary Japanese. W 4–6

EALL 761a, Topics in Early Chinese Thought Michael Hunter

An examination of certain key problems in the study of early Chinese thought. Topics vary from year to year but in general include intellectual typologies and affiliations, relating received texts and excavated manuscripts, the role of Han editors in shaping pre-Han textual traditions, ruling ideology, and comparisons with other parts of the ancient world. Discussions and papers are in English. Because readings are different each year, this course may be repeated for credit. W 2:30–4:20

EALL 802a, Brazil in the Japanese Imperial Imagination Seth Jacobowitz

This seminar examines Japanese immigrant literature in Brazil in the broader context of Japanese imperialism and expansionism. Primary sources are read in Japanese with secondary scholarship in Japanese and English. T 2:30–4:20

EALL 846a/CPLT 546a, Philology and Sinology Jing Tsu

In this course we examine the history and theoretical foundations of non-Western philology in relation to Western philology and linguistics. We study how they interacted and the development of comparative methods based on notions of sameness and difference. T 1:30–3:20

EALL 871b/EAST 593b/HIST 893b, History of China’s Republican Period  Denise Ho

This reading seminar examines recent English-language scholarship on China’s Republican period (1912–1949) covering themes from state and economy to society and culture. Weekly topics include state institutions and law, nationalism, politics and political movements, the development of cities, media and publication, public health, education, labor, and rural reconstruction. W 3:30–5:20

EALL 872a/FILM 880a, Theories of Popular Culture in Japan: Television  Aaron Gerow

Exploration of postwar theories of popular culture and subculture in Japan, particularly focusing on the intellectual debates over television and new media. M 1:30–3:20, screenings HTBA

EALL 900, Directed Readings

Offered by permission of instructor and DGS to meet special needs not met by regular courses.

EALL 990, Directed Research

Offered as needed with permission of instructor and DGS for student preparation of dissertation prospectus.

JAPN 570au, Introduction to Literary Japanese Edward Kamens

Introduction to the grammar and style of the premodern literary language (bungotai) through a variety of texts. Prerequisite: JAPN 151 or equivalent. MWF 9:25–10:15

JAPN 571bU, Readings in Literary Japanese Angelika Koch

Close analytical reading of a selection of texts from the Nara through Tokugawa period: prose, poetry, and various genres. Introduction of kanbun. Prerequisite: JAPN 570a or equivalent.

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East Asian Studies

The MacMillan Center

320 Luce Hall, 203.432.3426

http://ceas.yale.edu

M.A.

Chair

Jing Tsu (jing.tsu@yale.edu)

Director of Graduate Studies

Peter Perdue [F] (RKZ 242, 617.905.3702, peter.c.perdue@yale.edu)

Valerie Hansen [Sp] (RKZ 342, 203.432.0480, valerie.hansen.yale.edu)

Professors Daniel Botsman (History), Kang-i Sun Chang (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Deborah Davis (Sociology), Fabian Drixler (History), Aaron Gerow (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Film & Media Studies), Valerie Hansen (History; on leave [F]), Edward Kamens (East Asian Languages & Literatures), William Kelly (Anthropology; on leave [Sp]), Tina Lu (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Peter Perdue (History; on leave [Sp]), Frances Rosenbluth (Political Science), Helen Siu (Anthropology), William Summers (Therapeutic Radiology; History of Science & Medicine), Jing Tsu (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Comparative Literature), Anne Underhill (Anthropology), Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan (History of Art)

Associate Professors William Honeychurch (Anthropology; on leave [F]), Andrew Quintman (Religious Studies), Chloë Starr (Divinity)

Assistant Professors Lucas Bender (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Eric Greene (Religious Studies; on leave [Sp]), Denise Ho (History), Michael Hunter (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Seth Jacobowitz (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Youn-mi Kim (History of Art), Eric Weese (Economics)

Senior Lecturers Annping Chin (History), Pauline Lin (East Asian Languages & Literatures)

Lecturers Marc Opper, Cindi Textor, Klaus Yamamoto-Hammering, Soo Ryon Yoon

Senior Lector II Seungja Choi

Senior Lectors Hsiu-hsien Chan, Min Chen, Koichi Hiroe, Angela Lee-Smith, Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Fan Liu, Yoshiko Maruyama, Michiaki Murata, Hiroyo Nishimura, Masahiko Seto, Jianhua Shen, Mari Stever, Wei Su, Haiwen Wang, Yu-lin Wang Saussy, Peisong Xu, Yongtao Zhang, William Zhou

Lectors Aoi Saito, Chuanmei Sun

Fields of Study

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program in East Asian Studies is a multidisciplinary program offering a concentrated course of study designed to provide a broad understanding of the people, history, culture, contemporary society, politics, and economy of China, Japan, or a transnational region within East Asia. This program is designed for students preparing to go on to the doctorate in one of the disciplines of East Asian Studies (e.g., anthropology; economics; history; history of art; language and literature, including comparative literature, film studies, and theater studies; political science; sociology; etc.), as well as for those students seeking a terminal M.A. degree before entering the business world, the media, government service, or a professional school.

Course of Study for the M.A. Degree

The East Asian Studies graduate program is designed to be completed in either a one-year or a two-year track. The two-year track requires the preparation of a master’s thesis and is therefore ideal for students who are keen to pursue focused, independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. It also provides students with an opportunity to pursue additional disciplinary and language training. Students who enter the two-year track with a strong command of one East Asian language will be encouraged to consider beginning a second (or third) language.

In general, students focus their course work on the study of China, Japan, or transnational East Asia. Some students may prefer to focus their course work on one or two disciplines, in addition to language study and courses focused on East Asia. Others may create a highly interdisciplinary program, taking courses in traditional disciplines such as history, literature, political science, art history, or anthropology, as well as in Yale’s professional schools.

Applicants to the East Asian Studies graduate program must indicate on their application whether they are applying to the one-year or the two-year track.

Requirements for the M.A. Degree: One-Year Track

The program of study for completion of the degree on the one-year track consists of eight term courses that must include two terms of language study at or above Yale’s third-year level (unless the language requirement has already been met through previous study or native fluency), plus six other courses selected from the University’s offerings of advanced language study and seminars related to East Asia at the graduate level. For those who meet the language requirement at matriculation, two of the required eight courses may be advanced training in a particular discipline (e.g., economics, history, political theory, statistics, etc.) with no explicit focus on East Asia, but related to the student’s professional goals. The course of study must be approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS).

Special Requirements

Students must earn two Honors grades (“H”) over the course of their two terms at Yale. Honors grades earned in any language course cannot be counted toward satisfying this requirement, except with the permission of the DGS.

Requirements for the M.A. Degree: Two-Year Track

The program of study for completion of the degree on the two-year track consists of sixteen term courses that must include four terms of language study, two terms of which must be at Yale’s fourth-year level (unless the language requirement has already been met through previous study or native fluency), plus twelve other courses selected from the University’s offerings of advanced language study and seminars related to East Asia at the graduate level. Students who have achieved advanced proficiency in one East Asian language are strongly encouraged to pursue study of a second East Asian language, but for those who have met the language requirement in one language at matriculation, two of the required sixteen courses may be advanced training in a particular discipline (e.g., economics, history, political theory, statistics, etc.) with no explicit focus on East Asia, but related to the student’s professional goals. The course of study must be approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS).

Special Requirements

Students must earn four Honors grades (“H”) over the course of their four terms at Yale. Honors grades earned in any language course cannot be counted toward satisfying this requirement, except with the permission of the DGS. A master’s thesis is also required.

Master’s Thesis

A master’s thesis is required of students enrolled in the two-year degree program. The master’s thesis is based on research in a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member with specialized competence in the chosen topic. M.A. students must register for EAST 900, which may count toward the sixteen required courses. EAST 900 may not be taken for audit. Students may register for an additional independent study to prepare topics and begin research. The master’s thesis must be prepared according to CEAS guidelines and is due in two copies in the student’s second year on an early-April date as specified by CEAS.

Joint-Degree Programs

The Council on East Asian Studies (CEAS) collaborates with three of Yale’s professional schools—Forestry & Environmental Studies, Law, and Public Health—and has developed joint-degree programs that offer a strong connection between two demanding courses of study while also fulfilling the requirements of each separate school. Only students enrolled in the two-year track of the East Asian Studies M.A. degree program are eligible for a joint degree.

Each joint program leads to the simultaneous award of two graduate professional degrees: the M.A. in East Asian Studies from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and an M.F., M.E.M., M.E.Sc., M.F.S., J.D., or M.P.H. from the relevant professional school. Students can earn the two degrees simultaneously in less time than if they were pursued sequentially.

With the exception of the joint M.A./J.D. program, which requires four years, completion of all requirements takes three years. Typically candidates spend the first year in one program and the second year in the partner program. During the third and final year of study, students register in one program each term. Joint-degree students are guided in this process by a committee composed of the DGS and a faculty member of the relevant professional school.

Candidates must submit formal applications to both the Graduate School and the relevant professional school and be admitted separately to each school, i.e., each school makes its decision independently. It is highly recommended that students apply to and enter a joint-degree program from the outset, although it is possible to apply to the second program once matriculated at Yale.

Program materials are available upon request to the Council on East Asian Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; e-mail, eastasian.studies@yale.edu; Web site, http://ceas.yale.edu. Applications are available online at http://gsas.yale.edu/admission-graduate-school; e-mail, graduate.admissions@yale.edu.

Courses

Please consult the course information available online at http://ceas.yale.edu/academics/courses and http://students.yale.edu/oci for a complete list of East Asian-related courses offered at Yale University.

EAST 593b/EALL 871b/HIST 893b, History of China’s Republican Period  Denise Ho

This reading seminar examines recent English-language scholarship on China’s Republican period (1912–1949) covering themes from state and economy to society and culture. Weekly topics include state institutions and law, nationalism, politics and political movements, the development of cities, media and publication, public health, education, labor, and rural reconstruction. W 3:30–5:20

EAST 900b, Master’s Thesis

Directed reading and research on a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member (by arrangement) with expertise or specialized competence in the chosen field. Readings and research are done in preparation for the required master’s thesis.

EAST 910a, Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty and with approval of the DGS.



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Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Osborn Memorial Laboratories, 203.432.3837

http://eeb.yale.edu

M.S., Ph.D.

Chair

Paul Turner

Director of Graduate Studies

David Vasseur

Professors Richard Bribiescas (Anthropology), Nicholas Christakis (Sociology), Michael Donoghue, Alison Galvani (Public Health), Vivian Irish (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), David Post, Jeffrey Powell, Richard Prum, Eric Sargis (Anthropology), Oswald Schmitz (Forestry & Environmental Studies), David Skelly (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Stephen Stearns, Paul Turner, J. Rimas Vaisnys (Electrical Engineering), Günter Wagner

Associate Professors Walter Jetz, Thomas Near, James Noonan (Genetics), Jeffrey Townsend (Public Health), David Vasseur

Assistant Professors Liza Comita (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Forrest Crawford (Public Health), Alvaro Sanchez, Carla Staver (on leave)

Senior Lecturer Marta Martínez Wells

Lecturers Adalgisa Caccone, Linda Puth

Fields of Study

The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (E&EB) offers training programs in organismal biology, ecology, and evolutionary biology including molecular evolution, phylogeny, molecular population genetics, developmental evolution, and evolutionary theory.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants should have had training in one of the following fields: biology, mathematics, chemistry, physics, statistics, and/or geology. Candidates are selected, regardless of their major, based on overall preparation for a career in research in ecology and evolutionary biology. Some, planning for careers in applied fields, may have prepared with courses in public policy, economics, and agriculture.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Each entering student, in consultation with the director of graduate studies (DGS), develops a specific program of courses, seminars, laboratory research, and independent reading tailored to the student’s interests, background, and goals. There are normally no foreign language requirements. All first-year students carry out two research rotations. Students have the option of a rotation over their first summer. Students must participate in (1) E&EB 500, Advanced Topics in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; (2) E&EB 545b, a course on the responsible conduct of research; (3) weekly E&EB seminars; and (4) symposia of faculty and graduate student research. In addition, during their first two years of study, graduate students must enroll in a minimum of three additional graduate-level courses (numbered 500 and above); a grade of H must be earned in two of these. Teaching experience is regarded as an integral part of the graduate training program. All students are required to teach three courses, normally at a level 20, typically during their first two years of study.

By the middle of the fourth term of study, each student organizes a formal pre­prospectus consultative meeting with his/her advisory committee to discuss the planned dissertation research. Before the beginning of the fifth term, students present and defend their planned dissertation research at a prospectus meeting, at which the department determines the viability and appropriateness of the student’s Ph.D. proposal. A successful prospectus meeting and completion of course requirements results in admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. The remaining requirements include completion, presentation, and successful defense of the dissertation, and submission of copies of the dissertation to the Graduate School and to the Center for Science and Social Science Information.

In cases where the dissertation committee decides that preliminary field work during the summer after the fourth term is necessary prior to the prospectus, the prospectus meeting can be delayed by one term. A request for a delay must come from the dissertation committee adviser and must be approved by the DGS. In these exceptional cases admission to candidacy may not be required for registration for the third year of graduate study.

Honors Requirement

Students must meet the Graduate School’s requirement of Honors in two courses by the end of the fourth term of study. The E&EB department also requires an average grade of at least High Pass in course work during the first two years of study.

Master’s Degree

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students must pass ten graduate-level courses. At least four courses must be taken for a grade, and students must earn Honors in two courses and maintain an overall average of High Pass. Required courses are:

  • E&EB 500a, Advanced Topics in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  • E&EB 501b, Advanced Topics in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  • E&EB 545, Responsible Conduct of Research
  • E&EB 901, Research Rotation I; and E&EB 902, Research Rotation II

A minimum of five additional graduate-level courses (four taken for a grade) are required.

Additional information on the department, faculty, courses, and facilities is available from Laura Rotter, Office of the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, PO Box 208106, New Haven CT 06520-8106; e-mail, laura.rotter@yale.edu; tel., 203.432.3837; fax, 203.432.2374; Web site, http://eeb.yale.edu.

Courses

E&EB 500a and 501b, Advanced Topics in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology  David Vasseur

Topics to be announced. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. M 2:30–4:30

E&EB 510au/STAT 501au, Introduction to Statistics: Life Sciences Walter Jetz

Statistical and probabilistic analysis of biological problems, presented with a unified foundation in basic statistical theory. Problems are drawn from genetics, ecology, epidemiology, and bioinformatics. TTH 1–2:15

E&EB 515aU, Conservation Biology Jeffrey Powell, Linda Puth

An introduction to ecological and evolutionary principles underpinning efforts to conserve Earth’s biodiversity. Efforts to halt the rapid increase in disappearance of both plants and animals. Discussion of sociological and economic issues. MW 10:30–11:20, 1 HTBA

E&EB 520au, General Ecology David Post, David Vasseur

A broad consideration of the theory and practice of ecology, including the ecology of individuals, population dynamics and regulation, community structure, ecosystem function, and ecological interactions on broad spatial and temporal scales. Topics such as climate change, fisheries management, and infectious disease are placed in an ecological context. MWF 10:30–11:20

E&EB 523Lbu, Laboratory for Evolution and Functional Traits  Marta Martínez Wells

Experimental approaches to organismal and population biology, including study of the diversity of life. TWTH 1:30–4:30

E&EB 525bu, Evolutionary Biology Alvaro Sanchez

An overview of evolutionary biology as the discipline uniting all of the life sciences. Evolution explains the origin of life and Earth’s biodiversity, and how organisms acquire adaptations that improve survival and reproduction. This course uses reading and discussion of scientific papers to emphasize that evolutionary biology is a dynamic science, involving active research to better understand the mysteries of life. We discuss principles of population genetics, paleontology, and systematics; application of evolutionary thinking in disciplines such as developmental biology, ecology, microbiology, molecular biology, and human medicine. TTH 10:30–11:20, 1 HTBA

[E&EB 526Lbu, Laboratory for Evolutionary Biology]

E&EB 528bU, Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease Paul Turner

Overview of the ecology and evolution of pathogens (bacteria, viruses, protozoa) and their impact on host populations. Topics include theoretical concepts, ecological and evolutionary dynamics, molecular biology, and epidemiology of ancient and emerging diseases. TTH 10:30–11:20, 1 HTBA

E&EB 530aU, Field Ecology Linda Puth

A field-based introduction to ecological research. Experimental and descriptive approaches, comparative analysis, and modeling are explored through field and small-group projects. TTH 1–5

E&EB 535aU, Evolution and Medicine Stephen Stearns

Introduction to the ways in which evolutionary science informs medical research and clinical practice. Diseases of civilization and their relation to humans’ evolutionary past; the evolution of human defense mechanisms; antibiotic resistance and virulence in pathogens; cancer as an evolutionary process. Students view course lectures online; class time focuses on discussion of lecture topics and research papers. T 7–8:50

E&EB 545b, Responsible Conduct of Research David Post

This five-week discussion seminar considers issues related to the responsible conduct of research. Topics addressed include research misconduct, plagiarism, data acquisition and management, mentoring and collaboration, authorship and peer review, the use of animals and humans in scientific research, sexual harassment, diversity, and balancing professional and personal life. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. M 2:30–4:30

E&EB 546aU, Plant Diversity and Evolution Michael Donoghue

Introduction to the major plant groups and their evolutionary relationships, with an emphasis on the diversification and global importance of flowering plants. MW 1–2:15

E&EB 547aU, Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Evolution Michael Donoghue

Hands-on experience with the plant groups examined in the accompanying lectures. Local field trips. T 1–4

E&EB 550au, Biology of Terrestrial Arthropods Marta Martínez Wells

Evolutionary history and diversity of terrestrial arthropods (body plan, phylogenetic relations, fossil record); physiology and functional morphology (water relations, thermo-regulation, energetics of flying and singing); reproduction (biology of reproduction, life cycles, metamorphosis, parental care); behavior (migration, communication, mating systems, evolution of sociality); ecology (parasitism, mutualism, predator-prey interactions, competition, plant-insect interactions). TTH 11:35–12:50

E&EB 551Lau, Laboratory for Biology of Terrestrial Arthropods  Marta Martínez Wells

Comparative anatomy, dissections, identification, and classifications of terrestrial arthropods; specimen collection; field trips. W 1:30–4:30

[E&EB 564aU, Ichthyology]

[E&EB 565LaU, Laboratory for Ichthyology]

E&EB 575bU, Biological Oceanography Mary Beth Decker

Exploration of a range of coastal and pelagic ecosystems. Relationships between biological systems and the physical processes that control the movements of water and productivity of marine systems. Anthropogenic impacts on oceans, such as the effects of fishing and climate change. Includes three Friday field trips. TTH 11:35–12:50

E&EB 610a, Evolutionary Functional Genomics, Cell Types, and Homology  Günter Wagner

Functional genomics has opened the opportunity to assess the activity state of all genes in the genomes in a largely scalable way. Many cell types, tissues, and characters can readily be assessed across many species, leading to a new field of evolutionary or comparative functional genomics. At the same time this new field of data analysis can be used to address many deep issues in organismic evolution, like the evolution of cell types, the homology among cell types, etc. In this seminar we review the current state of published literature as it pertains to the evolutionary analysis of transcriptomes and epigenetic marks and their bearing on issues of cell and tissue evolution and homology.

[E&EB 620bU, Advanced Ecology]

[E&EB 636b/SOCY 636b, Biosocial Science]

E&EB 650b, Biology of Insect Disease Vectors Brian Weiss

Insects transmit pathogens that cause many emerging and reemerging human and agriculture-related diseases. Many of these diseases, which are referred to as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), have a dramatically negative impact on human health in the developing world. Furthermore, they cause indirect devastation by significantly reducing agricultural productivity and nutrient availability, exacerbating poverty and deepening disparities. This course introduces students to the biological interactions that occur between major groups of important disease vectors and the pathogens they transmit. Lectures cover current research trends that relate to the ecology and physiology of insect vectors. Course content focuses on how these aspects of vector biology relate to the development and implementation of innovative and effective disease control strategies. Prerequisites: full year of college/university-level biology, or permission of the instructor. W 3–4:20, TH 3–3:50

[E&EB 660bU, Conservation Genetics]

E&EB 672bU, Ornithology Richard Prum

An overview of avian biology and evolution, including the structure, function, behavior, and diversity of birds. The evolutionary origin of birds, avian phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, neurobiology, breeding systems, and biogeography. MWF 9:25–10:15

E&EB 673LbU, Laboratory for Ornithology Richard Prum

Laboratory and field studies of avian morphology, diversity, phylogeny, classification, identification, and behavior. T 1:30–4:30

E&EB 680bU, Life History Evolution Stephen Stearns

Life history evolution studies how the phenotypic traits directly involved in reproductive success are shaped by evolution to solve ecological problems. The intimate interplay between evolution and ecology. TTH 11:35–12:50

[E&EB 713b, Spatial and Environmental Data Analysis]

[E&EB 720b, Ecology of Global Change]

[E&EB 740b, Long-term Temporal Dynamics of Ecological Systems]

E&EB 810a, Evolving Dynamical Systems J. Rimas Vaisnys

An introduction to the ways evolving biological systems can be described, modeled, and analyzed by using a dynamical systems approach. Concrete models are explored with respect to field or laboratory observations. Extensive use of the software package Mathematica, but prior experience with the program is not required. TTH 9:25–10:15

E&EB 842bU/ANTH 835bU, Primate Diversity and Evolution Eric Sargis

The diversity and evolutionary history of living and extinct primates. Focus on major controversies in primate systematics and evolution, including the origins and relationships of several groups. Consideration of both morphological and molecular studies. Morphological diversity and adaptations explored through museum specimens and fossil casts. W 1:30–3:20

E&EB 900a–b, First-Year Introduction to Research and Rotations David Vasseur

E&EB 901, Research Rotation I David Vasseur

E&EB 902, Research Rotation II David Vasseur

[E&EB 930a, Seminar in Systematics]

E&EB 950a or b, Second-Year Research

By arrangement with faculty.

E&EB 960bU/EMD 695b, Studies in Evolutionary Medicine I Stephen Stearns

The first term of a two-term course that begins in January. Students learn the major principles of evolutionary biology and apply them to issues in medical research and practice by presenting and discussing original papers from the current research literature. Such issues include lactose and alcohol tolerance; the hygiene hypothesis and autoimmune disease; human genetic variation in drug response and pathogen resistance; spontaneous abortions, immune genes, and mate choice; parental conflicts over reproductive investment mediated by genetic imprinting; life history trade-offs and the evolution of aging; the evolution of virulence and drug resistance in pathogens; the evolutionary genetics of humans and their pathogens; the ecology and evolution of disease; the evolutionary origin of diseases; and the emergence of new diseases. Students develop a research proposal based on one of their own questions in the spring term, spend the summer on a research project related to their research proposal, and write a paper based on the results of their research in the fall term. Credit and grades are awarded for each term. Only students who have engaged in summer research projects may enroll in the fall term. Admission is by competitive application only. Forms are available on the E&EB department Web site. TTH 4–5:15

E&EB 961aU/EMD 695a, Studies in Evolutionary Medicine II Paul Turner

Continuation of E&EB 960b. Students learn the major principles of evolutionary biology and apply them to issues in medical research and practice by presenting and discussing original papers from the current research literature. Such issues include lactose and alcohol tolerance; the hygiene hypothesis and autoimmune disease; human genetic variation in drug response and pathogen resistance; spontaneous abortions, immune genes, and mate choice; parental conflicts over reproductive investment mediated by genetic imprinting; life history trade-offs and the evolution of aging; the evolution of virulence and drug resistance in pathogens; the evolutionary genetics of humans and their pathogens; the ecology and evolution of disease; the evolutionary origin of diseases; and the emergence of new diseases. Students develop a research proposal based on one of their own questions in the spring term, spend the summer on a research project related to their research proposal, and write a paper based on the results of their research in the fall term. Credit and grades are awarded for each term. Only students who have engaged in summer research projects may enroll in the fall term. Prerequisite: E&EB 960b or permission of the instructor. TTH 4–5:15

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Economics

28 Hillhouse Avenue, 203.432.3575

http://economics.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Dirk Bergemann (28 Hillhouse, 203.432.3571)

Director of Graduate Studies

Truman Bewley (30 Hillhouse, Rm. 30, 203.432.3719, truman.bewley@yale.edu)

Professors Joseph Altonji, Donald Andrews, Dirk Bergemann, Steven Berry, Truman Bewley, Xiaohong Chen, Zhiwu Chen (Management), Ray Fair, Howard Forman (Public Health), John Geanakoplos, Pinelope Goldberg, Timothy Guinnane, Philip Haile, Johannes Hörner, Jonathan Ingersoll (Management), Gerald Jaynes, Dean Karlan, Yuichi Kitamura, Alvin Klevorick, Samuel Kortum, Naomi Lamoreaux (on leave [F]), Giovanni Maggi, Costas Meghir, Robert Mendelsohn (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Giuseppe Moscarini, William Nordhaus, Peter Phillips, Benjamin Polak, Mark Rosenzweig, Larry Samuelson, Robert Shiller, Anthony Smith, Aleh Tsyvinski, Christopher Udry, Edward Vytlacil, Ebonya Washington

Associate Professors Konstantinos Arkolakis, Eduardo Faingold, Amanda Kowalski, Nancy Qian

Assistant Professors Timothy Armstrong, José-Antonio Espín-Sánchez, Zhen Huo, Mitsuru Igami, Daniel Keniston, Ilse Lindenlaub, Michael Peters, Nicholas Ryan, Joseph Shapiro, Eric Weese

Fields of Study

Fields include economic theory, including microeconomics, macroeconomics, mathematical economics; econometrics; economic history; labor economics; industrial organization; financial economics; behavioral finance; public economics; public finance; international trade; international finance; economic development; behavioral economics; law and economics.

Special Admissions Requirements

Please see http://economics.yale.edu/graduate/application-info.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

The following requirements must be satisfied in addition to those prescribed by the Graduate School.

Prior to registration for the second year. (a) Students must have taken for credit and passed at least six economics graduate courses. (b) Students must pass written comprehensive examinations in micro- and macroeconomics. These examinations, which are given in May and late August of each year, must be taken in the spring term of the first year. Each exam will be graded separately, and in the event of failure, students will retake only the part of the exam they did not pass. Students may take the comprehensive examination no more than twice.

Prior to registration for the third year. (a) Students must have taken at least fourteen term courses in Economics and have received a grade of at least Pass in each of them. With the permission of the director of graduate studies, courses in related fields and independent reading courses can be used to fulfill this requirement. Workshops may not be used to satisfy it. All workshops are graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. (b) Students must have received an average of at least High Pass in the courses they have taken. The admissibility of courses for this requirement is the same as for the fourteen-course requirement mentioned above. Grades within the Economics department include pluses and minuses. A failure counts as a zero, a P– as a 1, a P as a 2, a P+ as a 3, and so on up to a 9 for H+. The arithmetic average of these numbers must be at least 4.5.

Admission to candidacy. Students must be admitted to candidacy prior to registration for the fourth year of study. Students are recommended to the Graduate School for admission to candidacy by the Department of Economics after having completed department requirements listed above, the Graduate School’s prospectus requirement, and the following additional requirements: (a) Students must have completed two one-term prospectus workshops. In order for workshops to count toward the prospectus requirement, students must make a presentation in each workshop and present original work in one of them. If students can find no workshop whatsoever in their areas of interest, they may substitute independent study guided by a faculty member, provided the independent study leads to a dissertation prospectus that is accepted. (b) Students must receive a grade of High Pass– or better in ECON 551b (Econometrics II) or 552b (Econometrics III). More advanced courses may be substituted for these with special permission of the director of graduate studies. (c) Students must receive a grade of Satisfactory on an applied econometrics paper, which is evaluated by the faculty adviser of the paper and another faculty member. (d) Students must complete with a grade of at least High Pass– a term of economic history, drawn from a list of courses approved by the director of graduate studies and economic history instructors. (e) Students must pass an oral examination in two fields. At least one field must have substantial empirical and institutional content. The choice of fields must be approved by the director of graduate studies. In the event of failure, students may take the oral examination no more than twice.

Submitting the dissertation. A student’s dissertation research is guided by a committee of two Graduate School faculty members, at least one of whom must be a member of the Economics department. One of the committee members is designated as chair. When a first draft of the dissertation is completed, the director of graduate studies appoints a third reader.

Programs in Law and Economics

The Economics department participates in the J.D./M.A. and J.D./Ph.D. programs, which are described under Policies and Regulations.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. The M.Phil. degree is awarded to students in the Ph.D. program upon completion of fourteen term courses, with at least two grades of Honors. In addition, students must satisfy the qualifying requirements in economic theory, econometrics, economic history, and two special fields, as well as the oral examination.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) The M.A. degree is awarded upon completion of eight term courses with an average grade of High Pass. Students must complete at least two of the three two-course sequences in microeconomics, macroeconomics, or econometrics for first-year graduate students.

The M.A. in International and Development Economics is described under International and Development Economics.

Program materials are available on our Web site: http://economics.yale.edu.

Courses

ECON 500a, General Economic Theory: Microeconomics Truman Bewley, Mira Frick

Introduction to optimization methods and partial equilibrium. Theories of utility and consumer behavior production and firm behavior. Introduction to uncertainty and the economics of information, and to noncompetitive market structures.

ECON 501b, General Economic Theory: Microeconomics Eduardo Faingold, Ryota Iijima

General equilibrium and welfare economics. Allocation involving time. Public sector economics. Uncertainty and the economics of information. Introduction to social choice.

[ECON 502a, Mathematics for Economists]

ECON 510a, General Economic Theory: Macroeconomics Anthony Smith, Zhen Huo

Analysis of short-run determination of aggregate employment, income, prices, and interest rates in closed and open economies. Stabilization policies.

ECON 511b, General Economic Theory: Macroeconomics Giuseppe Moscarini

Theories of saving, investment, portfolio choice, and financial markets. Longer-run developments; economic growth, capital accumulation, income distribution.

ECON 520a, Advanced Microeconomic Theory I Mira Frick, Dov Somet

A formal introduction to game theory and information economics. Alternative non­cooperative solution concepts are studied and applied to problems in oligopoly, bargaining, auctions, strategic social choice, and repeated games.

ECON 521b, Advanced Microeconomic Theory II Juuso Välimäki, Ryota Iijima

Contracts and the economics of organization. Topics may include dynamic contracts (both explicit and implicit), career concerns, hierarchies, Bayesian mechanism design, renegotiation, and corporate control.

ECON 522a and 523b, Microeconomic Theory Lunch

A forum for advanced students to critically examine recent papers in the literature and present their own work.

[ECON 524a, Behavioral Applied Theory]

ECON 525a, Advanced Macroeconomics I Zhen Huo, Nicolas Werquin

Heterogeneous agent economics, investment, scrapping and firing, nonquadratic adjustment costs, financial constraints, financial intermediation, psychology of decision making under risk, optimal risk management, financial markets, consumption behavior, monetary policy, term structure of interest rates.

ECON 526b, Advanced Macroeconomics II Ilse Lindenlaub

Macroeconomic equilibrium in the presence of uninsurable labor income risk. Implications for savings, asset prices, unemployment.

[ECON 527a/LAW 20083/MGT 565a, Behavioral and Institutional Economics]

ECON 530a, General Equilibrium Foundations of Finance and Macroeconomics John Geanakoplos

The course gives a careful mathematical description of the general equilibrium underpinnings of the main models of finance and the new macroeconomics of collateral and default. Part I is a review of Walrasian general equilibrium, including the mathematical techniques of fixed points and genericity, both taught from an elementary point of view. Part II covers general equilibrium with incomplete markets (GEI). Part III focuses on the special case of the capital asset pricing model (CAPM), including extensions to multi-commodity CAPM and multifactor CAPM. Part IV focuses on the Modigliani-Miller theorem and generic constrained inefficiency. Part V describes collateral equilibrium and the leverage cycle. Part VI covers default and punishment and adverse selection and moral hazard in general equilibrium. Part VII describes monetary equilibrium. W 4–7

[ECON 531b, Mathematical Economics II]

[ECON 535a and b, Prospectus Workshop in Mathematical Economics]

ECON 537a and 538b, Microeconomic Theory Workshop

Presentations by research scholars and participating students.

ECON 540a and 541b, Student Workshop in Macroeconomics

A course that gives third- and fourth-year students doing research in macroeconomics an opportunity to prepare their prospectuses and to present their dissertation work. Each student is required to make at least two presentations per term. For third-year students and beyond, at least one of the presentations in the first term should be a mock job talk.

ECON 542a and 543b, Macroeconomics Workshop 

A forum for presentation and discussion of state-of-the-art research in macroeconomics. Presentations by research scholars and participating students of papers in closed economy and open economy macroeconomics and monetary economics.

ECON 545a, Microeconomics Michael Boozer

A survey of the main features of current economic analysis and of the application of the theory to a number of important economic questions, covering microeconomics and demand theory, the theory of the firm, and market structures. For IDE students.

ECON 546b, Growth and Macroeconomics David Love

This course presents a basic framework to understand macroeconomic behavior and the effects of macroeconomic policies. Topics include consumption and investment, labor market, short-run income determinations, unemployment, inflation, growth, and the effects of monetary and fiscal policies. The emphasis is on the relation between the underlying assumptions of macroeconomic framework and policy implications derived from it.

ECON 550a, Econometrics I Donald Andrews

Probability: concepts and axiomatic development. Data: tools of descriptive statistics and data reduction. Random variables and probability distributions; univariate distributions (continuous and discrete); multivariate distributions; functions of random variables and transformations; the notion of statistical inference; sampling concepts and distributions; asymptotic theory; point and interval estimation; hypothesis testing.

ECON 551b, Econometrics II Timothy Armstrong

Provides a basic knowledge of econometric theory, and an ability to carry out empirical work in economics. Topics include linear regression and extensions, including regression diagnostics, generalized least squares, statistical inference, dynamic models, instrumental variables and maximum likelihood procedures, simultaneous equations, nonlinear and qualitative-choice models. Examples from cross-section, time series, and panel data applications.

ECON 552b, Econometrics III Xiaohong Chen, Yuichi Kitamura

The treatment of the subject is rigorous, attentive to modern developments, and proceeds to research level in several areas. Linear models from core curriculum. Topics include linear estimation theory, multiple and multivariate regressions, Kruskal’s theorem and its applications, classical statistical testing by likelihood ratio, Lagrange multiplier and Wald procedures, bootstrap methods, specification tests, Stein-like estimation, instrumental variables, and an introduction to inferential methods in simultaneous stochastic equations.

ECON 553a, Econometrics IV: Time Series Econometrics Peter Phillips

A sequel to ECON 552, the course proceeds to research level in time series econometrics. Topics include an introduction to ergodic theory, Wold decomposition, spectral theory, martingales, martingale convergence theory, mixing processes, strong laws, and central limit theory for weak dependent sequences with applications to econometric models and model determination.

ECON 554b, Econometrics V Xiaohong Chen, Timothy Armstrong

The first half of this course is about nonlinear parametric models. Specification, estimation, and testing within the Likelihood and Generalized Method of Moments frameworks. First-order asymptotics for both smooth and non-smooth objective functions. Efficiency and robustness. A short account of high-order asymptotics for smooth problems. The second part is on nonparametric and semiparametric methods. Nonparametric estimation by kernels, series, splines, and other methods. Bias reduction and bandwidth selection. The course of dimensionality and additive models. Specification and estimation of semiparametric models. U-statistics and asymptotic properties. Efficiency and adaptation.

[ECON 555a, Applied Econometrics II: Microeconometrics]

ECON 556a, Topics in Empirical Economics and Public Policy Amanda Kowalski, Philip Haile, Edward Vytlacil

Methods and approaches to empirical economic analysis are reviewed, illustrated, and discussed with reference to specific empirical studies. The emphasis is on learning to use methods and on understanding how specific empirical questions determine the empirical approach to be used. We review a broad range of approaches including program evaluation methods and structural modeling, including estimation approaches, computational issues, and problems with inference. Open only to doctoral students in the Department of Economics. Exceptionally, doctoral students from other departments may take the course for credit if a faculty member, normally from their department, can supervise and grade their term paper.

[ECON 557a, Econometrics VI]

ECON 558a, Econometrics Michael Boozer

Application of statistical analysis to economic data. Basic probability theory, linear regression, specification and estimation of economic models, time series analysis, and forecasting. The computer is used. For IDE students.

ECON 559b, Development Econometrics (IDE) Michael Boozer

ECON 561bU, Computational Methods in Economics Anthony Smith

How to use computational methods to solve and analyze dynamic economic models. The first part of the course covers standard tools of numerical analysis that are useful in economics (minimization of functions, root-finding, interpolation, approximation of functions, integration, simulation). The second shows how to use these tools to study dynamic economic problems in macroeconomics, finance, labor economics, public finance, and industrial organization, paying special attention to methods for solving stochastic dynamic programming problems and for computing equilibria in economic models with heterogeneous actors.

ECON 562aU/CPSC 512aU, Designing the Digital Economy Glen Weyl

Information technology is transforming how almost every market works: finance has been transformed by algorithmic trading and bitcoin, ridesharing is changing the nature of public transportation, Amazon is revolutionizing logistics, and Airbnb is now the most valuable accommodation provider in the world. This transformation, which has been led by start-ups and newly dominant technology companies, inherently combines technical and economic aspects, as entrepreneurs take advantage of the potential of technology to facilitate exchanges that were previously infeasible. This crash course in the key tools from economics and computer science that are being used to design digital markets exposes students to a range of concrete and topical practical problems in the area. M 2:30–5:30

[ECON 563a/CPSC 555aU, Economics and Computation] 

ECON 567a and 568b, Econometrics Workshop

A forum for state-of-the-art research in econometrics. Its primary purpose is to disseminate the results and the technical machinery of ongoing research in theoretical and applied fields.

ECON 570a and 571b, Prospectus Workshop in Econometrics

A course for third- and fourth-year students doing research in econometrics to prepare their prospectus and present dissertation work.

ECON 580a, General Economic History: Western Europe Timothy Guinnane

A survey of some major events and issues in the economic development of Western Europe during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, stressing the causes, nature, and consequences of the industrial revolution in Britain and on the Continent, and the implications of the historical record for modern conceptions of economic growth. Prerequisites: simultaneous enrollment in or successful completion of ECON 500a and ECON 510a; permission of the instructor.

ECON 581b, American Economic History José-Antonio Espín-Sánchez, Naomi Lamoreaux

This course examines both the long-term factors (such as industrialization and the development of markets) and the epochal events (such as the Revolution, Civil War, and Great Depression) that have shaped the development of the American economy. The objectives of this course are to familiarize students with the major topics and debates in American economic history. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in or successful completion of ECON 501b and ECON 510a.

[ECON 582a, General Economic History: Latin America]

[ECON 583a, Topics in Economic History]

[ECON 585b, Readings in Economic History] 

ECON 588a and 589b, Economic History Workshop Timothy Guinnane

A forum for discussion and criticism of research in progress. Presenters include graduate students, Yale faculty, and visitors. Topics concerned with long-run trends in economic organization are suitable for the seminar. Special emphasis given to the use of statistics and of economic theory in historical research.

ECON 591aU, Economics of Poverty Alleviation Dean Karlan

Measures that succeed and fail—and why—in the fight against poverty in developing countries. Fundamentals of behavioral economics and their application to policy and program design. When and how to use experimental methods to evaluate ideas and programs. Interventions and policies that apply to households, small firms, and communities, with particular attention to microfinance, health, and education.

ECON 600a, Industrial Organization I Philip Haile, Mitsuru Igami

Begins by locating the study of industrial organization within the broader research traditions of economics and related social sciences. Alternative theories of decision making, of organizational behavior, and of market evolution are sketched and contrasted with standard neoclassical theories. Detailed examination of the determinants and consequences of industrial market structure.

ECON 601b, Industrial Organization II Steven Berry

Examination of alternative modes of public control of economic sectors with primary emphasis on antitrust and public utility regulation in the U.S. economy. Public policy issues in sectors of major detailed governmental involvement.

ECON 606a and 607b, Prospectus Workshop in Industrial Organization

For third-year students in microeconomics, intended to guide students in the early stages of theoretical and empirical dissertation research. Emphasis on regular writing assignments and oral presentations.

ECON 608a and 609b, Industrial Organization Seminar

For advanced graduate students in applied microeconomics, serving as a forum for presentation and discussion of work in progress of students, Yale faculty members, and invited speakers.

ECON 630a, Labor Economics Costas Meghir

Topics include static and dynamic approaches to demand, human capital and wage determination, wage income inequality, unemployment and minimum wages, matching and job turnover, immigration and international trade, unions, implicit contract theory, and efficiency wage hypothesis.

ECON 631b, Labor Economics Joseph Altonji, Ilse Lindenlaub

Topics include static and dynamic models of labor supply, human capital wage function estimation, firm-specific training, compensating wage differentials, discrimination, household production, bargaining models of household behavior, intergenerational transfers, and mobility.

ECON 638a and 639b, Labor and Population Workshop

A forum primarily for graduate students to present their research plans and findings. Discussions encompass empirical microeconomic research relating to both high- and low-income countries.

ECON 640a/b, Prospectus Workshop in Labor Economics and Public Finance

Workshop for students doing research in labor economics and public finance.

ECON 670a/MGMT 740a, Financial Economics I Jonathan Ingersoll

Current issues in theoretical financial economics are addressed through the study of current papers. Focuses on the development of the problem-solving skills essential for research in this area.

ECON 671b/MGMT 741b, Financial Economics II Alan Moreira

Continuation of ECON 670a/MGMT 740a.

ECON 672b/MGMT 745b, Behavioral Finance Nicholas Barberis

Much of modern financial economics works with models in which agents are rational, in that they maximize expected utility and use Bayes’s law to update their beliefs. Behavioral finance is a large and active field that studies models in which some agents are less than fully rational. Such models have two building blocks: limits to arbitrage, which make it difficult for rational traders to undo the dislocations caused by less rational traders; and psychology, which catalogues the kinds of deviations from full rationality we might expect to see. We discuss these two topics and then consider a number of applications: asset pricing (the aggregate stock market and the cross-section of average returns); individual trading behavior; and corporate finance (security issuance, corporate investment, and mergers).

ECON 674b/MGMT 746b, Financial Crises Gary Gorton, Andrew Metrick

An elective doctoral course covering theoretical and empirical research on financial crises. The first half of the course focuses on general models of financial crises and historical episodes from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The second half of the course focuses on the recent financial crisis. Prerequisites: MGMT 740a and 741b (doctoral students in Economics may substitute the core microeconomics sequence), and permission of the instructor.

ECON 680a, Public Finance I Amanda Kowalski

Major topics in public finance including externalities, public goods, benefit/cost analysis, fiscal federalism, social insurance, retirement savings, poverty and inequality, taxation, and others. Applications are provided to crime, education, environment and energy, health and health insurance, housing, and other markets and domains. The course covers a variety of applied methods including sufficient statistics, randomized control trials, hedonic models, regression discontinuity, discrete choice, spatial equilibrium, dynamic growth models, differences-in-differences, integrated assessment models, applied general equilibrium, event studies, firm production functions, learning models, general method of moments, and propensity-score reweighting estimators.

ECON 681b, Public Finance II Abigail Adams, Jesse Gregory

This course covers social insurance, health care, charitable giving, externalities, crime, and an introduction to political economy. Students are expected to participate actively in class discussion and to write and present a short empirical research paper.

[ECON 702b, International Economics]

[ECON 709a, International Economics and Open Economy Macroeconomics]

ECON 720a, International Trade I Pinelope Goldberg, Giovanni Maggi

This course covers the theory of international trade, policy, and institutions. Discussion of Classical, Neo-classical, and more recent imperfect-Competition-Scale-Economies-based static models of trade. The course presents dynamic extensions of some of the models that explore the relations among trade, innovation, and growth. The analytics of trade policy issues, such as gains from trade, tariffs and quotas, customs unions and free trade areas, and the political economy of trade policy making, are discussed.

ECON 721b, International Trade II Samuel Kortum

The course covers empirical topics in international trade with particular emphasis on current research areas. Topics include tests of international trade theories; studies of the relationship between international trade, labor markets, and income distribution; recent trade liberalization episodes in developing countries; empirical assessment of various trade policies, such as VERs and Anti-Dumping; productivity (and its relation to international trade liberalization); and exchange rates, market integration, and international trade. Methodologically, the course draws heavily on empirical models used in the fields of industrial organization and to a lesser degree labor economics; taking these courses is thus recommended though not required.

[ECON 724b, International Finance]

ECON 730a, Economic Development I Christopher Udry, Mark Rosenzweig

Development theory at both aggregate and sectoral levels; analysis of growth, employment, poverty, and distribution of income in both closed and open developing economy contexts.

ECON 731b, Economic Development II Nicholas Ryan, Nancy Qian

Analysis of development experiences since World War II. Planning and policy making across countries and time. Models of development, growth, foreign trade, and investment. Trade, capital, and technology flows and increasing interdependence. The political economy of policy making and policy reform.

ECON 732b, Advanced Economic Development Daniel Keniston

Examines the models of classical and modern economists to explain the transition of developing economies into modern economic growth, as well as their relevance to income distribution, poverty alleviation, and human development.

[ECON 735bu, Economics of Agriculture]

[ECON 736au, Economics of Technology]

ECON 737bu, Economics of Natural Resources Robert Mendelsohn

Linking of abstract economic concepts to concrete policy and management decisions. Application of theoretical tools of economics to global warming, pollution control, fisheries, forestry, recreation, and mining.

ECON 749a and 750b, Trade and Development Workshop

A forum for graduate students and faculty with an interest in the economic problems of developing countries. Faculty, students, and a limited number of outside speakers discuss research in progress.

ECON 756a/b, Prospectus Workshop in Development

Workshop for students doing research in development to present and discuss work.

[ECON 776bu, Economics of Population]

ECON 788a/PLSC 575a, Political Competition John Roemer

Political competition in democracies is party competition. We develop, from the formal viewpoint, theories of party competition in democracies. The familiar “median voter theorem” of A. Downs is the simplest example of such a theory, but it is inadequate in several ways. We develop a theory in which parties (1) compete over several issues, not just one issue, as in Downs; (2) are uncertain about how citizens will respond to platforms; and (3) represent interest groups in the population. Applications, particularly to the theory of income distribution and taxation, are studied.

ECON 790b, Political Economy I Ebonya Washington

An overview of the field of empirical political economy. While students are expected to familiarize themselves with the most prevalent models in the field, the emphasis in this course is on the applied work. Students attain a working knowledge of the literature, learn to critically evaluate the literature, and most importantly develop the skills to come up with interesting, workable, and theoretically grounded research questions that will push that literature forward.

ECON 794b, Political Economy II Giovanni Maggi

Theoretical and empirical research in international trade policy. The course focuses on welfare analysis of trade policies under perfect completion and under oligopoly; the political economy of trade policy; and the economics and political economy of inter­national trade agreements. Prerequisites: ECON 500a and 501b.

[ECON 795a, Topics in Political Economy]

ECON 899a or b, Individual Reading and Research

By arrangement with faculty.

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Electrical Engineering

Dunham Laboratory, 203.432.4252

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Leandros Tassiulas

Director of Graduate Studies

Hongxing Tang (hong.tang@yale.edu)

Professors Richard Barker (Emeritus), James Duncan, Jung Han, Roman Kuc, Tso-Ping Ma, A. Stephen Morse, Kumpati Narendra, Mark Reed, Peter Schultheiss (Emeritus), Lawrence Staib, Hemant Tagare, Hongxing Tang, Leandros Tassiulas, J. Rimas Vaisnys, Y. Richard Yang

Associate Professors Richard Lethin (Adjunct), Sekhar Tatikonda

Assistant Professors Wenjun Hu, Amin Karbasi, Jakub Szefer, Fengnian Xia

Fields of Study

Fields include biomedical sensory systems, communications and signal processing, neural networks, control systems, wireless networks, sensor networks, microelectro­mechanical and nanomechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), nanoelectronic science and technology, optoelectronic materials and devices, semiconductor materials and devices, computer engineering, computer architecture, hardware security, and VLSI design and testing.

For admissions and degree requirements, and for course listings, see Engineering & Applied Science.

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Engineering & Applied Science

Dunham Laboratory, 203.432.4252

http://seas.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Dean

T. Kyle Vanderlick

Deputy Dean

Vincent Wilczynski

Programs of study are offered in the areas of applied mechanics, computer science, mechanical engineering and materials science, chemical and environmental engineering, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineering. All programs are under the School of Engineering & Applied Science.

Biomedical Engineering

Chair

Jay Humphrey

Director of Graduate Studies

Richard Carson (richard.carson@yale.edu)

Professors Richard Carson, Nicholas Christakis, James Duncan, Karen Hirschi, Jay Humphrey, Fahmeed Hyder, Themis Kyriakides (Pathology), Andre Levchenko, Laura Niklason, Douglas Rothman, W. Mark Saltzman, Martin Schwartz, Fred Sigworth, Brian Smith, Lawrence Staib, Hemant Tagare, Paul Van Tassel, Steven Zucker (Computer Science)

Associate Professors Joerg Bewersdorf (Cell Biology), Robin de Graaf, Tarek Fahmy, Rong Fan, Anjelica Gonzalez, Evan Morris, Xenophon Papademetris, Corey Wilson

Assistant Professors Stuart Campbell, Michael Choma, Chi Liu, Kathryn Miller-Jensen, Michael Murrell, Steven Tommasini, Jiangbing Zhou

Fields of Study

Fields include biological devices, biological signals and sensors, biomaterials, biomechanics, biophotonics, computer vision, digital image analysis and processing, drug delivery, modeling in mechanobiology, MRI, MRS, PET and modeling, the physics of image formation (MRI, optics, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, and X-ray), physiology and human factors engineering, systems biology, systems medicine, and tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Chemical & Environmental Engineering

Chair

Jaehong Kim

Director of Graduate Studies

Eric Altman

Professors Eric Altman, Michelle Bell, Gaboury Benoit, Ruth Blake, Menachem Elimelech, Thomas Graedel, Gary Haller (Emeritus), Edward Kaplan, Michael Loewenberg, Robert McGraw (Adjunct), Andrew Miranker, Lisa Pfefferle, Joseph Pignatello (Adjunct), Daniel Rosner (Emeritus), James Saiers, W. Mark Saltzman, Udo Schwarz, T. Kyle Vanderlick, Paul Van Tassel, Kurt Zilm

Associate Professors Tarek Fahmy, Jaehong Kim, Chinedum Osuji, Jordan Peccia, André Taylor, Corey Wilson, Julie Zimmerman

Assistant Professors Drew Gentner, Shu Hu, Desirée Plata, Mingjiang Zhong

Fields of Study

Fields include nanomaterials, soft matter, interfacial phenomena, biomolecular engineering, energy, water, and sustainability.

Computer Science

Chair

Joan Feigenbaum

Director of Graduate Studies

Vladimir Rokhlin (108 AKW, 203.432.1283, vladimir.rokhlin@yale.edu)

Professors Dana Angluin, James Aspnes, Dirk Bergemann,* Ronald Coifman,* Julie Dorsey, Stanley Eisenstat, Joan Feigenbaum, Michael Fischer, David Gelernter, Mark Gerstein,* Drew McDermott, Vladimir Rokhlin,† Holly Rushmeier, Brian Scassellati, Martin Schultz (Emeritus), Zhong Shao, Avi Silberschatz, Daniel Spielman, Leandros Tassiulas,* Y. Richard Yang, Steven Zucker†

Associate Professors Daniel Abadi, Mahesh Balakrishnan

Assistant Professors Wenjun Hu,* Amin Karbasi,* Smita Krishnaswamy,* Sahand Negahban,* Ruzica Piskac, Mariana Raykova, Frederick Shic,* Jakub Szefer*

Senior Lecturer Stephen Slade

Lecturers Jason Hirschhorn, Kyle Jensen,* Eric Koskinen, Scott Petersen, Patrick Rebeschini [F], Brad Rosen, Andrew Sherman, Xiyin Tang [Sp]

*A secondary appointment with primary affiliation in another department or school. †A joint appointment with another department.
Fields of Study

Algorithms and computational complexity, artificial intelligence, data networking, databases, graphics, machine learning, programming languages, robotics, scientific computing, security and privacy, systems.

Electrical Engineering

Chair

Leandros Tassiulas

Director of Graduate Studies

Hongxing Tang (hong.tang@yale.edu)

Professors Richard Barker (Emeritus), James Duncan, Jung Han, Roman Kuc, Tso-Ping Ma, A. Stephen Morse, Kumpati Narendra, Mark Reed, Peter Schultheiss (Emeritus), Lawrence Staib, Hemant Tagare, Hongxing Tang, Leandros Tassiulas, J. Rimas Vaisnys, Y. Richard Yang

Associate Professors Richard Lethin (Adjunct), Sekhar Tatikonda

Assistant Professors Wenjun Hu, Amin Karbasi, Jakub Szefer, Fengnian Xia

Fields of Study

Fields include biomedical sensory systems, communications and signal processing, neural networks, control systems, wireless networks, sensor networks, microelectro­mechanical and nanomechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), nanoelectronic science and technology, optoelectronic materials and devices, semiconductor materials and devices, computer engineering, computer architecture, hardware security, and VLSI design and testing.

Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science

Chair

Udo Schwarz

Director of Graduate Studies

Jan Schroers (jan.schroers@yale.edu)

Professors Charles Ahn, Ira Bernstein (Emeritus), Juan Fernández de la Mora, Alessandro Gomez, Sohrab Ismail-Beigi, Shun-Ichiro Karato, Marshall Long, Brian Scassellati, Jan Schroers, Udo Schwarz, Mitchell Smooke

Associate Professors Aaron Dollar, Corey O’Hern

Assistant Professors Eric Brown, Judy Cha, Madhusudhan Venkadesan

Lecturers Beth Anne Bennett, Kailasnath Purushothaman, Joseph Zinter

Fields of Study

Fluids and thermal sciences Dynamics and stability of drops and bubbles; dynamics of thin liquid films; macroscopic and particle-scale dynamics of emulsions, foams, and colloidal suspensions; electrospray theory and characterization; electrical propulsion applications; combustion and flames; computational methods for fluid dynamics and reacting flows; turbulence; particle tracking in fluid mechanics; laser diagnostics of reacting and nonreacting flows; and magnetohydrodynamics.

Soft matter/complex fluids Jamming and slow dynamics in gels, glasses, and granular materials; mechanical properties of soft and biological materials; and structure and dynamics of macromolecules. Several faculty in Mechanical Engineering are also affiliated with the Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology (http://peb.yale.edu).

Materials science Studies of thin films; nanoscale effects on electronic properties of two-dimensional layered materials; amorphous metals and nanomaterials including nanocomposites, characterization of crystallization and other phase transformations; nanoimprinting; atomic-scale investigations of surface interactions and properties; classical and quantum nanomechanics; nanotribology; nanostructured energy applications; combinatorial materials science; and in situ transmission electron and scanning probe microscopy.

Robotics/mechatronics Machine and mechanism design; dynamics and control; robotic grasping and manipulation; human-machine interface; rehabilitation robotics; haptics; electromechanical energy conversion; biomechanics of human movement; and human-powered vehicles.

Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology (PEB)

Students applying to the Ph.D. program in Biomedical Engineering, Chemical & Environmental Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science may also apply to be part of the PEB program. See the description under Non-Degree-Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes for course requirements, and http://peb.yale.edu for more information about the benefits of this program and application instructions.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

The online publication Qualification Procedure for the Ph.D. Degree in Engineering & Applied Science describes in detail all requirements in Biomedical Engineering, Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science. The student is strongly encouraged to read it carefully; key requirements are briefly summarized below. See Computer Science’s departmental entry in this bulletin for special requirements for the Ph.D. in Computer Science.

The student plans his/her course of study in consultation with faculty advisers (the student’s advisory committee). A minimum of ten term courses is required, to be completed in the first two years. Well-prepared students may petition for course waivers based on courses taken in a previous graduate degree program. Similarly, students may place out of certain ENAS courses via an examination prepared by the course instructor. Placing out of the course will not reduce the total number of required courses. Core courses, as identified by each department/program, should be taken in the first year unless otherwise noted by the department. With the permission of the departmental director of graduate studies (DGS), students may substitute more advanced courses that cover the same topics. No more than two courses can be Special Investigations, and at least two must be outside the area of the dissertation. All students must complete a one-term course, Responsible Conduct of Research, in the first year of study.

Each term, the faculty review the overall performance of the student and report their findings to the DGS who, in consultation with the associate dean, determines whether the student may continue toward the Ph.D. degree. By the end of the second term, it is expected that a faculty member has agreed to accept the student as a research assistant. By December 5 of the third year, an area examination must be passed and a written prospectus submitted before dissertation research is begun. These events result in the student’s admission to candidacy. Subsequently, the student will report orally each year to the full advisory committee on progress. When the research is nearing completion, but before the thesis writing has commenced, the full advisory committee will advise the student on the thesis plan. A final oral presentation of the dissertation research is required to be given during term time. There is no foreign language requirement.

Teaching experience is regarded as an integral part of the graduate training program at Yale University, and all Engineering graduate students are required to serve as a Teaching Fellow for one term, typically during year two. Teaching duties normally involve assisting in laboratories or discussion sections and grading papers and are not expected to require more than ten hours per week. Students are not permitted to teach during the first year of study.

If a student was admitted to the program having earned a score of less than 26 on the Speaking Section of the Internet-based TOEFL, the student will be required to take an English as a Second Language (ESL) course each semester at Yale until the Graduate School’s Oral English Proficiency standard has been met. This must be achieved by the end of the third year in order for the student to remain in good standing.

Core Course Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Biomedical Engineering Physiological Systems (ENAS 550), Physical and Chemical Basis of Bioimaging and Biosensing (ENAS 510). One of these courses may be taken in the second year. In addition, there is a math requirement that must be met by taking Biomedical Data Analysis (ENAS 549), Mathematical Methods I (ENAS 500), or Advanced Engineering Mathematics (ENAS 505) in the first year.

Chemical & Environmental Engineering (Chemical track) Mathematical Methods I (ENAS 500), Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics (ENAS 521), Energy, Mass, and Momentum Processes (ENAS 603), Chemical Reaction Engineering (ENAS 602).

Chemical & Environmental Engineering (Environmental track) Water Chemistry (ENAS 638), Biological Processes in Environmental Engineering (ENAS 641), Environmental Physicochemical Processes (ENAS 642). In addition, there is a math requirement that must be met by taking one of the following courses in the first year: Mathematical Methods I (ENAS 500), Applied Spatial Statistics (F&ES 781), Multivariate Statistical Analysis in the Environmental Sciences (F&ES 758), Introductory Data Analysis (STAT 530), or Multivariate Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences (STAT 660).

Computer Science See Computer Science’s departmental entry in this bulletin.

Electrical Engineering (Computer Engineering track) Computer Architectures for Cognitive Processing and Machine Learning (ENAS 907), Computer Organization and Architecture (ENAS 967).

Electrical Engineering (Microelectronics track) Two of the following four courses: Photonics and Optical Electronics (ENAS 511), Heterojunction Devices (ENAS 718), Solid State Physics I (ENAS 850), Semiconductor Silicon Devices and Technology (ENAS 986).

Electrical Engineering (System and Signals track) Linear Systems (ENAS 902), Stochastic Processes (ENAS 502).

Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science Students must demonstrate competence in one of four areas: Fluid and Thermal Sciences, Soft Matter/Complex Fluids, Materials Science, or Robotics/Mechatronics. As a minimum requirement, students must take at least one of the following courses in the first year of study: Intelligent Robotics (CPSC 573), Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics (ENAS 521), Biological Physics (ENAS 541), Polymer Physics (ENAS 606), Synthesis of Nanomaterials (ENAS 615), Statistical Physics II (PHYS 628), Theoretical Fluid Dynamics (ENAS 704), Fundamentals of Combustion (ENAS 708), Solidification and Phase Transformations (ENAS 752), Introduction to Robot Analysis (ENAS 777), Forces on the Nanoscale (ENAS 787), Soft Condensed Matter Physics (ENAS 848), Solid State Physics I (ENAS 850), Solid State Physics II (ENAS 851), Linear Systems (ENAS 902)—if not used to satisfy the math requirement—and Systems and Control (ENAS 936). In addition, there is a math requirement that must be met by taking Mathematical Methods I (ENAS 500), Mathematical Methods of Physics (PHYS 506), or Linear Systems (ENAS 902), depending on the research area.

Honors Requirement

Students must meet the Honors requirement in at least two term courses (excluding Special Investigations) by the end of the second term of full-time study. An extension of one term may be granted at the discretion of the DGS.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) To qualify for the M.S., the student must pass eight term courses; no more than two may be Special Investigations. An average grade of at least High Pass is required, with at least one grade of Honors.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program Students may also be admitted directly to a terminal master’s degree program. The requirements are the same as for the M.S. en route to the Ph.D., although there are no core course requirements for students in this program. This program is normally completed in one year, but a part-time program may be spread over as many as four years. Some courses are available in the evening, to suit the needs of students from local industry.

Program materials are available upon request to the Office of Graduate Studies, School of Engineering & Applied Science, Yale University, PO Box 208267, New Haven CT 06520-8267; e-mail, engineering@yale.edu; Web site, http://seas.yale.edu.

Courses

The list of courses may be slightly modified by the time term begins. Please check the Web site http://students.yale.edu/oci for the most updated course listing.

ENAS 500a/APHY 500a, Mathematical Methods I J. Rimas Vaisnys

A beginning, graduate-level introduction to ordinary and partial differential equations, vector analysis, linear algebra, and complex functions. Laplace transform, series expansion, Fourier transform, and matrix methods are given particular attention. Applications to problems frequently encountered in engineering practice are stressed throughout. TTH 9–10:15

[ENAS 501b, Mathematical Methods II]

ENAS 502bu, Stochastic Processes Amin Karbasi

A study of stochastic processes and estimation, including fundamentals of detection and estimation. Vector space representation of random variables, Bayesian and Neyman-Pearson hypothesis testing, Bayesian and nonrandom parameter estimation, minimum-variance unbiased estimators, and the Cramer-Rao bound. Stochastic processes. Linear prediction and Kalman filtering. Poisson counting process and renewal processes, Markov chains, branching processes, birth-death processes, and semi-Markov processes. Applications from communications, networking, and stochastic control. MW 1–2:15

ENAS 503a/AMTH 605a/STAT 667a, Probabilistic Networks, Algorithms, and Applications Sekhar Tatikonda

This course examines probabilistic and computational methods for the statistical modeling of complex data. The emphasis is on the unifying framework provided by graphical models, a formalism that merges aspects of graph theory and probability theory. Graphical models: Markov random fields, Bayesian networks, and factor graphs. Algorithms: filtering, smoothing, belief-propagation, sum-product, and junction tree. Variational techniques: mean-field and convex relaxations. Markov processes on graphs: MCMC, factored HMMs, and Glauber dynamics. Some statistical physics techniques: cavity and replica methods. Applications to error-correcting codes, computer vision, bio-informatics, and combinatorial optimization.

[ENAS 505a, Advanced Engineering Mathematics]

[ENAS 506b, Ethics and Professional Development for Biomedical Engineers and Scientists]

ENAS 508b, Responsible Conduct of Research

Required of first-year students. Presentation and discussion of topics and best practices relevant to responsible conduct of research including academic fraud and misconduct, conflict of interest and conflict of commitment, data acquisition and human subjects, use and care of animals, publication practices and responsible authorship, mentor/trainee responsibilities and peer review, and collaborative science.

ENAS 509au, Electronic Materials: Fundamentals and Applications Jung Han

Survey and review of fundamental issues associated with modern microelectronic and optoelectronic materials. Topics include band theory, electronic transport, surface kinetics, diffusion, materials defects, elasticity in thin films, epitaxy, and Si integrated circuits. TTH 9–10:15

ENAS 510au, Physical and Chemical Basis of Bioimaging and Biosensing  Douglas Rothman, Fahmeed Hyder, Fred Sigworth, Richard Carson

Basic principles and technologies for imaging and sensing the chemical, electrical, and structural properties of living tissues and biological macromolecules. Topics include magnetic resonance spectroscopy, MRI, positron emission tomography, and molecular imaging with MRI and fluorescent probes. TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 511au, Physics and Devices of Optical Communication Hongxing Tang

A survey of the enabling components and devices that constitute modern optical communication systems. Focus on the physics and principles of each functional unit, its current technological status, design issues relevant to overall performance, and future directions. Permission of the instructor required. MW 2:30–3:45

ENAS 513au, Introduction to Analysis

Foundations of real analysis, including metric spaces and point set topology, infinite series, and function spaces. TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 514bu, Real Analysis Philip Gressman

The Lebesgue integral, Fourier series, applications to differential equations. TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 517b/MB&B 517b3/MCDB 517b3/PHYS 517b3, Methods and Logic in Interdisciplinary Research Lynne Regan, Julien Berro, Enrique De La Cruz, Eric Dufresne, Thierry Emonet, Paul Forscher, Jonathon Howard, Megan King, Simon Mochrie, Corey O’Hern, Thomas Pollard, Yongli Zhang, and staff

This half-term PEB class is intended to introduce students to integrated approaches to research. Each week, the first of two sessions is student-led, while the second session is led by faculty with complementary expertise and discusses papers that use different approaches to the same topic (for example, physical and biological or experiment and theory). Counts as 0.5 credit toward graduate course requirements. MW 5–7

ENAS 518a/MB&B 635au, Quantitative Approaches in Biophysics and Biochemistry  Yong Xiong, Julien Berro, Nikhil Malvankar

The course offers an introduction to quantitative methods relevant to analysis and interpretation of biophysical and biochemical data. Topics covered include statistical testing, data presentation, and error analysis; introduction to dynamical systems; analysis of large datasets; and Fourier analysis in signal/image processing and macromolecular structural studies. The course also includes an introduction to basic programming skills and data analysis using MATLAB. Real data from research groups in MB&B are used for practice. Prerequisites: MATH 120 and MB&B 600a or equivalents, or permission of the instructors. TTH 9–10:15

ENAS 521b, Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics Chinedum Osuji

A unified approach to bulk-phase equilibrium thermodynamics, bulk-phase irreversible thermodynamics, and interfacial thermodynamics in the framework of classical thermodynamics, and an introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Both the activity coefficient and the equations of state are used in the description of bulk phases. Emphasis on classical thermodynamics of multicomponents, including concepts of stability and criticality, curvature effect, and gravity effect. The choice of Gibbs free energy function covers applications to a broad range of problems in chemical, environmental, biomedical, and petroleum engineering. The introduction includes theory of Gibbs canonical ensembles and the partition functions, fluctuations; Boltzmann statistics; Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Application to ideal monatomic and diatomic gases is covered.

[ENAS 525au, Optimization I]

ENAS 530bU, Optimization Techniques Sekhar Tatikonda

Fundamental theory and algorithms of optimization, emphasizing convex optimization. The geometry of convex sets, basic convex analysis, the principle of optimality, duality. Numerical algorithms: steepest descent, Newton’s method, interior point methods, dynamic programming, unimodal search. Applications from engineering and the sciences. MW 2:30–3:45

ENAS 534aU, Biomaterials Anjelica Gonzalez

Introduction to materials, classes of materials from atomic structure to physical properties. Major classes of materials: metals, ceramics and glasses, and polymers, addressing their specific characteristics, properties, and biological applications. Throughout the presentation of the synthesis, characterization, and properties of the classes of materials, a connection is made to the selection of materials for use in specific biological applications by matching the material’s properties to those necessary for success in the application. Case studies address the successes and failures of particular materials from each of the classes in biological applications. MW 11:35–12:50

ENAS 535bU/PATH 630b, Biomaterial-Tissue Interactions Themis Kyriakides

The course addresses the interactions between tissues and biomaterials, with an emphasis on the importance of molecular- and cellular-level events in dictating the performance and longevity of clinically relevant devices. In addition, specific areas such as biomaterials for tissue engineering and the importance of stem/progenitor cells, and biomaterial-mediated gene and drug delivery are addressed. TTH 9–10:15

ENAS 541a/CB&B 523a/MB&B 523a/PHYS 523a, Biological Physics Corey O’Hern

An introduction to the physics of several important biological phenomena including transport in the cell cytoplasm, protein folding, DNA packaging, and thermodynamics of protein binding and aggregation. The material and approach are positioned at the interface of the physical and biological sciences, and involve significant computation. This course teaches the basics of computer programming necessary for quantitative studies of biological systems. We start with the foundations of programming in MATLAB. During the course, students perform sophisticated data analyses, view and analyze protein structures, and perform Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. No prior programming experience is needed. TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 549b, Biomedical Data Analysis Richard Carson

The course focuses on the analysis of biological and medical data associated with applications of biomedical engineering. It provides basics of probability and statistics, and analytical approaches for determination of quantitative biological parameters from noisy, experimental data. Programming in MATLAB to achieve these goals is a major portion of the course. Applications include Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics, Hodgkin-Huxley, neuroreceptor assays, receptor occupancy, MR spectroscopy, PET neuroimaging, brain image segmentation and reconstruction, and molecular diffusion.

ENAS 550au/C&MP 550au/MCDB 550au/PHAR 550a, Physiological Systems  Emile Boulpaep, Stuart Campbell

The course develops a foundation in human physiology by examining the homeostasis of vital parameters within the body, and the biophysical properties of cells, tissues, and organs. Basic concepts in cell and membrane physiology are synthesized through exploring the function of skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscle. The physical basis of blood flow, mechanisms of vascular exchange, cardiac performance, and regulation of overall circulatory function are discussed. Respiratory physiology explores the mechanics of ventilation, gas diffusion, and acid-base balance. Renal physiology examines the formation and composition of urine and the regulation of electrolyte, fluid, and acid-base balance. Organs of the digestive system are discussed from the perspective of substrate metabolism and energy balance. Hormonal regulation is applied to metabolic control and to calcium, water, and electrolyte balance. The biology of nerve cells is addressed with emphasis on synaptic transmission and simple neuronal circuits within the central nervous system. The special senses are considered in the framework of sensory transduction. Weekly discussion sections provide a forum for in-depth exploration of topics. Graduate students evaluate research findings through literature review and weekly meetings with the instructor. MWF 9:25–10:15

ENAS 551aU, Biotransport and Kinetics Kathryn Miller-Jensen

Creation and critical analysis of models of biological transport and reaction processes. Topics include mass and heat transport, biochemical interactions and reactions, and thermodynamics. Examples from diverse applications, including drug delivery, biomedical imaging, and tissue engineering. TTH 11:35–12:50

ENAS 553a, Immuno-Engineering Tarek Fahmy

An advanced class that introduces immunology principles and methods to engineering students. The course focuses on biophysical principles and biomaterial applications in understanding and engineering immunity. The course is divided into three parts. The first part introduces the immune system: organs, cells, and molecules. The second part introduces biophysical characterization and quantitative modeling in understanding immune system interactions. The third part focuses on intervention, modulation, and techniques for studying the immune system with emphasis on applications of biomaterials for intervention and diagnostics. MW 2:30–3:45

[ENAS 554bU, Continuum Biomechanics]

ENAS 555bU, Vascular Mechanics Jay Humphrey

This course is designed to enable students to apply methods of continuum biomechanics to study diverse vascular conditions and treatments, including aging, atherosclerosis, aneurysms, effects of hypertension, design of tissue-engineered constructs, and vein grafts from an engineering perspective. Emphasis is placed on ensuring that the mechanics is driven by advances in the vascular mechanobiology. TTH 2:30–3:45

[ENAS 557bU, Musculoskeletal Biomechanics]

ENAS 558aU, Introduction to Biomechanics Jay Humphrey

An introduction to the biomechanics used in biosolid mechanics, biofluid mechanics, biothermomechanics, and biochemomechanics. Diverse aspects of biomedical engineering, from basic mechanobiology to characterization of materials behaviors and the design of medical devices and surgical interventions. MW 11:35–12:50

ENAS 561b/AMTH 765b/CB&B 562b/INP 562b/MB&B 562bU/MCDB 562bU/PHYS 562b, Dynamical Systems in Biology Damon Clark, Jonathon Howard

This course covers advanced topics in computational biology. How do cells compute, how do they count and tell time, how do they oscillate and generate spatial patterns? Topics include time-dependent dynamics in regulatory, signal-transduction, and neuronal networks; fluctuations, growth, and form; mechanics of cell shape and motion; spatially heterogeneous processes; diffusion. This year, the course spends roughly half its time on mechanical systems at the cellular and tissue level, and half on models of neurons and neural systems in computational neuroscience. Prerequisite: MCDB 561a or equivalent, or a 200-level biology course, or permission of the instructor. TTH 2:30–3:45

[ENAS 563bu, Fault Tolerant Computer Systems] 

ENAS 564bu, Tissue Engineering Laura Niklason

Introduction to the major aspects of tissue engineering, including materials selection and information on synthetic and natural scaffolds; cell biology considerations including cues for replication, differentiation, adhesion, and senescence; bioreactor design at laboratory and commercial scale and bioreactor design considerations; and tissue- and organ-level physiology with a focus on design criteria for engineered tissue replacements. Course involves team laboratory project to engineer a connective tissue. Class sessions include lectures and hands-on laboratory work. MW 9:25–10:15, W 2:30–4:30

ENAS 566aU, Engineering of Drug Delivery W. Mark Saltzman

Drug delivery is a field of biomedical engineering that aims to develop approaches and technologies for getting pharmaceutical agents into particular cells and tissues in the body for a biological effect, while minimizing unwanted toxic or side effects. The course describes two interrelated fields of study: (1) mathematical descriptions of the biological barriers to drug delivery (diffusion, permeation through membranes, lifetime of circulation); and (2) engineering design to improve drug delivery. Prerequisite: ENAS 551a. MW 9–10:15

ENAS 567bU, Systems Biology of Cell Signaling Andre Levchenko

This course designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students is focused on systems biology approaches to the fundamental processes underlying the sensory capability of individual cells and cell-cell communication in health and disease. The course is designed to provide deep treatment of both the biological underpinnings and mathematical modeling of the complex events involved in signal transduction. As such, it can be attractive to students of biology, bioengineering, biophysics, computational biology, and applied math. The class is part of the planned larger track in systems biology, being one of its final, more specialized courses. In spite of this, each lecture has friendly introduction to the specific topic of interest, aiming to provide sufficient refreshment of the necessary knowledge. The topics have been selected to represent both cutting-edge directions in systems analysis of signaling processes and exciting settings to explore, making learning complex notions more enjoyable. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of biochemistry and cell biology, as well as programming experience and basic notions from probability theory and differential equations. MW 4–5:15

ENAS 570bu/C&MP 560bu/MCDB 560bu/PHAR 560b, Cellular and Molecular Physiology: Molecular Machines in Human Disease Emile Boulpaep, Fred Sigworth

The course focuses on understanding the processes that transfer molecules across membranes at the cellular, molecular, biophysical, and physiological levels. Students learn about the different classes of molecular machines that mediate membrane transport, generate electrical currents, or perform mechanical displacement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the molecular structures of membrane proteins and their individual functions. The interactions among transport proteins in determining the physiological behaviors of cells and tissues are also stressed. Molecular motors are introduced and their mechanical relationship to cell function is explored. Students read papers from the scientific literature that establish the connections between mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins and a wide variety of human genetic diseases. MWF 9:25–10:15

ENAS 575au/CPSC 575au, Computational Vision and Biological Perception  Steven Zucker

An overview of computational vision with a biological emphasis. Suitable as an introduction to biological perception for computer science and engineering students, as well as an introduction to computational vision for mathematics, psychology, and physiology students. MW 2:30–3:45

[ENAS 576bu/AMTH 667b/CPSC 576bu, Advanced Computational Vision]

ENAS 580a, Clinical Research in Biomedical Engineering W. Mark Saltzman, James Duncan

The course is designed to provide graduate students in Biomedical Engineering with a broad perspective of research topics in their field, with a particular focus on topics directed toward clinically oriented research. Students attend a series of lectures by speakers from both inside and outside the Yale BME research community covering the areas of biomaterials/tissue engineering, drug delivery systems, biomechanics, and bioimaging. The week after each lecture, students gather to address questions posed by the lecturing faculty and the course organizers, with discussion led by the students themselves. In addition, each student picks a topic related to one of the lectures given during the term and submits an extended written analysis. T 4–5:50

ENAS 585au, Fundamentals of Neuroimaging Fahmeed Hyder, Douglas Rothman

The neuroenergetic and neurochemical basis of several dominant neuroimaging methods, including fMRI. Topics range from technical aspects of different methods to interpretation of the neuroimaging results. Controversies and/or challenges for application of fMRI and related methods in medicine are identified. W 3:30–5:30

ENAS 600au, Computer-Aided Engineering Marshall Long

Aspects of computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM). The computer’s role in the mechanical design and manufacturing process; commercial tools for two- and three-dimensional drafting and assembly modeling; finite-element analysis software for modeling mechanical, thermal, and fluid systems.

[ENAS 601a, Materials Chemistry]

ENAS 602b, Chemical Reaction Engineering Eric Altman

Applications of physical-chemical and chemical-engineering principles to the design of chemical process reactors. Ideal reactors treated in detail in the first half of the course, practical homogeneous and catalytic reactors in the second. TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 603a, Energy, Mass, and Momentum Processes Michael Loewenberg

Application of continuum mechanics approach to the understanding and prediction of fluid flow systems that may be chemically reactive, turbulent, or multiphase.

[ENAS 605b, Colloidal Chemical Engineering]

[ENAS 606b, Polymer Physics]

[ENAS 608b, Surface and Surface Processes]

ENAS 609b, Nanotechnology for Energy Lisa Pfefferle

This is a comprehensive course with content at the intersection of nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, including application areas and nanofabrication technique. Topics include nanoscaled photovoltaic cells, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and nanoelectronics; layer-by-layer assembly; organic-inorganic mesostructures; colloidal crystals, organic monolayers, proteins, DNA and abalone shells; synthesis of carbon nanotubes, nanowire, and nanocrystals; microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) devices; photolithography, electron beam lithography, and scanning probe lithography; lithium-based batteries; and nanomanufacturing (roll to roll, nanoimprint lithography, inkjet printing).

ENAS 610au, Biomolecular Engineering Corey Wilson

A survey of the principles and scope of biomolecular engineering. Discussion of concepts at the interface of applied mathematics, biology, biophysical chemistry, and chemical engineering that are used to develop novel molecular tools, materials, and approaches based on biological building blocks and machinery. Modeling the physicochemical properties that confer function in biological systems; low- and high-resolution protein engineering; the design of synthetic interactomes.

ENAS 611au, Separation Processes Lisa Pfefferle

Theory and design of separation processes for multicomputer and/or multiphase mixtures via equilibrium and rate phenomena. Included are single-stage and cascaded absorption, adsorption, extraction, distillation, filtration, and crystallization processes.

[ENAS 612aU, Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory]

[ENAS 614b, Surface and Thin-Film Characterization]

[ENAS 615a, Synthesis of Nanomaterials]

[ENAS 616b, Multiscale Modeling and Design in Biology]

[ENAS 618a, Principles and Practice of Heterogeneous Catalysis]

ENAS 626au, Chemical Engineering Process Control Eric Altman

Transient regime modeling and simulations of chemical processes. Conventional and state-space methods of analysis and control design. Applications of modern control methods in chemical engineering. Course work includes a design project.

[ENAS 628bu, Sensors and Biosensors]

ENAS 638a, Water Chemistry Desirée Plata

Aqueous inorganic chemistry for environmental engineering. Topics include acid-base chemistry, alkalinity, the carbonate system, speciation, precipitation/dissolution, redox chemistry, Eh/pH diagrams.

[ENAS 639a, Management of Water Resources and Environmental Systems]

ENAS 640b/F&ES 707bu, Aquatic Chemistry Gaboury Benoit

A detailed examination of the principles governing chemical reactions in water. Emphasis is on developing the ability to predict the aqueous chemistry of natural and perturbed systems based on a knowledge of their biogeochemical setting. Focus is on inorganic chemistry, and topics include elementary thermodynamics, acid-base equilibria, alkalinity, speciation, solubility, mineral stability, redox chemistry, and surface complexation reactions. Illustrative examples are taken from the aquatic chemistry of estuaries, lakes, rivers, wetlands, soils, aquifers, and the atmosphere. A standard software package used to predict chemical equilibria may also be presented.

ENAS 641au, Biological Processes in Environmental Engineering Jordan Peccia

Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry, including stoichiometry, kinetics, and energetics of biochemical reactions, microbial growth, and microbial ecology, as they pertain to biological processes for the transformation of environmental contaminants; principles for analysis and design of aerobic and anaerobic processes, including suspended- and attached-growth systems, for treatment of conventional and hazardous pollutants in municipal and industrial wastewaters and in groundwater.

ENAS 642b, Environmental Physicochemical Processes Menachem Elimelech

Fundamental and applied concepts of physical and chemical (“physicochemical”) processes relevant to water quality control. Topics include chemical reaction engineering, overview of water and wastewater treatment plants, colloid chemistry for solid-liquid separation processes, physical and chemical aspects of coagulation, coagulation in natural waters, filtration in engineered and natural systems, adsorption, membrane processes, disinfection and oxidation, disinfection by-products. TTH 2:30–3:45

ENAS 643b, Transport and Fate of Organic Chemicals in the Environment  Desirée Plata

Fundamental chemical and physical processes controlling the distribution, transport, and transformation of anthropogenic organic chemicals in aqueous environments including soils, sediments, and groundwater. The course provides basic knowledge about the following: the use of chemical and physical principles to quantify the thermodynamics and kinetics of individual processes; the use of chemical structure to understand these processes at the molecular level; and a framework for evaluation of the relative importance of these processes so that the fate of a particular chemical in a particular environment may be predicted.

[ENAS 644b, Environmental Chemical Kinetics]

ENAS 645a/F&ES 884a, Industrial Ecology Marian Chertow, Edgar Hertwich

Industrial ecology studies (1) the flows of materials and energy in industrial and consumer activities, (2) the effects of these flows on the environment, and (3) the influences of economic, political, regulatory, and social factors on the flow, use, and transformation of resources. The goals of the course are to define and describe industrial ecology; to demonstrate the relationships among production, consumption, sustainability, and industrial ecology in diverse settings, from firms to cities to international trade flows; to show how industrial ecology serves as a framework for the consideration of environmental and sustainability-related aspects of science, technology, and policy; and to define and describe tools, applications, and implications of industrial ecology. MW 1–2:15

[ENAS 646b/F&ES 714bU, Environmental Hydrology]

[ENAS 648au, Environmental Transport Processes]

ENAS 649a/MGT 611a, Policy Modeling Edward Kaplan

Building on earlier course work in quantitative analysis and statistics, Policy Modeling provides an operational framework for exploring the costs and benefits of public policy decisions. The techniques employed include “back of the envelope” probabilistic models, Markov processes, queuing theory, and linear/integer programming. With an eye toward making better decisions, these techniques are applied to a number of important policy problems. In addition to lectures, assigned articles and text readings, and short problem sets, students are responsible for completing a take-home midterm exam and a number of cases. In some instances, it is possible to take a real problem from formulation to solution, and compare the student’s own analysis to what actually happened. Prerequisites: Decision Analysis and Game Theory, Data Analysis and Statistics, or a demonstrated proficiency in quantitative methods.

[ENAS 655au, Environmental Risk Assessment]

[ENAS 658a, MEMS Design]

ENAS 660bu/F&ES 885b, Green Engineering and Sustainability Julie Zimmerman

This hands-on course highlights the key approaches to advancing sustainability through engineering design. The class begins with discussions on sustainability, metrics, general design processes, and challenges to sustainability. The current approach to design, manufacturing, and disposal is discussed in the context of examples and case studies from various sectors. This provides a basis for what and how to consider when designing products, processes, and systems to contribute to furthering sustainability. The fundamental engineering design topics to be addressed include toxicity and benign alternatives, pollution prevention and source reduction, separations and disassembly, material and energy efficiencies and flows, systems analysis, biomimicry, and life cycle design, management, and analysis. Students tackle current engineering and product design challenges in a series of class exercises and a final design project. MW 1–2:15

[ENAS 673bU, Air Quality and Energy]

ENAS 703aU, Introduction to Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology

Survey of nanomaterial synthesis methods and current nanotechnologies. Approaches to synthesizing nanomaterials; characterization techniques; device applications that involve nanoscale effects.

ENAS 704a, Theoretical Fluid Dynamics Juan de la Mora

Derivation of the equations of fluid motion from basic principles. Potential theory, viscous flow, flow with vorticity. Topics in hydrodynamics, gas dynamics, stability, and turbulence. TTH 11:35–12:50

[ENAS 705b/MB&B 715b/PHYS 705b, Numerical Simulations of Liquids]

[ENAS 708a, Fundamentals of Combustion]

[ENAS 711bU, Biomedical Microtechnology and Nanotechnology]

[ENAS 718au, Heterojunction Devices]

ENAS 725bU/APHY 725bU, Advanced Synchrotron Techniques and Electron Spectroscopy of Materials Charles Ahn

This course provides descriptions of advanced concepts in synchrotron X-ray and electron-based methodologies for studies of a wide-range of materials at atomic and nano-scales. Topics include X-ray and electron interactions with matter, X-ray scattering and diffraction, X-ray spectroscopy and inelastic methods, time-resolved applications, X-ray imaging and microscopy, photo-electron spectroscopy, electron microscopy and spectroscopy, among others. Emphasis is on applying the fundamental knowledge of these advanced methodologies to real-world materials studies in a variety of scientific disciplines. T 1:30–3:20

ENAS 747au, Applied Numerical Methods I Beth Anne Bennett

The derivation, analysis, and implementation of various numerical methods. Topics include root-finding methods, numerical solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations, eigenvalue/eigenvector approximation, polynomial-based interpolation, and numerical integration. Additional topics such as computational cost, error analysis, and convergence are addressed in a variety of contexts. TTH 11:35–12:50

[ENAS 748bu, Applied Numerical Methods II]

[ENAS 752a, Solidification and Phase Transformations]

[ENAS 758bU, Multiscale Models of Biomechanical Systems]

[ENAS 777, Introduction to Robot Analysis]

[ENAS 787b, Forces on the Nanoscale]

[ENAS 802au, Nano and Microsystem Technology]

ENAS 805bU, Biotechnology and the Developing World Anjelica Gonzalez

This interactive course explores how advances in biotechnology enhance the quality of life in the developing world. Implementing relevant technologies in developing countries is not without important challenges; technical, practical, social, and ethical aspects of the growth of biotechnology are explored. Readings from Biomedical Engineering for Global Health as well as recent primary literature; case studies, in-class exercises, and current events presentations. Guest lecturers include biotechnology researchers, public policy ethicists, preventive research physicians, public-private partnership specialists, and engineers currently implementing health-related technologies in developing countries. TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 806bu, Photovoltaic Energy Minjoo Lee

Electricity from photovoltaic solar cells is receiving increasing attention due to growing world demand for clean power sources. This course primarily emphasizes device physics of photovoltaics; statistics of charge carriers in and out of equilibrium; design of solar cells; and optical, electrical, and structural properties of semiconductors relevant to photovoltaics. Two laboratory sessions and a final project aid students in understanding both the applications and limitations of photovoltaic technology. The main objectives of this course are to equip students with the necessary background and analytical skills to understand and assess established and emerging photovoltaic technologies; to familiarize students with the diverse range of photovoltaic materials; and to connect materials properties to aspects of cell design, processing, and performance.

[ENAS 812b/INP 612b, Molecular Transport and Intervention in the Brain]

[ENAS 821bu, Physics of Medical Imaging]

ENAS 825b, Physics of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Vivo Graeme Mason, Robin de Graaf

The physics of chemical measurements performed with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, with special emphasis on applications to measurement studies in living tissue. Concepts that are common to magnetic resonance imaging are introduced. Topics include safety, equipment design, techniques of spectroscopic data analysis, and metabolic modeling of dynamic spectroscopic measurements. MW 11:35–12:50

ENAS 830b, Biomedical Optical Imaging Michael Choma

This course is an introduction to biomedical imaging using light. It covers different mechanisms of image formation as well as the physical properties of light that enable these different mechanisms. There is a particular emphasis on confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography. The course also discusses the clinical use of biomedical optical imaging. Prerequisites: prior course work in medical imaging and/or optics is preferable. Please contact the instructor with questions. M 9:25–11:15

[ENAS 836au, Biophotonics and Optical Microscopy]

[ENAS 848a/PHYS 528a, Soft Condensed Matter Physics]

ENAS 850au and 851bu/APHY 548au and 549bU/PHYS 548au and 549bu, Solid State Physics I and II Victor Henrich [F], Michel Devoret [Sp]

A two-term sequence covering the principles underlying the electrical, thermal, magnetic, and optical properties of solids, including crystal structures, phonons, energy bands, semiconductors, Fermi surfaces, magnetic resonance, phase transitions, and superconductivity. Fall: TTH 1–2:15; Spring: TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 866aU, CMOS Transistors and Beyond Tso-Ping Ma

This course covers the science and technology of current and future CMOS devices, including transistor physics, device processing, and characterization. In addition to weekly lectures, students are expected to make an in-depth study of a relevant topic (to be determined jointly with the instructor), write a term paper, and make an associated oral presentation to the class. T 3:30–5:30

[ENAS 875au, Introduction to VLSI System Design]

ENAS 880a/INP 523a, Imaging Drugs in the Brain Evan Morris, Kelly Cosgrove, Michelle Hampson

Seminar course to explore the uses of PET, SPECT, and fMRI to study the mechanisms of action and long-term effects of drugs (legal and illegal) on brain function. Basic research is the main focus, augmented by two class periods allotted to uses of imaging in drug development by Pharma. Syllabus is comprised of review articles, book chapters, and journal articles. Some class periods begin with a short lecture to cover methodological concepts, followed by discussion of reading material. Topics include basic understanding of imaging technology (physics, biochemistry, and mathematics) as it relates to imaging of drugs, receptors, neurotransmitters; understanding the primary outcomes of imaging experiments; imaging experiment design; recent findings related to drug abuse; common neurophysiological pathways of addictive drugs (how to image reward); and uses of imaging in drug development (what do drug companies want to measure?). T 3:30–5:20

ENAS 900b, Distributed Computation and Decision Making A. Stephen Morse

Within the field of network science there has long been interest in distributed computation and distributed decision-making problems of many types. Among these are consensus and flocking problems, the multi-robot rendezvous problem, distributed averaging, distributed solutions to linear algebraic equations, social networking problems, localization of sensors in a multisensor network, and the distributed management of robotic formations. The aim of this course is to explain what these problems are and to discuss their solutions. Related concepts from spectral graph theory, rigid graph theory, non­homogeneous Markov chain theory, stability theory, and linear system theory are covered. Prerequisite: although most of the mathematics needed are covered in the lectures, students taking this course should have a working understanding of basic linear algebra.

ENAS 902aU, Linear Systems A. Stephen Morse

Background linear algebra; finite-dimensional, linear-continuous, and discrete dynamical systems; state equations, pulse and impulse response matrices, weighting patterns, transfer matrices. Stability, Lyapunov’s equation, controllability, observability, system reduction, minimal realizations, equivalent systems, McMillan degree, Markov matrices. Recommended for all students interested in feedback control, signal and image processing, robotics, econometrics, and social and biological networks. MW 1–2:15

ENAS 907aU, Computer Architectures for Cognitive Processing and Machine Learning Richard Lethin

Introduction to the development of computer architectures specialized for cognitive processing, both offline “thinking machines” as well as embedded devices. History of machines starting with early conceptions in defense systems to contemporary initiatives. Instruction sets, memory systems, parallel processing, analog architectures, probabilistic architectures, graph computing architectures, machine-learning architectures. Application and algorithm characteristics. TH 1:30–3:20

[ENAS 912aU, Biomedical Image Processing and Analysis]

[ENAS 913b, Probability and Estimation Theory for Image Analysis]

[ENAS 915b, Tracer Kinetics and Modeling]

[ENAS 920b, Programming for Image Analysis]

[ENAS 921a, Advanced Topics in Computer Engineering]

ENAS 930bU, Energy Semiconductor Fundamentals Jung Han

Topics to include semiconductor physics, optical properties, electrical transport properties, thermal properties, and piezoelectric properties. TTH 9–10:15

ENAS 936au, Systems and Control Kumpati Narendra

Design of feedback control systems with applications to engineering, biological, and economic systems. Topics include stat-space representation, stability, controllability, and observability of discrete-time systems; system identification; optimal control of systems with multiple outputs. TTH 11:35–12:50

ENAS 938bU, Neural Networks for Pattern Recognition, Identification, and Control  Kumpati Narendra

Following a brief introduction to the theory of artificial neural networks and linear adaptive control, the course discusses in detail adaptive identification and control problems in nonlinear dynamical systems. Students work on individual projects, and the final grade depends on their performance in the midterm, problem sets, and the final project report. Prerequisite: ENAS 936a or permission of the instructor. TTH 11:35–12:50

ENAS 944bU, Digital Communications Systems Wenjun Hu

An introduction to the rapidly expanding field of mobile and fixed, voice and data communications systems. A review of analog and digital signals and their time and frequency domain representations. Topics include modulation methods, including amplitude; frequency and time division multiplexing for continuous and discrete/digital signals; an overview of modern voice and data communications networks; and an overview of information theory, including entropy, the quantification of information, data rates, coding, and compression. Examples and demonstrations are drawn from radio, telephone, television, computer, cellular, and satellite communications networks. MW 9–10:15

ENAS 951bU, Wireless Communications Wenjun Hu

This course aims to weave together fundamental theory of wireless communications, its application, and the design and implementation of wireless network architectures. The concepts are illustrated using examples such as WiFi and LTE. Particular emphasis is placed on the interplay between concepts and their implementation in real systems. Students can expect to learn background knowledge of some everyday wireless technologies and how to design systems based on the fundamental communications concepts. MW 9–10:15

ENAS 954bU/STAT 664bU, Information Theory Yihong Wu

Foundations of information theory in communications, statistical inference, statistical mechanics, probability, and algorithmic complexity. Quantities of information and their properties: entropy, conditional entropy, divergence, redundancy, mutual information, channel capacity. Basic theorems of data compression, data summarization, and channel coding. Applications in statistics. TTH 9–10:15

[ENAS 960au/CPSC 536aU, Networked Embedded Systems and Sensor Networks]

ENAS 962a, Theoretical Challenges in Network Science Amin Karbasi

This is an interdisciplinary course with a focus on the emerging science of complex networks and their mathematical models. Students learn about the recent research on the structure and analysis of such networks, and on models that abstract their basic properties. Topics include random graphs and their properties, probabilistic techniques for link analysis, centralized and decentralized search algorithms, random walks, diffusion and epidemic processes, and spectral methods. TTH 1–2:15

ENAS 963b, Network Algorithms and Stochastic Optimization Leandros Tassiulas

This course focuses on resource allocation models as well as associated algorithms and design and optimization methodologies that capture the intricacies of complex networking systems in communications computing as well as transportation, manufacturing, and energy systems. Max-weight scheduling, back-pressure routing, wireless opportunistic scheduling, time-varying topology network control, and energy-efficient management are sample topics to be considered, in addition to Lyapunov stability and optimization, stochastic ordering, and notions of fairness in network resource consumption. TTH 9–10:15

[ENAS 964b, Communication Networks]

ENAS 967aU, Computer Organization and Architecture Jakub Szefer

Introduction to computer architecture, including computer organization, microprocessors, caches and memory hierarchies, I/O, and storage. Issues involving performance, energy, and security; processor benchmarking. Selected readings from current academic literature. TTH 2:30–3:45

ENAS 986bu, Semiconductor Silicon Devices and Technology Tso-Ping Ma

Introduction to integrated circuit technology, theory of solid state devices, and principles of device design and fabrication. Laboratory involves the fabrication and analysis of semiconductor devices, including Ohmic contacts, Schottky diodes, p-n junctions, MOS capacitors, MOSFETS, and integrated circuits. MW 9–10:15

ENAS 990a and b, Special Investigations

Faculty-supervised individual projects with emphasis on research, laboratory, or theory. Students must define the scope of the proposed project with the faculty member who has agreed to act as supervisor, and submit a brief abstract to the director of graduate studies for approval.

ENAS 994bU, Mechatronics Laboratory 

Hands-on synthesis of control systems, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. Review of Laplace transforms, transfer functions, software tools for solving ODEs. Review of electronic components and introduction to electronic instrumentation. Introduction to sensors; mechanical power transmission elements; programming microcontrollers; PID control.

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English Language and Literature

Linsly-Chittenden Hall, 203.432.2233

http://english.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Langdon Hammer [F]

Ruth Bernard Yeazell [Sp]

Director of Graduate Studies

Ardis Butterfield (106a LC, 203.432.2226, graduate.english@yale.edu)

Professors Jessica Brantley, Leslie Brisman, David Bromwich, Ardis Butterfield, Jill Campbell, Janice Carlisle (on leave [Sp]), Joe Cleary, Michael Denning, Wai Chee Dimock, Roberta Frank, Paul Fry (on leave [F]), Jacqueline Goldsby, Langdon Hammer, Margaret Homans (on leave [Sp]), Amy Hungerford, David Scott Kastan, Jonathan Kramnick (on leave), Lawrence Manley, Stefanie Markovits (on leave [F]), Alastair Minnis (on leave [Sp]), Stephanie Newell, Caryl Phillips (on leave [Sp]), David Quint, Joseph Roach, Marc Robinson, John Rogers, Caleb Smith (on leave), Robert Stepto (on leave [F]), Katie Trumpener (on leave [F]), Michael Warner, Ruth Bernard Yeazell

Associate Professors Catherine Nicholson, Anthony Reed (on leave [F]), R. John Williams

Assistant Professors Marta Figlerowicz, Benjamin Glaser (on leave [F]), Joseph North, Jill Richards (on leave), Sunny Xiang

Fields of Study

Fields include English language and literature from Old English to the present, American literature, and Anglophone world literature.

Special Admissions Requirements

Application should be accompanied by scores from the GRE and the GRE “Literature in English” subject test, a personal statement of purpose, and a writing sample of up to twenty pages.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

In order to fulfill the basic requirements for the program, a student must:

  • 1. Complete twelve courses—six courses with at least one grade of Honors and a maximum of one grade of Pass by July 15 following the first year; at least twelve courses with grades of Honors in at least four of these courses and not more than one Pass by July 15 following the second year. One of these twelve courses must be The Teaching of English (ENGL 990). Courses selected must include one medieval, one early-modern, one eighteenth- and/or nineteenth-century, one twentieth- and/or twenty-first-century.
  • 2. Satisfy the language requirement by the end of the second year. Two languages appropriate to the student’s field of specialization, each to be demonstrated by (a) passing a translation exam administered by a Yale language department or (for languages not tested elsewhere at Yale) by the English department; (b) passing an advanced literature course at Yale (graduate or upper-level undergraduate, with DGS approval); or (c) passing both ENGL 500 and ENGL 501.
  • 3. Pass the oral examination before or as early as possible in the fifth term of residence. The exam consists of questions on five topics, developed by the student in consultation with examiners and subject to approval by the DGS.
  • 4. Submit a dissertation prospectus, normally by January 15 of the third year.
  • 5. Teach a minimum of two terms.
  • 6. Submit a dissertation.

Upon completion of all predissertation requirements, including the prospectus, students are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. Admission to candidacy must take place by the end of the third year of study.

Combined Ph.D. Programs

English and African American Studies

The Department of English Language and Literature also offers, in conjunction with the Department of African American Studies, a combined Ph.D. degree in English Language and Literature and African American Studies. For further details, see African American Studies.

English and Film and Media Studies

The Department of English Language and Literature also offers, in conjunction with the Film and Media Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. degree in English Language and Literature and Film and Media Studies. For further details, see Film and Media Studies.

English and Renaissance Studies

The Department of English Language and Literature also offers, in conjunction with the Renaissance Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in English Language and Literature and Renaissance Studies. For further details, see Renaissance Studies.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations. Additionally, students in English are eligible to pursue a supplemental M.Phil. degree in Medieval Studies. For further details, see Medieval Studies.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program may receive the M.A. upon completion of seven courses with at least one grade of Honors and a maximum of one grade of Pass, and the passing of one foreign language.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program Students enrolled in the master’s degree program must complete either seven term courses or six term courses and a special project within the English department (one or two of these courses may be taken in other departments with approval of the DGS). There must be at least one grade of Honors, and there may not be more than one grade of Pass. Students must also demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language (as described under Ph.D. Requirements, above).

Courses

For expanded course descriptions, please visit the English department Web site: http://english.yale.edu/courses.

ENGL 500a/LING 500a, Introduction to Old English Language and Literature  Roberta Frank

The essentials of the language, some prose readings, and close study of several celebrated Old English poems. TTH 9–10:15

ENGL 501b/LING 501b, Beowulf and the Northern Heroic Tradition Roberta Frank

A close reading of Beowulf, with some attention to shorter heroic poems. W 9:25–11:15

ENGL 545a/CPLT 582a/FREN 802a, Medieval Translation Ardis Butterfield

Using modern postcolonial as well as medieval theories of translation, memory, and bilingualism we explore how texts are transformed, cited, and reinvented in the medieval period. What happens to language under the pressure of crosslingual reading practices? How can the freedom and inventiveness of medieval poetic practices illuminate modern theories of translation? Texts include material in French, English, Latin, and Italian. Proficiency in any one or more of these languages is welcome, but every effort will be made to use texts available in modern English translation, so as to include as wide a participation as possible in the course. W 9:25–11:15

ENGL 548a/CPLT 670a/ITAL 601a, Ariosto and Cervantes David Quint

The year 2016 marks the 500th anniversary of the Orlando furioso and the 400th anniversary of the death of Cervantes. This course reads the Orlando furioso, Ariosto’s Cinque canti, and Don Quijote as depictions of the crisis of chivalry, and it charts, in the case of Don Quijote, the birth of the modern novel. It examines the use in these works of mirroring episodes—entrelacement—and interpolated tales. It also looks at similar techniques in Apuleius’s The Golden Ass, in the Thousand and One Nights, and in Sir Philip Sidney’s New Arcadia. T 10:30–12:20

ENGL 551a, Spenser’s Readers Catherine Nicholson

This course has two complementary, though sometimes divergent, objects of interest: the first is the poetry of Edmund Spenser, particularly his immense allegorical epic-romance, The Faerie Queene; the second is that poem’s varied and often vexed reception history, from the late sixteenth century through the present. The Faerie Queene is a poem about interpretation—its pleasures and its discontents—and we often find ourselves reading over the shoulders of readers in the poem. But it is also possible to read the poem through the eyes of other historical readers, adopting their (often alien) expectations, ambitions, and preoccupations as a way of discovering new things in the text and of reflecting on the biases and assumptions of our own critical practices. In this sense, this is a course about readerly methods and the history of reading as well as a course about Spenser, and participants whose primary interests lie outside the English Renaissance are warmly welcomed. TH 1:30–3:20

ENGL 561a, Studies in Seventeenth-Century English Literature John Rogers

A survey of seventeenth-century poetry and prose, exclusive of Milton. Authors include Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Herbert, Browne, Crashaw, Marvell, Cavendish, Bunyan, and Dryden. T 1:30–3:20

ENGL 623b, Jacobean Shakespeare Lawrence Manley

A study of Shakespeare’s later plays, emphasizing form and dramaturgy, in relation to works by his contemporaries and to the institutions of the Jacobean theater. Nine plays by Shakespeare and masques and plays by Marston, Middleton, Chapman, Tourneur, Webster, and Beaumont and Fletcher. M 3:30–5:20

ENGL 708b/AFAM 705b/AMST 708b/HIST 708b/HSHM 729b, The History of Race  Greta LaFleur

This course offers a broad survey of the history of racial science and racialist thinking in the Atlantic world from the early modern period through the late nineteenth century. Rather than attempting to detail the histories of specific racial formations (such as blackness or whiteness), the course tracks the intellectual history of the emergence of “race” as a specific category of human differentiation and traces a swath of its most muscular—and pernicious—permutations through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. W 1:30–3:20

ENGL 742b/WGSS 769b, Fiction, Didacticism, and Political Critique: 1789–1818  Jill Campbell

A study of writings that seek a specific effect in their reader—whether didactic instruction and moral formation, or an instigation to take action toward political change—and their uneasy alliance in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries with the literary genre of prose fiction. How do writings that seek to inform or reform the real person or the real world put fictional narratives to use? How is the genre of the novel shaped, explicitly or implicitly, by writing to a specific “end”? Texts include novels, tales for children, life-writing, poetry with a “cause,” polemical essays; possible authors include Olaudah Equiano, Edmund Burke, William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Anna Barbauld, and Mary Shelley. T 1:30–3:20

ENGL 756a, The Possibilities of Romanticism: Byron, Shelley, Keats Paul Fry

Poetry and prose of Byron, Shelley, and Keats with emphasis on both their differences and their common qualities. Special attention is given to the complex interactions of these poets with Wordsworth and Coleridge. TH 10:30–12:20

ENGL 810bU, Victorian Poetry Leslie Brisman

The major Victorian poets, Tennyson and Browning, in the context of the romanticism they inherited and transformed. A selection of other Victorians whose genius or popularity warrants attention, including Morris, the Rossettis, Hardy, Swinburne, Hopkins, and Barrett Browning. MW 11:35–12:50

ENGL 838bU/AMST 775bU, Performing American Literature Wai Chee Dimock

A broad selection of short stories, poems, and novels, accompanied by class performances throughout the term, culminating in a term project with a significant writing component. “Performance” here includes a wide range of activities, from staging to the making of videos and films, digital game design, and the creative use of social media. Readings include poetry by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Claudia Rankine; fiction by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Junot Díaz. W 1:30–3:20

ENGL 853b/AMST 848b, Inventing the Environment in the Anthropocene  Michael Warner

Although the concept of the Anthropocene can be dated in various ways, two of the most important benchmarks seem to be the beginning of industrial production in the late eighteenth century and the uptick in carbon dioxide emissions from the mid-nineteenth century (petroleum came into use during the Civil War). The period between these two moments is also that in which the modern language of the environment took shape, from Cuvier’s discovery of extinction and Humboldt’s holistic earth science to the transformative work of Thoreau and George P. Marsh. This course shuttles between the contemporary debate about the significance and consequences of the Anthropocene and a reexamination of that environmental legacy. We look at the complexity of “nature,” beginning with the Bartrams, Jefferson, Cuvier, and the transatlantic literatures of natural history; georgics and other genres of nature writing; natural theology; ambiguities of pastoral in American romantic writing (Bryant, mainly); the impact of Humboldt (Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman); westward expansion and Native American writing about land; Hudson School painting and landscape architecture. We also think about the country/city polarity and the development of “grid” consciousness in places like New York City. One aim is to assess the formation and legacy of key ideas in environmentalism, some of which may now be a hindrance as much as a foundation. Secondary readings from Leo Marx, Henry Nash Smith, and William Cronon, as well as more recent attempts to reconceive environmental history (Joachim Radkau), ecocriticism (Lawrence Buell), and related fields, as well as science journalism (Elizabeth Kolbert). We attend and discuss Dipesh Chakrabarty’s Tanner lectures in February. Students are invited to explore a wide range of research projects; and one assignment is to devise a teaching unit for an undergraduate class on the same topic. TH 1:30–3:20

ENGL 911a, British Literature and Culture, 1930–1960 David Bromwich

Intensive survey of British literature from the depression to the Cold War. We begin with the later writings of Lawrence and Yeats, and end with John Osborne and Thom Gunn, allowing for particular attention to the careers of Orwell and Auden. Among the other assigned authors: Woolf, MacDiarmid, Churchill, Gandhi, Isherwood, Bowen, Amis, Larkin, Hughes, Greene, and Green; along with films by Michael Powell, Carol Reed, and Tony Richardson. T 1:30–3:20

ENGL 936b/AFST 746b, Postcolonial World Literature and Theory  Stephanie Newell

Introduction to key debates about post-1945 world literature in English, the politics of English as a language of world literature, and theories of globalization and postcolonial culture. Course themes include colonial history, postcolonial migration, translation, national identity, cosmopolitanism, writing the self, global literary prizes. TH 9:25–11:15

ENGL 938bU/AFAM 660bU/AFST 678bU/CPLT 678bU/JDST 678bU, The Literatures of Blacks and Jews in the Twentieth Century Marc Kaplan

This seminar compares representative writings by African, Caribbean, and African American authors of the past one hundred years, together with European, American, and South African Jewish authors writing in Yiddish, Hebrew, French, and English. This comparison examines the paradoxically central role played by minority, “marginal” groups in the creation of modern literature and the articulation of the modern experience. TH 1:30–3:20

ENGL 948bU/AFAM 588bU/AMST 710bU, Autobiography in America Robert Stepto

A study of autobiographical writings from Mary Rowlandson’s Indian captivity narrative (1682) to the present. Classic forms such as immigrant, education, and cause narratives; prevailing autobiographical strategies involving place, work, and photographs. Authors include Franklin, Douglass, Jacobs, Antin, Kingston, Uchida, Balakian, Als, and Karr. M 1:30–3:20

ENGL 950a/AFAM 514a/AMST 735a, A Sound Theory of Blackness: African American Literature and Music in High Fidelity Daphne Brooks

An exploration of sonic theory and the African American literary tradition from the nineteenth century through the millennium with special emphasis on major debates in jazz studies and a critical (re)examination of blues ideologies, as well as the politics and poetics of spirituals, R&B and soul, funk, Afrofuturism, punk, pop, and hip-hop. The course places the work of a range of cultural theorists (Douglass, Du Bois, Adorno, Hurston, Ellison, Murray, Baraka, Mackey, Carby, Spillers, O’Meally, Griffin, Moten, Edwards, Radano, Nancy, Szendy, Perry, Weheliye, etc.) in conversation with key texts and epochs in black letters. T 1:30–3:20

ENGL 953b/AMST 681b/DRAM 496b, The American Avant-Garde Marc Robinson

Topics include the Living Theater, Happenings, Cunningham/Cage, Open Theater, Judson Dance Theater, Grand Union, Bread and Puppet Theater, Ontological-Hysteric Theater, Theater of the Ridiculous, Meredith Monk, Robert Wilson, and the Wooster Group. TH 10–11:50

ENGL 955b/AFAM 793b/AMST 694b, Colonial Theater, Postcolonial Drama, and World Performance Joseph Roach

Uniting the approaches of theater history, dramaturgy, and performance studies, this seminar begins with the case study of Lolita Chakrabarti’s Red Velvet (2012, revived 2016), a play about the life of Ira Aldridge (1807–1867), the African American actor who is said to be the first black man to play Othello. Readings include plays, critical theories, and historical documents from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first. The seminar is organized around selected genealogies of performance as represented by adaptations, revivals, and critical rewritings: Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko by Thomas Southerne and Biyi Bandele-Thomas; John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera by Bertolt Brecht, Wole Soyinka, and P.L. Deshpande; Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Derek Walcott; and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot by Femi Osofisan and Suzan-Lori Parks. W 3:30–5:20

ENGL 973a, Modernity and the Time of Literature R. John Williams

This course examines transformations in temporality that occurred in the sciences and arts during the twentieth century. From the arrival of Einsteinian relativity to more contemporary proofs on quantum nonlocality, the question of time in the twentieth century threatened to overturn some of our oldest assumptions about cause and effect, duration, history, presentness, and futurity. These new temporalities were as scientifically and philosophically vexing as they were rife with spiritual and aesthetic possibility—a dynamic reflected in the literary and artistic forms that were central to these transformations. Our reading reflects this deeply cross-cultural and interdisciplinary trajectory, including histories of science and technology (Peter Galison, N. Katherine Hayles, David Kaiser), philosophies of time (Heidegger, Bruno Latour, Bernard Stiegler, McLuhan, Luhmann), critical theories of temporal form (Derrida, Adorno, Jameson, Pamela Lee, Kojin Karatani), a wide array of literary texts (William Burroughs, Thomas Pynchon, Ursula K. Le Guin, Tom McCarthy, and others), as well as important cinematic innovations (Jodorowsky, Godard, Kubrick). What is the “time” of literature? of film? How does art transform or reinforce theories of temporal flow? How do new technologies of composition and circulation alter the temporal effects of a given work? What was the “End of History”? W 3:30–5:20

ENGL 975b, Modernism and Historical Poetics Benjamin Glaser

Poetry and related writings from the first half of the twentieth century, with emphasis on expanding notions of modernism and recent critical reevaluations of poetic genres and forms. What, for instance, is the relation between new formalism and modernism’s “formal” poets (Yeats, Hart Crane, Stevens, Louise Bogan)? How do women poets (Bogan, Loy, Millay, Georgia Douglas Johnson) concerned with sentimentality and the figure of the poetess illuminate the role of gender in lyric theory? We look at Robert Frost and Sterling Brown to explore theories of voice and vernacular sound; read Eliot and Pound to rethink periodization and the emergence of literary criticism as an institution; and pursue the legacy of Stein, Williams, and others in debated canons of lyric, language, and conceptual poetry. The Beinecke’s Pound, H.D., Loy, and James Weldon Johnson collections serve as a starting point for exploring new work in modernism’s print and digital archives. T 10:30–12:20

ENGL 981a/AFAM 775a/AMST 771a, Affect Theory Tavia Nyong’o

This seminar traces the emergence of affect, sense, feeling, and mood as critical keywords in American studies. Particular attention is paid to the manner in which queer theorists such as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Lauren Berlant, Ann Cvetkovich, Heather Love, Jennifer Doyle, Jonathan Flatley, and José Esteban Muñoz developed the concept in what has been called “the affective turn” in queer and feminist aesthetics. The philosophical basis of affect theory in the writings of Spinoza, Heidegger, and Deleuze form the core of the seminar. We also look to an alternate genealogy for affect politics in the writings of Bergson and Deleuze on fabulation. We consider the psychoanalytic take on affect, in particular the object relations school of Klein and Winnicott, and we read critics who contrast affect theory with trauma theory. Marxist contributions to affect theory include readings from Virno (on humor), Hardt and Negri (on affective labor), and Rancière (on the distribution of the sensible). The writings of Jasbir Puar and Brian Massumi on the affective politics of contemporary war, empire, and societies of control are also considered, as are writings by Fred Moten, Saidiya Hartman, and Frank Wilderson on optimism and pessimism as moods/modalities of black studies. M 1:30–3:20

ENGL 990a, The Teaching of English Alfred Guy

An introduction to the teaching of literature and writing with attention to the history of the profession and current issues in higher education. Weekly seminars address a series of issues about teaching: guiding classroom discussion; introducing students to various literary genres; formulating aims and assignments; grading and commenting on written work; lecturing and serving as a teaching assistant; preparing syllabuses and lesson plans. W 1:30–3:20

ENGL 995a/b, Directed Reading

Designed to help fill gaps in students’ programs when there are corresponding gaps in the department’s offerings. By arrangement with faculty and with the approval of the DGS.

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European and Russian Studies

The MacMillan Center

332 Luce Hall, 203.432.3423

www.yale.edu/macmillan/europeanstudies

M.A.

Chair

Francesca Trivellato (History; on leave)

Acting Chair

Philip Gorski (Sociology)

Director of Graduate Studies

Bruce Gordon (Divinity; History; Religious Studies; 334 Luce, 203.432.3423)

Professors Bruce Ackerman (Law), Julia Adams (Sociology), Rolena Adorno (Spanish & Portuguese), Vladimir Alexandrov (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Dudley Andrew (Film & Media Studies), Seyla Benhabib (Political Science; on leave [Sp]), Dirk Bergemann (Economics), R. Howard Bloch (French), Paul Bracken (Management), David Bromwich (English), Paul Bushkovitch (History), David Cameron (Political Science), Francesco Casetti (Humanities; Film & Media Studies; on leave [Sp]), Katerina Clark (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Mirjan Damaška (Emeritus, Law), Carolyn Dean (History; on leave), Carlos Eire (History), Paul Franks (Philosophy), Paul Freedman (History), Bryan Garsten (Political Science), John Geanakoplos (Economics), Harvey Goldblatt (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Bruce Gordon (Divinity; History; Religious Studies), Philip Gorski (Sociology), Timothy Guinnane (Economics), Stathis Kalyvas (Political Science), David Scott Kastan (English), Paul Kennedy (History), John MacKay (Slavic Languages & Literatures; on leave [F]), Lawrence Manley (English), Ivan Marcus (History), Millicent Marcus (Italian), Stefanie Markovits (English; on leave [F]), Robert Nelson (History of Art; on leave [F]), Paul North (German), Steven Pincus (History), David Quint (English), Susan Rose-Ackerman (Law), Sophia Rosenfeld (History), Maurice Samuels (French), Frank Snowden (History), Timothy Snyder (History), Alec Stone Sweet (Law), Peter Swenson (Political Science; on leave [F]), Francesca Trivellato (History; on leave), Katie Trumpener (Comparative Literature; on leave [F]), Miroslav Volf (Divinity), Kirk Wetters (German), James Whitman (History), Keith Wrightson (History)

Associate Professors Molly Brunson (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Bella Grigoryan (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Karuna Mantena (Political Science), Douglas Rogers (Anthropology; on leave [F]), Marci Shore (History)

Assistant Professors Jennifer Allen (History), Marijeta Bozovic (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Sigrun Kahl (Political Science; Sociology), Isaac Nakhimovsky (History), Ayesha Ramachandran (Comparative Literature; on leave [F])

Senior Lectors Irina Dolgova (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Krystyna Illakowicz (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Maria Kaliambou (Hellenic Studies), Rita Lipson (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Constantine Muravnik (Slavic Languages & Literatures), George Syrimis (Hellenic Studies), Julia Titus (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Karen von Kunes (Slavic Languages & Literatures)

The European Studies Council promotes research programs about Europe’s culture, history, and current affairs. The geographical scope of the council’s activities extends from Ireland to Italy, and from Portugal to the lands of the former Soviet Union. The council’s definition of Europe transcends conventional divisions between Western, Central, and Eastern Europe, and includes the Balkans and Russia. The U.S. Department of Education has repeatedly designated the council a National Resource Center and a FLAS Center under its HEA Title VI program. Further information on the council and the Graduate Certificate of Concentration in European Studies is provided under Non-Degree-Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes in this bulletin.

The council administers an M.A. program in European and Russian Studies. This M.A. program is unusual in its embrace of the entire spectrum of European nations and cultures. Its requirements allow students to choose a particular national or thematic focus, geared to their individual interests and language skills, but also ensure that students acquaint themselves with the traditions and issues associated with the other parts of Europe. Students specializing in Russia and Eastern Europe, for example, will concentrate their efforts in that area, but will also take courses that address Europe-wide problems or the countries of Central or Western Europe. The program is suited both to students who wish to pursue further academic studies and to students whose interests are policy-oriented.

Fields of Study

European languages and literatures; economics; history; political science; law; music; sociology and other social sciences.

Special Requirements for the M.A. Degree

When applying to the program, students will specify as an area of primary concentration either (1) Russia and Eastern Europe, or (2) Central and Western Europe. All students must complete sixteen term courses (or their equivalent) in the various fields related to European and Russian studies. E&RS 900, Europe: Who, What, When, Where?, is required in addition to the sixteen courses and should be taken in the first year of the program. E&RS 900 is taken as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and may not be taken for audit.

Students are required to take at least one course in at least three of the four fields relevant to the program, that is, history (including history of art, history of science, and history of music), literature, social sciences, and law. Students can fulfill this three-field requirement by taking Europe-related graduate-level courses from across the University. One of the sixteen term courses may be taken for audit. With special approval under certain circumstances, a course graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory may count as one of the sixteen required courses. For students focusing on Russia and Eastern Europe, two of the sixteen required courses (excluding language courses) must concern the nations of Central and Western Europe. Conversely, for those focusing on Central and Western Europe, two courses must concern Russia and Eastern Europe.

For the purposes of this program, language courses in European languages count toward the sixteen required courses, even though they have undergraduate course numbers and undergraduate grade modes. If a student takes a language course to fulfill the 16-credit degree requirement, the language course may not be taken for audit. Students with previous language preparation may in certain cases receive documentation of their language proficiency on the basis of this work. By the time the degree is completed, all students must demonstrate at least L4 proficiency in two modern European languages other than English. Those wishing to focus on Russia and Eastern Europe will need to demonstrate knowledge of Russian or an Eastern European language; those focusing on Central and Western Europe will need to demonstrate knowledge of one of the appropriate languages. In all cases, students are required to demonstrate proficiency in two European languages by the end of the third term at Yale. The only exception to this rule is completion of the appropriate full sequence of Yale language classes, certified by the Yale instructor or the director of graduate studies. Students who wish to take Yale department examinations in French, German, Italian, Spanish, or other West European languages should register for a complete examination (with reading, oral, and grammar portions) with the appropriate Yale department. Students with Russian competence must receive the grade of 1+ or higher on the ACTFL/ETS Rating Scale as administered by the Slavic Languages and Literatures department at Yale, including reading, oral, and grammar portions. Students with competence in an East European language (such as Polish, Czech, Ukrainian, Hungarian, and others by special arrangement) or other European languages must take Yale department-administered examinations.

In all cases, students will comply with the Policies and Regulations of the Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, especially regarding degree requirements and academic standing.

Through agreements negotiated by the MacMillan Center, the European Studies Council offers joint master’s degrees with the Law School, the School of Management, the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and the School of Public Health. Application for admission must be made to both the Graduate School and the applicable professional school, with notation made on each application that this is to be considered for the joint-degree program. Refer to www.yale.edu/macmillan/joint.htm and contact the European Studies director of graduate studies (DGS) for up-to-date information.

The Master’s Thesis

A master’s thesis is required. The master’s thesis is based on research in a topic approved by the DGS and advised by a faculty member with specialized competence in the chosen topic. M.A. students must register for E&RS 950, which may count toward the sixteen required courses. E&RS 950 may not be taken for audit. Students may register for one additional independent study to prepare topics and begin research. The master’s thesis must be prepared according to department guidelines and is due in two copies in the student’s second year on an early-April date as specified by the council.

Program materials are available upon request to the European Studies Council, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206.

Courses

E&RS 900a, Europe: Who, What, When, Where? Bruce Gordon

An interdisciplinary seminar designed to provide broad exposure to key topics in modern European studies. Special attention is given to Eastern and Western Europe as well as the humanities and social science disciplines. The seminar is framed by some key theoretical questions, including: What are Europe’s boundaries? When and where is “Europe”? Is there a narrative to European history? If so, what is it? What makes a European? The seminar also focuses on developing academic writing skills and examining research methodologies. Seminar meetings are combined with the Europe in/and the World Colloquia and feature speakers from the Yale faculty and from other academic institutions. The course is required of all first-year European and Russian Studies M.A. students but is open to all graduate and professional students. W 3:30–5:20

E&RS 940a or b, Independent Study

By arrangement with faculty.

E&RS 950a or b, Master’s Thesis

By arrangement with faculty.

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Experimental Pathology

140 Brady Memorial Laboratory, 203.785.3624

http://medicine.yale.edu/pathology/education/graduateprogram

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Jon Morrow

Director of Graduate Studies

Themis Kyriakides (10 Amistad St., Rm. 301C, 203.737.2214)

Professors Richard Bucala (Internal Medicine), Young Choi (Emeritus), José Costa (Internal Medicine/Oncology), Gary Friedlaender (Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation), Patrick Gallagher (Pediatrics), Earl Glusac (Dermatology), Robert Homer, S. David Hudnall, Pei Hui, Peter Humphrey, Dhanpat Jain (Internal Medicine), Michael Kashgarian (Emeritus, Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Jung Kim (Emeritus), Diane Krause (Laboratory Medicine), Gary Kupfer (Pediatrics), Themis Kyriakides, Janina Longtine (Molecular Diagnostics; Laboratory Medicine), Joseph Madri (Emeritus), Vincent Marchesi (Director, Boyer Center for Molecular Medicine; Cell Biology), Jennifer McNiff (Dermatology), Wang Min, Mark Mooseker (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Jon Morrow (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), Jordan Pober (Immunobiology; Dermatology), Manju Prasad, David Rimm, Marie Robert (Internal Medicine), John Rose, Gerald Shadel (Genetics), John Sinard (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), Jeffrey Sklar (Laboratory Medicine), David Stern, A. Brian West (Emeritus), Wendall Yarbrough (Surgery/Otolaryngology)

Associate Professors Adebowale Adeniran, Marcus Bosenberg (Dermatology), Demetrios Braddock, Janet Brandsma (Adjunct; Comparative Medicine), Guoping Cai, Sandy Chang (Laboratory Medicine), Shawn Cowper (Dermatology), Carlos Fernandez-Hernando (Comparative Medicine), Liming Hao, Malini Harigopal, Steven Kleinstein, Yuval Kluger, Christine Ko (Dermatology), Diane Kowalski (Surgery/Otolaryngology), Michael Krauthammer, Gary Kupfer (Pediatrics), Rossitza Lazova (Dermatology), Gilbert Moeckel, Raffaella Morotti, Vinita Parkash, Antonio Subtil-Deoliveira (Dermatology), Alexander Vortmeyer, Zenta Walther, Qin Yan

Assistant Professors Rebecca Baldassarri, Andrea Barbieri, Ranjit Bindra (Therapeutic Radiology), Veerle Bossuyt, Natalia Buza, Keith Choate (Dermatology), Paul Cohen, Susan Fernandez, Karin Finberg, Anjela Galan (Dermatology), Joanna Gibson, Bonnie Gould Rothberg (Yale Cancer Center; Medicine), Shilpa Hattangadi (Pediatrics), Michael Hurwitz (Yale Cancer Center; Medicine), Anita Huttner, Ryan Jensen (Therapeutic Radiology), Anita Kamath, Samuel Katz, Angelique Levi, Don Nguyen, Marguerite Pinto, Katerina Politi (Yale Cancer Center), Yibing Qyang (Internal Medicine), Yajaira Suarez (Comparative Medicine), Narendra Wajapeyee, Mina Xu, Xuchen Zhang

Fields of Study

Fields include molecular and cellular basis of diseases, including cancer; biology, biochemistry, genetics, and pathology of molecules, cells, tissues, and organ systems, including plasma membrane dynamics, mitochondrial dysfunction, signal transduction, and response to stimuli of connective tissue; assembly of viruses and their interactions with animal cells; somatic cell genetics and birth defects; biology of endothelial cells; and computational and high-throughput approaches to understanding disease pathology.

Special Admissions Requirements

A strong background in basic sciences is recommended for applicants to the program, including biology, chemistry through organic and physical chemistry, mathematics through calculus, biochemistry, genetics, or immunology. GRE General Test or MCAT is required.

To enter the Ph.D. program, students apply to an interest-based track, usually the Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology track, within the interdepartmental graduate program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS), http://bbs.yale.edu.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Course requirements Experimental Pathology students must pass PATH 650b, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer, and PATH 690a, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease. Passes in three additional graduate-level, one-term courses are required, which can include courses in biochemistry, genetics, immunology, cell biology, and pathology, to be chosen in consultation with the director of graduate studies (DGS), according to the student’s background and interest. All requirements of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, including the Honors requirement, must be met. In year one, students must also take a seminar course (one in each term) and do three laboratory rotations. Prior to registering for a second year of study, students must successfully complete PATH 660, The Responsible Conduct of Research. In their fourth year of study, all students must successfully complete B&BS 503b, RCR Refresher for Senior BBS Students.

Honors requirement Students must meet the Graduate School’s Honors requirement by the end of the fourth term of full-time study. Students must also maintain an overall High Pass average. Student progress toward these goals is reviewed at the end of the second term.

Qualifying examination The qualifying examination of the Experimental Pathology graduate program comprises: (1) enrollment in the BBS/Pathology course Developing and Writing a Scientific Research Proposal in the fall term of year two and preparation of a proposal on the topic of the student’s research; student will receive assistance from a faculty member who will later be part of the qualifying committee; (2) two literature reading periods in the spring term of year two that are specifically related to the grant proposal; and (3) an oral exam in which the student is examined by the qualifying exam committee on the research proposal, the reading periods, and general knowledge of experimental pathology. This exam is usually taken in the second term of the second year and is described below.

  • 1. The qualifying examination committee, consisting of three faculty members, will be chosen to examine the student. At least one of the committee members must have a primary appointment in the Department of Pathology, and the thesis adviser is not on the exam committee. The student will read with two committee members. The faculty member who assisted the student during the proposal writing period will serve as the third person on the committee. At the oral exam itself, one member of the committee will be selected as the chairperson responsible for documenting the results of the exam for submission to the DGS. Members of the exam committee should have expertise in areas chosen for reading.
  • 2. All oral exams will follow the same general format. The oral examination will focus on the student’s ability to present and defend the research proposal. The student should come to the exam with a short (30–40 minute) presentation of the thesis-related proposal, with visual aids. The actual presentation will take longer since exam committee faculty will interrupt with questions. The committee can also ask questions on topics covered during the reading period and general topics in experimental pathology that will have been covered in courses. The final evaluation by the exam committee faculty takes into account the student’s performance on the examination and performance in lab (based on the adviser’s evaluation, solicited by the DGS). A written summary of the qualifying examination evaluation will be prepared by the examination committee chairperson and submitted to the DGS. If the student does not pass the exam, the committee has the option of recommending an additional course of reading and/or written work. The DGS has final discretion in approving or modifying the recommendations of the committee.

Prospectus Upon successful completion of the qualifying examination, the student will constitute a dissertation committee including at minimum three members in addition to the dissertation/thesis adviser. At least two of the committee members must be Pathology department faculty. The membership of the committee must be approved by the DGS. The student will prepare a written thesis prospectus, consisting of a summary of background information in the field of interest, the specific questions to be answered, a rationale for choosing those questions, and a research plan for addressing those questions. Upon completing the course requirement with at least two terms of Honors, passing the qualifying examination, and submitting a thesis prospectus, students will be admitted to candidacy. This should take place by the end of the third year, and preferably in the second year. Students must then submit a written thesis describing the research and present a thesis research seminar.

Additional requirements There is no foreign language requirement. In accordance with the BBS program, Ph.D. students are expected to participate in two terms (or the equivalent) of teaching. Students are not expected to teach during their first year. Teaching assignments in fulfillment of the requirement must be approved in advance by the DGS.

M.D./Ph.D. Students

M.D./Ph.D. students must satisfy the requirements listed above for the Ph.D. with the following modifications: Two laboratory rotations are required. Assisting in teaching of one course is required. Four courses are required for the Ph.D., including PATH 650b, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer, and PATH 690a, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease. In addition, students are required to register for School of Medicine courses in OCS (Online Course Selection), https://students.yale.edu/ocs.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations. Awarded only to students who are continuing for the Ph.D. Students are not admitted for this degree.

M.S. Students are not admitted for this degree. On a case-by-case basis and subject to faculty vote, students who are not continuing for the Ph.D. may be considered for this degree if they have successfully completed the course requirements for the Ph.D. degree (three laboratory rotations, PATH 650b, PATH 660, PATH 690a, three elective courses, and two seminar courses), and received a grade of Honors in at least one core course (i.e., excluding rotations and seminar courses). Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.S.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Experimental Pathology, Yale University, PO Box 208023, New Haven CT 06520-8023; Web site, http://medicine.yale.edu/pathology/education/graduateprogram.

Courses

PATH 620a and b, Laboratory Rotations in Experimental Pathology  Themis Kyriakides

Laboratory rotations for first-year graduate students.

PATH 630b/ENAS 535bU, Biomaterial-Tissue Interactions Themis Kyriakides

The course addresses the interactions between tissues and biomaterials, with an emphasis on the importance of molecular- and cellular-level events in dictating the performance and longevity of clinically relevant devices. In addition, specific areas such as biomaterials for tissue engineering and the importance of stem/progenitor cells, and biomaterial-mediated gene and drug delivery are addressed. TTH 9–10:15

PATH 640a/B&BS 640a, Developing and Writing a Scientific Research Proposal  Katerina Politi, Nicole Calabro

The course covers the intricacies of scientific writing and guides students in the development of a scientific research proposal on the topic of their research. All elements of an NIH fellowship application are covered, and eligible students submit their applications for funding. Enrollment limited to fifteen. T 2–4

PATH 650b, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer David Stern, Qin Yan

A comprehensive survey of cancer research from the cellular to the clinical level. The relation of cancer to intracellular and intercellular regulation of cell proliferation is emphasized, as are animal models for cancer research. Background in molecular genetics and cell biology is assumed. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the organizers. MWF 1–2

PATH 660/C&MP 650/PHAR 580, The Responsible Conduct of Research  Barbara Ehrlich, Demetrios Braddock

Organized to foster discussion, the course is taught by faculty in the Pharmacology, Pathology, and Physiology departments and two or three senior graduate students. Each session is based on case studies from primary literature, reviews, and two texts: Francis Macrina’s Scientific Integrity and Kathy Barker’s At the Bench. Each week, students are required to submit a reaction paper discussing the reading assignment. Students take turns leading the class discussion; a final short paper on a hot topic in bioethics is required. TH 11–12:15

PATH 670b, Biological Mechanisms of Reaction to Injury S. David Hudnall, Joanna Gibson, Gilbert Moeckel, Jon Morrow, Jeffrey Sklar

An introduction to human biology and disease as a manifestation of reaction to injury. Topics include organ structure and function, cell injury, circulatory and inflammatory responses, disordered physiology, and neoplasia. TTH 11:35–12:50

PATH 680a/C&MP 630a/PHAR 502a, Seminar in Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology Don Nguyen, Titus Boggon, Susumu Tomita

Readings and discussion on a diverse range of current topics in molecular medicine, pharmacology, and physiology. The class emphasizes analysis of primary research literature and development of presentation and writing skills. Contemporary articles are assigned on a related topic every week, and a student leads discussions with input from faculty who are experts in the topic area. The overall goal is to cover a specific topic of medical relevance (e.g., cancer, neurodegeneration) from the perspective of three primary disciplines (i.e., physiology: normal function; pathology: abnormal function; and pharmacology: intervention).

PATH 681a/B&BS 681a, Advanced Topics in Cancer Biology Qin Yan

This advanced course focuses on readings and discussion on three or four major topics in cancer biology, such as targeted therapy, tumor immunology, tumor metabolism, and genomic evolution of cancer. For each topic, the class starts with an interactive lecture, followed by critical analysis of primary research literature. Recent research articles are assigned, and a student leads discussions with input from faculty who are experts in the topic area. Prerequisite: PATH 650b or permission of the instructor. Open to all Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D., and M.P.H. students and to advanced undergraduates at the discretion of the instructor. F 2–4

PATH 690a, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Narendra Wajapeyee

This course covers aspects of the fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying various human diseases. Many of the disorders discussed represent major forms of infectious, degenerative, vascular, neoplastic, and inflammatory disease. Additionally, certain rarer diseases that illustrate good models for investigation and/or application of basic biologic principles are covered in the course. The objective is to highlight advances in experimental and molecular medicine as they relate to understanding the pathogenesis of disease and the formulation of therapies. TTH 2–3:30

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Film and Media Studies

53 Wall Street, Rm. 216, 203.436.4668

http://filmstudies.yale.edu

M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Francesco Casetti (on leave [Sp])

Acting Chair [Sp]

To be announced

Director of Graduate Studies

Dudley Andrew (53 Wall St., Rm. 219, dudley.andrew@yale.edu)

Professors Dudley Andrew, Francesco Casetti (on leave [Sp]), Katerina Clark, Aaron Gerow, John MacKay (on leave [F]), Millicent Marcus, Charles Musser, Brigitte Peucker, Katie Trumpener (on leave [F]), Laura Wexler

Associate Professor R. John Williams

Senior Lecturer Ronald Gregg (on leave [Sp])

Fields of Study

Film and Media Studies is an interdisciplinary field drawing on the study of the history of art, national cultures and literatures, literary theory, philosophy, anthropology, feminist and queer studies, race and representation, and other areas. To study film and media at Yale, every doctoral student must be accepted into a combined program involving another discipline. Film and Media Studies offers a combined Ph.D. with African American Studies, American Studies, Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Literatures, English, French, German, History of Art, Italian, and Slavic Languages and Literatures. In addition to acquiring a firm grounding in the methods and core material of both film-media studies and another discipline, the candidate is advised to coordinate a plan of study involving comprehensive knowledge of one or more areas of specialization. Such areas include:

  • 1. Historiography, including archival history, history of technology, silent film.
  • 2. Aesthetics: theories of the image, adaptation, film/philosophy, avant-garde film.
  • 3. European film: British-Irish, French, German and Nordic, Italian, Slavic.
  • 4. American culture: Hollywood, independent film, African American cinema.
  • 5. World film: global image exchange; cinema in Asia, Latin America, and Africa.
  • 6. Documentary as an aesthetic, cultural, and ideological practice.
  • 7. Cinema in its relations with other arts and other media.
  • 8. Screen cultures, screened images, post-cinema, theory and history of media.

Through course work, examinations, and the dissertation, the candidate links a film and media specialty with material and methods coming from the participating discipline. Directors of graduate studies from both programs monitor the candidate’s plans and progress.

Special Admissions Requirements

Combined-program applicants should familiarize themselves fully not only with the Film and Media Studies entrance requirements but with those of the other graduate program as well. Since combined-program applicants must be admitted both by Film and Media Studies and by the other department, candidates should make sure that the material they submit with the application clearly addresses the requirements and mission of both graduate programs.

The application for Film and Media Studies is administered by the Office of Graduate Admissions. All applications are to be completed online and can be accessed by visiting its Web site at http://gsas.yale.edu/admission-graduate-school. In the “Programs of Study” section of the application, the applicant should do the following: choose Film and Media Studies in Step 1 and the combined department in Step 3. All applications including writing samples are read by the admissions committees in both units.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Every student selected for the combined program is subject to the supervision of the Film and Media Studies program and the relevant participating department. A written protocol between each department and Film and Media Studies outlines the requirements and schedule to be borne in mind as a plan of study is worked out in consultation with the director of graduate studies of Film and Media Studies and the director of graduate studies of the participating department. In all cases, students are required to take two core seminars in Film and Media Studies (FILM 601 and FILM 603) as well as at least four additional Film and Media Studies seminars. Course requirements vary for participating departments. By October 1 of the third year, all students must have fulfilled an assignment related to foundational texts and films. Later that year, students advance to candidacy by completing qualifying examinations and a dissertation prospectus.

  • 1. Qualifying examinations follow the regulations of the participating department with at least one member of the Film and Media Studies Executive Committee participating.
  • 2. The dissertation prospectus is presented to a faculty committee or the entire faculty of the participating department. The prospectus is also circulated to the entire Film and Media Studies Executive Committee for their information and ratification.
  • 3. A defense of method occurs when the dissertation is nearing completion, one or two terms before submission. The purpose of this defense is to provide guidance and feedback at a critical stage, in order to assist the dissertation’s final form. At least three faculty readers meet with the student; the DGS of Film and Media Studies and the DGS of the participating department are also invited to participate. At least one examiner of the dissertation must be a member of the Film and Media Studies Executive Committee and one must be from the participating department.

The faculty in Film and Media Studies considers participation in the Teaching Fellows Program to be essential to the professional preparation of graduate students. Students normally teach in years three and four. Every student may expect to assist in two Film and Media Studies courses, one of which will almost certainly be Introduction to Film.

Master’s Degree

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

Courses

FILM 603a/AMST 814a, Historical Methods in Film Study Charles Musser

A range of historiographic issues in film studies, including the roles of technology, exhibition, and spectatorship. Topics include intermediality and intertextuality. Consideration of a range of methodological approaches through a focus on international early cinema and American race cinema of the silent period. Particular attention to the interaction between scholars and archives. T 3:20–6:20

FILM 609a/CPLT 521a, Issues in World Literature and Cinema Dudley Andrew

Can there be disciplinary areas named “World Literature” and “World Cinema,” or does the adjective “world” defy perimeters? What about competing adjectives like international, transnational, global, planetary, etc.? Undergraduate courses and textbooks with “world” in their titles have proliferated this century, but what are they aiming to define, organize, and explore? What topics, principles, methods, and conundrums do they address? This seminar aims to quickly survey the history of the “world quest” of literary studies from Goethe to Moretti, and to see if the more recent shift from International to World Cinema marks a parallel quest or something entirely different. Students debate positions taken by literary scholars (Damrosch, Casanova, Spivak, Prendergast, et al.) and by a phalanx of film scholars. We investigate infrastructure (festivals, translation, subtitles, prizes) via the kind of collaborative effort often required by the scale of this “area.” Meanwhile each student develops an essay on one problem lurking today in literary or film history as these fields are pushed to their geographical limit. Questions could concern corpus, system, distribution, influence, translation, mediation, genre, etc. W 9:25–11:15

FILM 624b/CPLT 930b/ITAL 785b/JDST 843b, The Holocaust in Italian Literature and Film Millicent Marcus

Though Italy was among the Nazi-occupied countries with the highest survival rate of its Jewish population, the Holocaust has continued to haunt the Italian literary and cinematic imagination in ways that warrant close critical scrutiny. The aesthetic and moral problem of how to represent this event in art gains special urgency in the Italian context, where a realist tradition dating back to Dante and Giotto joins forces with a postwar neorealist impulse to create a series of compelling literary treatments (Primo Levi’s above all), as well as cinematic works. In keeping with the Holocaust’s invitation to interdisciplinary study, the course examines the intersection of a number of discourses—historical, literary, cinematic—viewed from a variety of perspectives—feminist, generic, philosophical, theological, and historiographic. Since several of the authors are women, the question of the “voce femminile” and its creation of an alternative, or anti-history, is also raised. W 3:30–5:20, screenings M 7:30

FILM 705aU, Film History and Theory of Animation Aaron Gerow

A survey of the history and theory of animation. Examples from around the world, from various traditions, and from different periods. MW 2:30–3:45, screenings M 7–9

FILM 733bU/AMST 834bU, Documentary and the Environment Charles Musser

The environmental documentary has emerged as one of cinema’s most vital genres of the past ten years (in documentary, its only rivals are probably those concerned with the Second Gulf War). As the world’s environment faces a growing crisis, documentary has come to serve as a key means to draw public attention to specific issues. This course combines screenings with readings on documentary such as Bill Nichols’s important book Representing Reality. Often films have book tie-ins, and we consider how they complement each other and work together to maximize the impact of their message. Readings also focus on news items, debates, Web sites, and other media forms that are employed in conjunction with the films. T 1:30–3:20, screenings M 7

FILM 735aU/736bU/AMST 832aU/833bU, Documentary Film Workshop  Charles Musser

This workshop in audiovisual scholarship explores ways to present research through the moving image. Students work within a Public Humanities framework to make a documentary that draws on their disciplinary fields of study. Designed to fulfill requirements for the M.A. with a concentration in Public Humanities. W 12:30–3:20, screenings W 7–9

FILM 739a, The World of Screens Francesco Casetti, Bernard Georghegan

There is an astonishing explosion of screens around us: they proliferate in number, expand in size, find new locations in public or domestic spaces, abandon their usual quadrangular shape, lie horizontally instead of standing vertically, need to be touched instead of simply watched, connect devices instead of being isolated. There is something “excessive” in such an explosion. Yet screens are not an absolute novelty. This excessiveness is rooted in the past: in the imagination of new optical machines, developed by nineteenth-century literature and science; in the work of painters on surface and frame; in cinema’s evolution toward bigger and more inclusive screens; in the evolution of early television sets; etc. To retrace the roots of the current explosion allows us to understand better what a screen is, and why it is becoming the most typical object of our time. T 9:25–11:15

FILM 760bU/CPLT 905bU/GMAN 760bU, Intermediality in Film Brigitte Peucker

Film is a hybrid medium, the meeting point of several others. This course focuses on the relationship of film to theater and painting, suggesting that where two media are in evidence, there is usually a third. Topics include space, motion, color, theatricality, tableau vivant, ekphrasis, spectatorship, and new media. Readings feature art historical and film theoretical texts as well as essays pertinent to specific films. Films by Fassbinder, Bergman, Murnau, von Trier, Rohmer, Godard, Kiarostami, and others, concluding with three films by Peter Greenaway. T 3:30–5:20

FILM 775a/RUSS 696a, Post-Stalin Literature and Film Katerina Clark

The main developments in Russian and Soviet literature and film from Stalin’s death in 1953 to the present. W 1:30–3:20

FILM 804a/DRAM 406a/MUSI 837a, Opera, Media, Technology Gundula Kreuzer

To what extent does Wagner prefigure, as Friedrich Kittler has argued, modern “media technologies”? And what are the implications of opera’s increasing mediatization? In search of answers, this seminar explores opera from the perspectives of media archaeology and other recent approaches in opera, media, and science and technology studies. Topics include the roles of architecture and stage technologies from Renaissance spectacle to twenty-first-century “mobile opera”; Wagner’s theory of the Gesamtkunstwerk; immersion, illusion, and the cinematic; the orchestra as sound technology; and nineteenth-century attempts at “recording” productions. From there we turn to recent hybridizations in the form of onstage video and HD broadcasts, as well as alternative conceptions of opera. Does technology offer a saving grace for opera in the digital age?

FILM 873bU/EALL 581bU, Japanese Cinema and Its Others Aaron Gerow

A critical inquiry into the myth of a homogeneous Japan through analyzing how Japanese film and media historically represent “others” of different races, ethnicities, nationalities, genders, and sexualities, including blacks, ethnic Koreans, Okinawans, Ainu, undocumented immigrants, LGBT minorities, the disabled, youth, and “monstrous” others like ghosts. TTH 11:35–12:50, screenings W 6:30

FILM 880a/EALL 872a, Theories of Popular Culture in Japan: Television  Aaron Gerow

Exploration of postwar theories of popular culture and subculture in Japan, particularly focusing on the intellectual debates over television and new media. M 1:30–3:20, screenings HTBA

FILM 900, Directed Reading

FILM 901, Individual Research

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Forestry & Environmental Studies

Kroon Hall, 203.432.5100

http://environment.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Dean

To be announced

Director of Doctoral Studies

Karen Seto (380 Edwards St., Rm. 102, 203.432.9784, karen.seto@yale.edu)

Professors Mark Ashton, Michelle Bell, Gaboury Benoit, Graeme Berlyn, Benjamin Cashore, Michael Dove, Daniel Esty, Timothy Gregoire, Edgar Hertwich, Matthew Kotchen, Xuhui Lee, Robert Mendelsohn, Chadwick Oliver, Peter Raymond, James Saiers, Oswald Schmitz, Karen Seto, David Skelly, John Wargo, Julie Zimmerman

Associate Professors Mark Bradford, Marian Chertow

Assistant Professors Craig Brodersen, Liza Comita, Justin Farrell, Alexander Felson, Eli Fenichel, Kenneth Gillingham, Nadine Unger

Fields of Study

Fields include agroforestry; biodiversity conservation; biostatistics and biometry; climate science; community ecology; ecosystems ecology; ecosystems management; environmental anthropology; environmental biophysics and meteorology; environmental chemistry; environmental ethics; environmental governance; environmental health risk assessment; environmental history; environmental law and politics; environmental and resource policy; forest ecology; hydrology; industrial ecology; industrial environmental management; plant physiology and anatomy; pollution management; population ecology; resource economics; energy and the environment, silviculture, social ecology; stand development, tropical ecology and conservation; urban planning; water resource management; environmental management and social ecology in developing countries; urban ecology.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants should hold a bachelor’s or master’s degree in a field related to natural resources, such as forestry, or in a relevant discipline of the natural or social sciences, such as biology, chemistry, economics, or mathematics. The GRE General Test is required but Subject Tests are optional.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students are required to take Doctoral Student Seminar and Responsible Conduct of Research (F&ES 900a) in the first year of their program. Aside from this requirement, there is no required curriculum of credit courses and no formal language requirement. Courses of study are individually designated through consultation between degree candidates and their advisers and dissertation committees. The amount of course work required will depend on the previous training of the student, but the normal requirement for a student with no previous graduate training is three or four courses per term for four terms. The program of each student will be evaluated at the end of the first year of residence. At least two term grades of Honors are required in the first two years of study; however, it is anticipated that grades of Honors or High Pass will be achieved in two-thirds of all courses taken. A written and oral qualifying examination is required upon completion of the course requirements. Students are expected to take the examination by the end of their second year, although this can be extended to the third year in cases with appropriate extenuating circumstances. At the time of the qualifying examination, the student must present a prospectus of the research work proposed for the dissertation. Successful completion of the qualifying examination and submission of the prospectus will result in admission to candidacy. Upon completion of the dissertation, the candidate must make unbound copies of the dissertation available to the faculty and appear for an oral examination at a time and place designated by the director of doctoral studies. Copies of the approved dissertation must be submitted to the Graduate School. Depending upon the nature of the dissertation topic, completion of the Ph.D. degree normally requires four years.

Teaching and research experiences are regarded as integral parts of the graduate training program in Forestry & Environmental Studies. All students are required to serve as teaching fellows (10 hours per week) for four terms. The nature of the teaching assignment is determined in cooperation with the student’s major adviser and the director of doctoral studies. With the permission of the director of doctoral studies, the total teaching requirement may be reduced for students who are awarded fellowships supported by outside funding. Regardless of outside funding, all doctoral students must serve as teaching fellows for a minimum of two terms.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students may petition for this degree after they have passed the qualifying exam and advanced to candidacy. Applications for this master’s degree are not accepted.

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) This degree is normally granted only to students who are withdrawing from the Ph.D. program. Applications for this master’s degree are not accepted. Requirements that must be met for award of the M.S. are (1) successful completion of two years of course work in residence with two grades of Honors; (2) a written prospectus; (3) fulfillment of one term of the teaching requirement. Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.S.

For information on the terminal master’s degrees offered by the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (the Master of Forestry, Master of Forest Science, Master of Environmental Management, and Master of Environmental Science degrees), visit the School’s Web site, www.yale.edu/environment, or contact Admissions Director, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven CT 06511.

Courses

For course descriptions, see the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies bulletin, available online in both html and pdf versions at www.yale.edu/bulletin.

Foundations
  • [F&ES 500aU, Landscape Ecology]
  • F&ES 505a, Economics of the Environment
  • F&ES 510a, Introduction to Statistics in the Environmental Sciences
  • F&ES 510Ea, Introduction to Statistics in the Environmental Sciences
  • F&ES 515a, Physical Sciences for Environmental Management
  • F&ES 520a/ANTH 581a, Society and Environment: Introduction to Theory and Method
  • F&ES 525a, The Politics and Practice of Environmental and Resource Policy
  • F&ES 530a, Ecosystems and Landscapes
Professional Skills Courses
  • F&ES 576b, PSC: Collaboration and Conflict Resolution Skills for Environmental Professionals
  • F&ES 577b, PSC: Environmental Communicator
  • F&ES 578b, PSC: Financial Concepts for Environmental Managers
Integrative Frameworks
  • F&ES 610a, Science to Solutions
  • [F&ES 620a, Integrative Assessment]
Capstone
  • F&ES 950b, Life Cycle Assessment Practicum
  • F&ES 953a,b, Business and the Environment Consulting Clinic
  • F&ES 954a, Management Plans for Protected Areas
  • F&ES 955a,b, Seminar in Research Analysis and Communication in Forest Ecology
  • F&ES 961a,b, Entrepreneurial Venture Creation
  • F&ES 964b, Large-Scale Conservation: Integrating Science, Management, and Policy
  • F&ES 965b/ANTH 598b, Advanced Readings: Social Science of Conservation and Development
  • F&ES 966a, The Entrepreneurial Approach to Environmental Problem Solving
  • [F&ES 969b, Rapid Assessments in Forest Conservation]
  • F&ES 970a,b/LAW 30164, Environmental Protection Clinic
  • F&ES 971b, Land Use Clinic
  • F&ES 972a,b/LAW 30165, Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic
  • [F&ES 976b, Cities in Hot Water: Urban Climate Mitigation and Adaptation]
  • F&ES 977a, Creating Science Narratives for Solutions
  • F&ES 978b, Creating Science Networks for Solutions
Ecology
Community and Ecosystem Ecology
  • [F&ES 681a, Ethnobotany]
  • F&ES 717b, Tropical Field Ecology
  • F&ES 723a, Wetlands Ecology, Conservation, and Management
  • F&ES 731b, Tropical Field Botany
  • [F&ES 733b, Synthesizing Environmental Science for Policy]
  • F&ES 734b, Biological Oceanography
  • F&ES 741b, Introduction to Indigenous Silviculture
  • [F&ES 752a, Ecology and Conservation of Tropical Forests]
  • [F&ES 768a, Pests, Pathogens, and Parasites in Natural and Managed Systems]
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • [F&ES 736b, Ecology Seminar]
  • [F&ES 738aU, Aquatic Ecology]
  • [F&ES 739b, Species and Ecosystem Conservation: An Integrated, Interdisciplinary Approach]
  • [F&ES 740b, Dynamics of Ecological Systems]
  • [F&ES 744b, Conservation Science]
Environmental Education and Communication
  • F&ES 742b, Fundamentals of Working with People
  • [F&ES 745a, Environmental Writing]
  • F&ES 746b, Archetypes and the Environment
  • F&ES 747a, Global Communication Skills
  • F&ES 750a, Writing the World
  • F&ES 900a, Doctoral Student Seminar and Responsible Conduct of Research
Forestry
Forest Biology
  • F&ES 650b, Fire: Science and Policy
  • [F&ES 652b, Wood: Structure and Function]
  • F&ES 654a/MCDB 660a, Anatomy, Physiology, and Development of Trees and Other Vascular Plants
  • [F&ES 655b, Research Methods of the Anatomy and Physiology of Trees]
  • F&ES 656b, Tree Physiology and Ecophysiology
  • [F&ES 671a, Natural History and Taxonomy of Trees]
  • [F&ES 674b, Seminar in Forest Health]
  • F&ES 682a, Multifunctional Carbon-Sequestering Agroforestry
  • [F&ES 691a, Trees: Environmental Biology]
Forest Management
  • F&ES 657b, Managing Resources
  • [F&ES 658a, Global Resources, International Resource Exchanges, and the Environment]
  • F&ES 659b, Principles in Applied Ecology: The Practice of Silviculture
  • F&ES 660a, Forest Dynamics: Growth and Development of Forest Stands
  • [F&ES 661b, Analysis and Development of Silvicultural Prescriptions]
  • F&ES 668b, Field Trips in Forest Resource Management and Silviculture
  • F&ES 669b, Forest Management Operations
  • F&ES 670b, Southern Forest and Forestry Field Trip
  • F&ES 675b, Growth and Yield
  • F&ES 680a, Forest and Ecosystem Finance
  • F&ES 683b, Seminar in Tropical Forest Restoration in Human-Dominated Landscapes
Physical Sciences
Atmospheric Sciences
  • F&ES 700b, Alpine, Arctic, and Boreal Ecosystems Seminar
  • [F&ES 701b, Climate Change Policy and Science Seminar]
  • [F&ES 702b, Climate Change Seminar]
  • [F&ES 703b, Climate and Society]
  • [F&ES 704a, Workshop on Remote Sensing with Drones]
  • [F&ES 705b, Climate and Air Pollution]
  • [F&ES 722a, Boundary Layer Meteorology]
  • [F&ES 771a, Climate Modeling]
Environmental Chemistry
  • F&ES 706aU, Organic Pollutants in the Environment
  • F&ES 707bU/ENAS 640b, Aquatic Chemistry
  • [F&ES 708a, Biogeochemistry and Pollution]
  • [F&ES 711aU, Atmospheric Chemistry]
  • F&ES 715b, Advanced Reading in Biogeochemistry
Soil Science
  • F&ES 709a, Soil Science
Water Resources
  • [F&ES 690a, Plant Hydraulics]
  • F&ES 710b, Coastal Governance
  • F&ES 712b, Water Resource Management
  • [F&ES 713a, Coastal Ecosystems]
  • [F&ES 714bU/ENAS 646b, Environmental Hydrology]
  • [F&ES 719a, River Processes and Restoration]
  • [F&ES 724b, Watershed Cycles and Processes]
  • F&ES 729b, Caribbean Coastal Development: Cesium and CZM
Quantitative and Research Methods
  • F&ES 550a, Natural Science Research Methods
  • F&ES 551a, Qualitative Social Science Research
  • F&ES 552b, Master’s Student Research Colloquium
  • F&ES 638b, Carbon Footprints—Modeling and Analysis
  • F&ES 720a, Introduction to R
  • [F&ES 725b, Remote Sensing of Land Cover and Land Use Change]
  • F&ES 726b/ARCG 762bU/EMD 548b/G&G 562bU, Observing Earth from Space
  • [F&ES 751b, Sampling Methodology and Practice]
  • F&ES 753a, Regression Modeling of Ecological and Environmental Data
  • F&ES 754a, Geospatial Software Design
  • F&ES 755b, Modeling Geographic Space
  • F&ES 756a, Modeling Geographic Objects
  • [F&ES 757b, Statistical Design of Experiments]
  • F&ES 758b, Multivariate Statistical Analysis in the Environmental Sciences
  • F&ES 762a, Foundations for Measuring and Modeling Environmental and Socio-environmental Systems: Applied Math for Environmental Studies
  • [F&ES 780b, Seminar in Forest Inventory]
  • F&ES 781b/STAT 674b, Applied Spatial Statistics
  • F&ES 794b, Confronting Models with Data
Social Sciences
Economics
  • F&ES 795b, Nature as Capital: Merging Ecological and Economic Models
  • F&ES 802b, Valuing the Environment
  • F&ES 803b, Green Markets: Voluntary and Information Approaches to Environmental Management
  • F&ES 804b, Economics of Natural Resource Management
  • F&ES 805a,b, Seminar in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
  • [F&ES 904a, Doctoral Seminar in Environmental Economics]
  • F&ES 905b, Doctoral Seminar in Environmental and Energy Economics
Energy and the Environment
  • F&ES 617a/AMST 744a/HIST 744a/HSHM 747a, Readings and Research in Energy History
  • F&ES 635b, Renewable Energy Project Finance
  • [F&ES 716b, Renewable Energy]
  • F&ES 798Eb, China’s Energy and Environmental Sustainability Challenge
  • F&ES 800b, Energy Economics and Policy Analysis
  • [F&ES 812b, Energy’s Impact on Freshwater Resources]
  • F&ES 814a/MGT 563a, Energy Systems Analysis
  • F&ES 816b, Electric Utilities: An Industry in Transition
  • [F&ES 818a/MGT 561a, Energy Technology Innovation]
  • F&ES 847a/LAW 20620, Decarbonizing the U.S. Power Sector: Driving U.S. Climate Policy under the Clean Air Act
Environmental Policy
  • [F&ES 718a, IPCC AR5 Assessment: The Physical Science Basis]
  • [F&ES 759b/MGT 697b/PLSC 727bU, Capitalism: Success, Crisis, and Reform]
  • F&ES 799a, Sustainable Development Goals and Implementation
  • F&ES 807a/LAW 20490/MGT 688a, Corporate Environmental Management and Strategy
  • F&ES 808b/LAW 21107/REL 926b, Law, Environment, and Religion: A Communion of Subjects
  • [F&ES 815a, The New Corporate Social Responsibility: Public Problems, Private Solutions, and Strategic Responses]
  • F&ES 817a, Urban, Suburban, and Regional Planning Practice
  • F&ES 819b, Strategies for Land Conservation
  • F&ES 820b, Land Use Law and Environmental Planning
  • F&ES 821b, Private Investment and the Environment: Legal Foundations and Tools
  • F&ES 824b/LAW 21033, Environmental Law and Policy
  • [F&ES 825a, International Environmental Law]
  • F&ES 826a, Foundations of Natural Resource Policy and Management
  • F&ES 828b, Comparative Environmental Law in Global Legal Systems
  • [F&ES 829bU, International Environmental Policy and Governance]
  • F&ES 835a, Seminar on Land Use Planning
  • F&ES 835Ea,b, Seminar on Land Use Planning
  • F&ES 837b, Seminar on Leadership in Natural Resources and the Environment
  • [F&ES 840b/LAW 21754, Climate Change and Clean Energy]
  • [F&ES 843b, Readings in Environmental History]
  • F&ES 845b/LAW 21508, Law and Globalization
  • F&ES 849b, Natural Resource Policy Practicum
  • [F&ES 850b, International Organizations and Conferences]
  • F&ES 851b, Environmental Diplomacy Practicum
  • [F&ES 855a, Climate Change Mitigation in Urban Areas]
  • F&ES 860b, Learning to Lead from Leaders: Creating Change in Policies and Company Practices
  • F&ES 862b/HPM 601b/LAW 21141/PSYC 601b, The Science of Science Communication
  • [F&ES 866b/LAW 21566, The Law of Climate Change]
  • F&ES 874a/MGT 862a, Introduction to Responsible Business: Oil and Wine
  • F&ES 875Ea/MGMT 955a, Urban Resilience: Complexity, Collaborative Structures, and Leadership Challenges
Social and Political Ecology
  • F&ES 628b, Understanding and Building Resistance in Developing Countries
  • F&ES 645b, Global Public Goods and Cooperation in International Politics
  • F&ES 738Eb, Himalayan Diversities: Environment, Livelihood, and Culture
  • F&ES 760b, Conservation in Practice: An International Perspective
  • [F&ES 763b, Translating the Science of Wildlife Conservation into Practice]
  • [F&ES 764a, The American West as an Environmental, Cultural, and Political Case Study]
  • F&ES 767b, Building a Conservation Toolkit: From Project Design to Evaluation
  • F&ES 769a/REL 969a, Christianity and Ecology
  • F&ES 772a, Social Justice in the Sustainable Food System
  • [F&ES 774a/NELC 774aU, Agriculture: Origins, Evolution, Crises]
  • [F&ES 783b, Field Course in Culture, Environmental Politics, and Social Change]
  • F&ES 783Ea,b, Introduction to Religions and Ecology
  • [F&ES 784Ea, Western Religions and Ecology]
  • F&ES 785Eb, East Asian Religions and Ecology
  • F&ES 786Ea/REL 918Ha, Native American Religion and Ecology
  • [F&ES 787E/REL 911H, Thomas Berry: Life and Thought]
  • [F&ES 789E/REL 912H, Journey of the Universe]
  • F&ES 792Eb/REL 928Hb, South Asian Religions and Ecology
  • F&ES 793b/ANTH 773bU/ARCG 773bU/NELC 588bU, Abrupt Climate Change and Societal Collapse
  • F&ES 797b/REL 906b, Christianity and Environmental Ethics
  • F&ES 831b, Society and Natural Resources
  • F&ES 836a/ANTH 541a/HIST 965a/PLSC 779a, Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development
  • F&ES 839a/ANTH 597a, Social Science of Conservation and Development
  • F&ES 846b, Perspectives on Environmental Injustices
  • F&ES 854b, Institutions and the Environment
  • [F&ES 857b, Urbanization, Global Change, and Sustainability]
  • F&ES 869b/ANTH 572b, Disaster, Degradation, Dystopia: Social Science Approaches to Environmental Perturbation and Change
  • F&ES 877b/ANTH 561b, Anthropology of the Global Economy for Development and Conservation
  • F&ES 878a, Climate and Society
  • [F&ES 882a, The Black Box of Implementation: Households, Communities, Gender]
  • F&ES 892a/ARCH 4021a, Introduction to Planning and Development
Health and Environment
  • F&ES 727a, The Future of Food
  • F&ES 736Eb, Environmental Ethics
  • F&ES 765b, Technological and Social Innovation in Global Food Systems
  • F&ES 893b/EHS 511b, Principles of Risk Assessment
  • F&ES 896b/EHS 503b, Public Health Toxicology
  • [F&ES 897b/EHS 508b, Assessing Exposures to Environmental Stressors]
  • [F&ES 898a/EHS 585a, The Environment and Human Health]
  • [F&ES 899b, Sustainable Development in Post-Disaster Context: Haiti]
Industrial Ecology, Environmental Planning, and Technology
  • F&ES 782a/ARCH 4216a, Globalization Space: International Infrastructure and Extrastatecraft
  • F&ES 788b, Applied Urban Ecology
  • F&ES 872bU, Introduction to Green Chemistry
  • [F&ES 881a, FT: Field Experience in Industrial Operations]
  • F&ES 884a/ENAS 645a, Industrial Ecology
  • F&ES 885b/ENAS 660bU, Green Engineering and Sustainability
  • [F&ES 888a/ARCH 4226a, Ecological Urban Design]
  • F&ES 894a, Green Building: Issues and Perspectives
  • F&ES 895a, Green Building Intensive: How Buildings Work

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French

82-90 Wall Street, 3d floor, 203.432.4900

http://french.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Maurice Samuels

Director of Graduate Studies

Christopher Miller [F] (82-90 Wall St., Rm. 325, 203.432.4466)

R. Howard Bloch [Sp] (53 Wall St., Rm. 212, 203.432.4912)

Professors R. Howard Bloch, Ardis Butterfield (English), Carolyn Dean (History; on leave), Edwin Duval, Marie-Hélène Girard (Visiting), Alice Kaplan, Christopher Miller (on leave [Sp]), Pierre Saint-Amand, Maurice Samuels

Assistant Professors Morgane Cadieu, Thomas Connolly, Jill Jarvis, Christopher Semk

Affiliated Faculty Dudley Andrew (Film & Media Studies), Carol Armstrong (History of Art), John Merriman (History)

Fields of Study

Fields include French literature, criticism, theory, and culture from the early Middle Ages to the present, and the French-language literatures of Africa, the Caribbean, and the Maghreb.

Special Admissions Requirements

A thorough command of French is expected, as well as a good preparation in all fields of French literature. Applicants should submit a twenty-page writing sample in French. This can consist of one twenty-page paper or several shorter papers that total twenty pages.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

(1) Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in two languages (in addition to English and French). Proficiency is defined as the successful completion of one year of study at the college level or reading proficiency at the graduate level. Students must fulfill one language requirement no later than the beginning of their third term of study. The second language requirement must be satisfied before the prospectus can be approved. (2) During the first two years of study, students normally take sixteen term courses. These must include Old French and at least two graduate-level term courses outside the department. They may include one term of an approved language course taken as a means of fulfilling one of the language requirements, and as many as four graduate-level term courses outside the department. A grade of Honors must be obtained in at least four of the sixteen courses, two or more of which must be in courses offered by the department. (3) A qualifying oral examination takes place during the sixth term. The examination is designed to demonstrate students’ mastery of the French language, their knowledge and command of selected topics in literature, and their capacity to present and discuss texts and issues. (4) After having successfully passed the qualifying oral examination, students are required to submit a dissertation prospectus for approval, normally no later than the end of the term following the oral examination.

In order to be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D., students must complete all predissertation requirements, including the prospectus. Students must be admitted to candidacy by the end of the seventh term.

Teaching is considered an integral part of the preparation for the Ph.D. degree, and all students are required to teach for at least one year. Opportunities to teach undergraduate courses normally become available to candidates in their third year, after consideration of the needs of the department and of the students’ capacity both to teach and to fulfill their final requirements. Prior to teaching, students take a language-teaching methodology course.

Combined Ph.D. Program

The French department also offers three combined Ph.D.s: one in French and African American Studies (in conjunction with the Department of African American Studies), one in French and Renaissance Studies (in conjunction with the Renaissance Studies Program), and one in French and Film and Media Studies (in conjunction with the Film and Media Studies Program). Students in all of these combined degree programs are subject to all the requirements for a Ph.D. in French, with exceptions noted below. In addition, they must fulfill certain requirements particular to the combined program.

The combined Ph.D. in French and African American Studies is most appropriate for students who intend to concentrate in and write a dissertation on the literature of the francophone Caribbean. Students take sixteen term courses, including Theorizing Racial Formations (AFAM 505a), which is a required course for all first-year graduate students in the combined program, and three other graduate-level African American Studies courses: (1) a history course, (2) a social science course, and (3) a course in African American literature or culture. Ten of the remaining twelve courses are devoted to the full spectrum of periods and fields in French and francophone literature and culture; the two remaining courses can be in any field. Students in the combined degree program should fulfill the French department’s language requirements by gaining proficiency in either a Creole language of the Caribbean or Spanish, as well as by demonstrating competence in a second foreign language that is directly relevant to the study of the Caribbean. The students’ oral examinations normally include two topics of African American content. The dissertation prospectus must be approved by the director of graduate studies both in the French department and in African American Studies, and final approval of the dissertation must come from both departments. For further details see African American Studies.

Students in the combined Ph.D. program in French and Renaissance Studies will take nine courses in French and seven in Renaissance Studies. Students must learn Latin and Italian. The oral examination will consist of seven topics: four in French and three in Renaissance Studies. Both the dissertation prospectus and the final dissertation must be approved by the French department and the program in Renaissance Studies. For further details see Renaissance Studies.

For students in the combined Ph.D. program in French and Film and Media Studies, the oral examination will normally include one topic on film theory and one on French film. Both the dissertation prospectus and the final dissertation must be approved by the French department and the program in Film and Media Studies. In addition, Film and Media Studies requires a dissertation defense. For further details see Film and Media Studies.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations. Additionally, students in French are eligible to pursue a supplemental M.Phil. degree in Medieval Studies. For further details, see Medieval Studies.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program may petition for the M.A. degree after a minimum of one year of study in residence, upon completion of one of the language requirements and eight courses, of which at least six are in French. Two grades of Honors in French graduate courses are required.

Program materials are available on the department’s Web site at http://french.yale.edu/academics/graduate-program.

Courses

FREN 802a/CPLT 582a/ENGL 545a, Medieval Translation Ardis Butterfield

Using modern postcolonial as well as medieval theories of translation, memory, and bilingualism we explore how texts are transformed, cited, and reinvented in the medieval period. What happens to language under the pressure of crosslingual reading practices? How can the freedom and inventiveness of medieval poetic practices illuminate modern theories of translation? Texts include material in French, English, Latin, and Italian. Proficiency in any one or more of these languages is welcome, but every effort will be made to use texts available in modern English translation, so as to include as wide a participation as possible in the course. W 9:25–11:15

FREN 828a, Les Années 30 du XVIème Siècle Edwin Duval

Focus on the literature of a watershed decade, in which we find the first expressions of a conscious break with the newly invented and disparagingly named Moyen Âge. Readings include the first printed works by three great writers of the new modern age that will eventually come to be called the Renaissance: François Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, and Clément Marot. Conducted in French. M 1:30–3:20

FREN 854b, Corneille et Racine Christopher Semk

Ever since La Bruyère pitted Corneille against Racine in Les Caractères—Corneille “paints men as they should be,” whereas Racine “paints them as they are”—it has become commonplace to place the two playwrights at opposing ends of classical tragedy. This course revisits the familiar Corneille-Racine parallel through close readings of the plays in their historical, political, and cultural context. We cover such topics as the poetics of classical tragedy, the (a)morality of the theater, the paradox of tragic pleasure, and the limits of representation (what can and cannot be shown, and how). In addition to tragedies by Corneille and Racine, primary readings include texts by Aristotle, Augustine, d’Aubignac, and Fontenelle. Secondary readings by Guénoun, Marin, Rancière. Conducted in French. T 1:30–3:20

FREN 861b, Margins of the Enlightenment Pierre Saint-Amand

This course proposes a critical examination of the French Enlightenment, with a focus on issues of progress, universalism, and race. We confront these notions with approaches that have emerged in the postcolonial field of studies as well as gender studies. Authors from the clandestine and underground philosophical milieu are also studied. We are assisted by contemporary historians and critics of the Enlightenment, principally Foucault, Hunt, and Darnton. Readings are in Mme de Graffigny, Mme de Duras, Boyer d’Argens, Mairobert, Diderot, and Rousseau. Conducted in French. W 1:30–3:20

FREN 893a/CPLT 899a, Realism and Naturalism Maurice Samuels

This seminar interrogates the nineteenth-century French Realist and Naturalist novel in light of various efforts to define its practice. How does critical theory constitute Realism as a category? How does Realism articulate the aims of theory? And how do nineteenth-century Realist and Naturalist novels intersect with other discourses besides the literary? In addition to several works by Balzac, novels to be studied include Stendhal’s Le Rouge et le Noir, Sand’s Indiana, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and Zola’s Nana. Some attention also paid to Realist painting. Reading knowledge of French required. T 1:30–3:20

FREN 911a, Stéphane Mallarmé Thomas Connolly

This seminar explores the multiple aspects of Mallarmé’s oeuvre, the authors and literary movements to which it responds, and the far-reaching repercussions it has had throughout the twentieth century and up to the present day. How has Mallarmé transformed the ways we read, write, and think about literature, art, music, dance, literary theory, and philosophy? In addition to extensive readings within Mallarmé’s oeuvre, we read poems by Albiach, Bonnefoy, Celan, du Bouchet, Geoffrey Hill, Ponge, Ungaretti, and Valéry. Critical and theoretical texts include Badiou, Blanchot, de Man, Derrida, Gadamer, Johnson, Kristeva, Marchal, Mondor, and Richard. Reading knowledge of French required. M 9:25–11:15

FREN 929b/CPLT 728b, Chance and Constraints in Literature Morgane Cadieu

The course explores experimental prose in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by focusing on ’pataphysics, surrealism, Oulipo, the Situationists, New Novel, and post-exoticism. Topics include inspiration and creativity; automatic writing and constrained literature; determinism and free will; the aesthetics of randomness; exceptions to the rule; materialism and atomism. Works by Jarry, Duchamp, Breton, Debord, Perec, Queneau, Garréta, Beckett, Calle, Volodine. Theoretical readings by Lucretius, Spinoza, Althusser, Derrida, Serres, Nancy. Conducted in French. TH 1:30–3:20

FREN 933a/CPLT 513a, One Hundred Years of Swann’s WayAlice Kaplan

The first volume of Proust’s Recherche has inspired generations of literary critics, psychoanalysts, philosophers, historians, translators, and critical theorists. Reading Du côté de chez Swann in light of their responses to the novel allows us to construct an intellectual and literary history of a century of reading Proust. TH 9:25–11:15

FREN 943a/AFAM 851a/CPLT 989a, Creole Identities and Fictions  Christopher Miller

Focusing on the French and English Caribbean, the course analyzes the quintessential but ambiguous American condition: that of the “Creole.” Encompassing all non-native cultures, this term is inseparable from issues of race and slavery. Readings of historical and literary texts: Moreau de Saint-Méry, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Madame de Staël, Charlotte Brontë (and reinventions of Wuthering Heights by Jean Rhys and Maryse Condé), the Créolistes of Martinique. Attention to Louisiana and to the Haitian Revolution. Reading knowledge of French required. TH 1:30–3:20

FREN 965b, On Violence: Politics and Aesthetics Across the Maghreb Jill Jarvis

A study of twentieth-century Maghrebi texts and films that document, theorize, and critique forms of political violence. How might aesthetic works—novels, plays, poems, torture and prison testimonies, graphic narratives, political cartoons, films—run counter to state-sanctioned memory projects or compel rethinking practices of testimony and justice for a postcolonial time? Works by Kateb, Djebar, Méchakra, Farès, Laredj, Djaout, Toumi, Alleg, Boupacha, Meddeb, Barrada, Ben Jelloun, Binebine, Laâbi. Theoretical readings by Fanon, Mbembe, Khatibi, Kilito, Benjamin, Derrida, Butler and Athanasiou, Spivak. M 1:30–3:20

FREN 980a, Seminar on the Profession Christopher Miller

Open only to French department graduate students entering the job market, this workshop concentrates on the skills and the materials needed for candidacy. Individual and group activities throughout the fall term. Intense focus on the preparation of written materials, followed by training in performative skills. For credit (does not count toward sixteen-course requirement). Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

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Genetics

Sterling Hall of Medicine I313, 203.785.5846

http://medicine.yale.edu/genetics

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

To be announced

Director of Graduate Studies

Marc Hammarlund

Professors Allen Bale, Susan Baserga (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), W. Roy Breg, Jr. (Emeritus), Lynn Cooley, Daniel DiMaio, Patrick Gallagher (Pediatrics), Joel Gelernter (Psychiatry; Neuroscience), Antonio Giraldez, Peter Glazer (Therapeutic Radiology), Jeffrey Gruen (Pediatrics), Murat Gunel (Neurosurgery), Karen Hirschi (Internal Medicine/Cardiology), Arthur Horwich, Kenneth Kidd, Haifan Lin (Cell Biology), Maurice Mahoney, Michael Nitabach (Cellular & Molecular Physiology), Charles Radding (Emeritus), Margretta Seashore, Nenad Sestan (Neuroscience), Gerald Shadel (Pathology), Carolyn Slayman, Stefan Somlo (Internal Medicine/Nephrology), Joann Sweasy (Therapeutic Radiology), Peter Tattersall (Laboratory Medicine), Sherman Weissman, Tian Xu, Hongyu Zhao (Public Health; Biostatistics)

Associate Professors Martina Brueckner (Pediatrics/Cardiology), Keith Choate (Dermatology), Valentina Greco, Marc Hammarlund, Natalia Ivanova, Mustafa Khokha (Pediatrics), Peining Li, Jun Lu, Arya Mani (Internal Medicine), James Noonan, In-Hyun Park, Valerie Reinke, Curt Scharfe, Zhaoxia Sun, Scott Weatherbee

Assistant Professors Kaya Bilguvar, Sidi Chen, Chris Cotsapas (Neurology), Smita Krishnaswamy, Janghoo Lim, Michele Spencer-Manzon, Andrew Xiao, Hui Zhang

Fields of Study

Molecular Genetics: chromosome structure and function, genetic recombination, viral genetics, DNA damage repair, ribosome biogenesis, protein folding, neurodegenerative diseases, non-coding RNA function, and the regulation of gene expression. Genomics: genome mapping, genome modification, high-throughput technology, evolutionary genetics, and functional genomics. Cellular and Developmental Genetics: limb development, kidney development, cilia function, stem cell development, genetic control of the cytoskeleton, cell death, aging, cell fate determination, cell cycle progression, cell migration, cell signaling, and growth control. Cancer Genetics: oncogenesis and tumor suppression, tumor progression and metastasis. Model Organism Genetics: forward genetic screens in Drosophila, C. elegans, yeast, zebrafish, frogs, and mouse, transposon and insertional mutagenesis, gene and protein trapping, mosaic genetics. Medical Genetics: genetic basis of human disease, chromosome rearrangements, population and quantitative genetics.

Special Admissions Requirements

The department welcomes applicants who have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in biology, chemistry, or a related field, with experience (from course work and/or research) in the field of genetics. GRE General Test scores are required. A pertinent Subject Test in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biology, or Chemistry is recommended.

To enter the Ph.D. program, students apply to the Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development (MCGD) track within the interdepartmental graduate program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS), http://bbs.yale.edu.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

The Ph.D. program in Genetics is designed to provide the student with a broad background in general genetics and the opportunity to conduct original research in a specific area of genetics. The student is expected to acquire a broad understanding of genetics, spanning knowledge of at least three basic areas of genetics, which include molecular, cellular, organismal, and population genetics. Normally this requirement is accomplished through the satisfactory completion of formal courses, many of which cover more than one of these areas. Students are required to pass at least five graduate-level courses that are taken for a grade. Advanced graduate study becomes increasingly focused on the successful completion of original research and the preparation of a written dissertation under the direct supervision of a faculty adviser along with the guidance of a thesis committee.

A qualifying examination is given during the second year of study. This examination consists of a period of directed reading with the faculty followed by the submission of two written proposals and an oral examination. Following the completion of course work and the qualifying examination, the student submits a dissertation prospectus and is admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. There is no language requirement. An important aspect of graduate training in genetics is the acquisition of communication and teaching skills. Students participate in presentation seminars and two terms (or the equivalent) of teaching at the TF-10 level. Teaching activities are drawn from a diverse menu of lecture, laboratory, and seminar courses given at the undergraduate, graduate, and medical school levels. Students are not expected to teach during their first year. In addition to all other requirements, students must successfully complete GENE 901b, First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research, prior to the end of their first year of study. In their fourth year of study, all students must successfully complete B&BS 503b, RCR Refresher for Senior BBS Students.

Honors Requirement

Students must meet the Graduate School’s Honors requirement by the end of the fourth term of full-time study.

M.D./Ph.D. Students

M.D./Ph.D. students affiliate with the Department of Genetics graduate program via a different route than other incoming graduate students in the department, resulting in some modification of the academic requirements for the Ph.D. portion of the M.D./Ph.D. degree. Typically, one or more research rotations is done during the first two years of medical school (in many cases, the first rotation is done during the summer between years one and two). No set number of research rotations is required. M.D./Ph.D. students officially affiliate with the Department of Genetics after selecting a thesis adviser and consulting with the DGS. M.D./Ph.D. students interested in Genetics are required to consult with the DGS prior to formal affiliation to determine an appropriate set of courses tailored to the student’s background and interests.

The courses, rotations, and teaching requirements for M.D./Ph.D. students entering the Genetics graduate program (see below) are modified from the normal requirements for Ph.D. students. Besides the modifications in these three requirements, M.D./Ph.D. students in the Department of Genetics are subject to all of the same requirements as the other graduate students in the department.

Courses Four graduate-level courses taken for a grade are required (two Yale graduate-level courses taken for a grade during medical school may be counted toward this requirement at the discretion of the DGS). Course work is aimed at providing a firm basis in genetics and in cellular molecular mechanisms, with graduate-level proficiency in genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry.

Required courses: In addition to the four graduate-level courses, all M.D./Ph.D. students must take: Genomic Methods for Genetic Analysis (GENE 760b); Graduate Student Seminar: Critical Analysis and Presentation of Scientific Literature (2 terms; GENE 675a and b, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory); Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research (as part of GENE 901b, graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory).

Recommended courses: Advanced Eukaryotic Molecular Biology (GENE 743b); Biochemical and Biophysical Approaches in Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCDB 630b); Molecules to Systems (CBIO 502); Molecular and Cellular Basis of Human Disease (CBIO 601).

Electives: Other courses may be taken in a wide variety of fields relevant to the biological and biomedical sciences.

Laboratory rotations One or more rotations are necessary to identify a thesis adviser. No set number of research rotations is required.

Teaching One term of teaching is required. Previous teaching while enrolled at the Yale School of Medicine may count toward this requirement at the discretion of the DGS.

Qualifying exam M.D./Ph.D. students take their qualifying exam in the term following the completion of their course work. The structure of the qualifying exam is identical to that for other Ph.D. students in Genetics. Students read with three faculty members for five weeks, one of whom supervises the reading on the thesis research topic, but who is not the thesis adviser. The following two weeks are devoted to writing two research proposals, one on the student’s thesis research. An oral exam follows in the eighth week.

Prospectus M.D./Ph.D. students submit their prospectus once their qualifying exam has been completed, but no later than the 30th of June following their exam.

Candidacy M.D./Ph.D. students will be admitted to candidacy once they have completed their course work, obtained two Honors grades, passed their qualifying exam, and submitted their dissertation prospectus.

Thesis committee M.D./Ph.D. students are required to have one thesis committee meeting per year, beginning the term after passing their qualifying exam. However, students are strongly encouraged to consider having additional meetings if they feel their project could benefit from the assistance of members of the thesis committee.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.S. Students are not admitted for this degree. They may receive this recognition if they leave Yale without completing the qualifying exam but have satisfied the course requirements as described above, as well as the Graduate School’s Honors requirement. Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.S.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit the BBS Web site (http://bbs.yale.edu), MCGD Track.

Courses

GENE 555a/CPSC 553aU, Computational Methods for the Analysis and Modeling of Biological Data Smita Krishnaswamy

This course introduces biology as a systems and data science through open computational problems in biology, the types of high-throughput data that are being produced by modern biological technologies, and computational approaches that may be used to tackle such problems. We cover applications of machine-learning methods in the analysis of high-throughput biological data, especially focusing on genomic and proteomic data, including denoising data; nonlinear dimensionality reduction for visualization and progression analysis; unsupervised clustering; and information theoretic analysis of gene regulatory and signaling networks. Students’ grades are based on programming assignments, a midterm, a paper presentation, and a final project. Prerequisite: GENE 760 or permission of the instructor. TTH 9–10:15

GENE 625a/MB&B 625au/MCDB 625au, Basic Concepts of Genetic Analysis  Tian Xu and staff

The universal principles of genetic analysis in eukaryotes are discussed in lectures. Students also read a small selection of primary papers illustrating the very best of genetic analysis and dissect them in detail in the discussion sections. While other Yale graduate molecular genetics courses emphasize molecular biology, this course focuses on the concepts and logic underlying modern genetic analysis. MW 11:35–12:50

[GENE 645b/BIS 645b/CB&B 647b, Statistical Methods in Human Genetics]

GENE 655a/CBIO 655a, Stem Cells: Biology and Application In-Hyun Park, Haifan Lin, and faculty

This course is designed for first-year or second-year students to learn the fundamentals of stem cell biology and to gain familiarity with current research in the field. The course is presented in a lecture and discussion format based on primary literature. Topics include stem cell concepts, methodologies for stem cell research, embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, cloning and stem cell reprogramming, and clinical applications of stem cell research. Prerequisites: undergraduate-level cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics. TH 1:30–3

GENE 675a and b, Graduate Student Seminar: Critical Analysis and Presentation of Scientific Literature Valentina Greco and staff

Students gain experience in preparing and delivering seminars and in discussing presentations by other students. A variety of topics in molecular, cellular, developmental, and population genetics are covered. Required of all second-year students in Genetics. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. W 1:30–3

GENE 703b, The Mouse in Biomedical Research Caroline Zeiss

This course describes aspects of comparative genomics, construction of genetically altered mice, mouse phenotyping, and study design relevant to the use of mice in the study of human disease. Prerequisites: undergraduate-level knowledge of genetics and mammalian anatomy and physiology.

GENE 734a/MB&B 734a/MBIO 734a, Molecular Biology of Animal Viruses  Brett Lindenbach

Lecture course with emphasis on mechanisms of viral replication, oncogenic transformation, and virus-host cell interactions. MW 10–11:30

GENE 743b/MB&B 743bu/MCDB 743b, Advanced Eukaryotic Molecular Biology  Mark Hochstrasser, Karla Neugebauer, Matthew Simon, Patrick Sung

Selected topics in transcriptional control, regulation of chromatin structure, mRNA processing, mRNA stability, RNA interference, translation, protein degradation, DNA replication, DNA repair, site-specific DNA recombination, somatic hypermutation. Prerequisite: biochemistry or permission of the instructor. TTH 11:35–12:50

GENE 749a/MB&B 749au, Medical Impact of Basic Science Joan Steitz, I. George Miller, Andrew Miranker, Karla Neugebauer, David Schatz, Thomas Steitz, and staff

Consideration of examples of recent discoveries in basic science that have elucidated the molecular origins of disease or that have suggested new therapies for disease. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles on which these advances rely. Reading is from the primary scientific and medical literature, with emphasis on developing the ability to read this literature critically. Aimed primarily at undergraduates. Prerequisite: biochemistry or permission of the instructor. MW 1–2:15

GENE 760b, Genomic Methods for Genetic Analysis James Noonan

Introduction to the analysis and interpretation of genomic datasets. The focus is on next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications including RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, and exome and whole genome sequencing. By the end of the course, each student will be able to process and analyze large-scale NGS datasets and interpret the results. This course is intended only for graduate students who are interested in applying genomic approaches in their thesis research. At a minimum, students must have basic familiarity with working in a UNIX/Linux computing environment. Prior experience with shell scripting or a scripting language such as Perl, Python, or Ruby is strongly recommended. Interested students must contact the instructor early in the fall term to discuss their prior experience and expectations for the course. Enrollment limited to twenty. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

GENE 777b/MCDB 677b, Mechanisms of Development Valerie Reinke and staff

An advanced course on mechanisms of animal development focusing on the genetic specification of cell organization and identity during embryogenesis and somatic differentiation. The use of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways to carry out developmental decisions in a range of animals is highlighted. Course work includes student participation in critical analysis of primary literature and a research proposal term paper. W 1:30–3:20

GENE 840a and b, Medical Genetics Margretta Seashore

Clinical rotation offering medical and graduate students the opportunity to participate in the Genetic Consultation Clinic, genetic rounds, consultation rounds, and genetic analysis of clinical diagnostic problems.

GENE 900a/CBIO 900a/MCDB 900a, First-Year Introduction to Research—Grant Writing and Scientific Communication Scott Holley and faculty

Grant writing, scientific communication, and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. M 4–5:30

GENE 901b/CBIO 901b/MCDB 901b, First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research Joerg Bewersdorf

Ethics and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. TH 4:15–5:45

GENE 911a/CBIO 911a/MCDB 911a, First Laboratory Rotation

First laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

GENE 912b/CBIO 912b/MCDB 912b, Second Laboratory Rotation Craig Crews

Second laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

GENE 913b/CBIO 913b/MCDB 913b, Third Laboratory Rotation Craig Crews

Third laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students.

GENE 921a and b, Reading Course in Genetics and Molecular Biology 

Directed reading with faculty. Term paper required. Prerequisite: permission of Genetics DGS.

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Geology and Geophysics

Kline Geology Laboratory, 203.432.3124

http://earth.yale.edu

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Jay Ague

Director of Graduate Studies

Jun Korenaga

Professors Jay Ague, David Bercovici, Ruth Blake, Mark Brandon, Derek Briggs, David Evans, Alexey Fedorov, Debra Fischer, Jacques Gauthier, Shun-ichiro Karato, Jun Korenaga, Mark Pagani, Jeffrey Park, Peter Raymond, Danny Rye, James Saiers, Ronald Smith, John Wettlaufer

Associate Professors William Boos, Kanani Lee, Maureen Long, Trude Storelvmo, Mary-Louise Timmermans

Assistant Professors Bhart-Anjan Bhullar, Pincelli Hull, Noah Planavsky, Nadine Unger

Fields of Study

Fields include geochemistry and petrology, geophysics, ice physics, mineral physics, seismology and geodynamics, structural geology and tectonics, paleontology and paleoecology, oceanography, meteorology, cryospheric dynamics, and climatology.

Special Admissions Requirements

The department welcomes applicants oriented toward the earth sciences who have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in such fields as biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, meteorology, or physics, as well as those trained in geological, geophysical, and geochemical sciences. Scores from a pertinent GRE Subject Test are desirable but not required. The TOEFL or IELTS exam is required of all applicants for whom English is a second language.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

There is no formal language requirement and no required curriculum. Students plan their course of study in consultation with their adviser to meet individual interests and needs and to lay the foundations for dissertation research. At the end of the first year the faculty reviews the standing of each student. A student recommended for continuation in the Ph.D. program will be so notified. Some students may be encouraged at that time to pursue only the M.S. degree. At the end of the second year the faculty reviews each student’s overall performance to determine whether he or she is qualified to continue for the Ph.D. degree. In order to qualify, a student must have met the Graduate School Honors requirement and maintained a better than passing record in the areas of concentration. Also, a student must have satisfied the requirements of the Qualifying Exam by having completed two Research Discourses termed (according to their degree of development) the Minor and the Major Discourses. The Major Discourse will be presented at the Qualifying Presentation, followed by an extended question period wherein the student must successfully defend both Discourses. Remaining degree requirements include a dissertation review in the third year; the preparation and defense of the dissertation; and the submission of the dissertation to the Graduate School. The department requires that an additional copy, for which the student will be reimbursed, be deposited with the librarian of the Kline Geology Library.

Teaching experience is regarded as an integral part of the graduate training program in Geology and Geophysics. For that reason all students are required to serve as teaching fellows (5 hours per week) for two terms during the course of their predoctoral training.

In addition to all other requirements, students must successfully complete G&G 710b, Responsible and Ethical Conduct of Research, prior to the end of their first year of study.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.S. Awarded only to students who are not continuing for the Ph.D. Students are not admitted for this degree. Minimum requirements include satisfactory performance in a course of study (typically six or more courses with at least one Honors grade in a graduate-level class) that is approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS), and a research project with the approval of the DGS and the student’s thesis committee.

Program materials are available at http://earth.yale.edu or upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, PO Box 208109, New Haven CT 06520-8109; e-mail, dgs@geology.yale.edu.

Courses

[G&G 501bU/ASTR 540bU, Radiative Processes in Astrophysics/Stellar Atmospheres]

G&G 502au, Introduction to Geochemistry Mark Pagani

Basic principles of geochemistry and their use in geological science. Thermodynamics of aqueous and igneous systems. Element fractionation and isotope geochemistry. Biogeochemical cycles, geochronology, cosmochemistry. TTH 11:35–12:50

[G&G 504au, Minerals and Human Health]

G&G 507a, Experimental Methods in Earth Sciences Shun-ichiro Karato

Methods of experimental studies under high pressures and temperatures. Methods of quantitative laboratory analysis of rocks, minerals, and fluids in geological and planetary sciences. A seminar course that includes laboratory exercises providing background on interdisciplinary techniques such as electron microscopy; optical, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy; and x-ray diffraction techniques.

[G&G 508b, The Global Carbon Cycle]

[G&G 510a, Introduction to Isotope Geochemistry]

G&G 512au, Structure and Deformation of the Lithosphere Mark Brandon

An examination of the equations governing rotating stratified flows with application to oceanic and atmospheric circulation as well as climate. Mathematical models are used to illustrate the fundamental dynamical principles of geophysical fluid phenomena such as waves, boundary layers, flow stability, turbulence, and large-scale flows. The course aims to provide a general theoretical framework for understanding the structure and circulation of the ocean and the atmosphere. MW 11:35–12:50

G&G 513au, Invertebrate Paleontology: Evolving Form and Function Derek Briggs

Exploration of the basic constraints and potentials that controlled adaptive radiation in the evolution of the invertebrate skeleton. MW 11:35–12:50

G&G 519au, Introduction to the Physics and Chemistry of Earth Materials  Kanani Lee

Basic principles that control the physical and chemical properties of Earth materials. Equation of state, phase transformations, chemical reactions, elastic properties, diffusion, kinetics of reaction, and mass/energy transport. TTh 1–2:15

G&G 521bu, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Mary-Louise Timmermans

An examination of the equations governing rotating stratified flows with application to oceanic and atmospheric circulation as well as climate. Mathematical models are used to illustrate the fundamental dynamical principles of geophysical fluid phenomena such as waves, boundary layers, flow stability, turbulence, and large-scale flows. The course aims to provide a general theoretical framework for understanding the structure and circulation of the ocean and the atmosphere. MW 11:35–12:50

G&G 522au, Physics of Weather and Climate William Boos

The climatic system; survey of atmospheric behavior on time scales from days (i.e., weather) to decades (i.e., climate); formulation of mathematical equations describing weather and climate with selected applications to small- and large-scale phenomena. TTH 1–2:15

G&G 523bU, Climate Dynamics Alexey Fedorov

A survey of fluid dynamics with application to circulation in the ocean and atmosphere, as well as mantle and core. Mathematical models are used to illustrate the fundamental dynamical principles of geophysical fluid phenomena such as convection, waves, boundary layers, flow stability, turbulence, and large-scale flows. The course aims to provide a general theoretical framework for understanding the structure and circulation of the ocean, atmosphere, and Earth’s interior. MW 11:35–12:50

[G&G 524a, Mathematical Methods in Geophysics]

[G&G 526au, Introduction to Earth and Planetary Physics]

G&G 528aU, Science of Complex Systems Jun Korenaga

Introduction to the quantitative analysis of systems with many degrees of freedom. Fundamental components in the science of complex systems, including how to simulate complex systems, how to analyze model behaviors, and how to validate models using observations. Topics include cellular automata, bifurcation theory, deterministic chaos, self-organized criticality, renormalization, and inverse theory. MW 9–10:15

G&G 529b, Introduction to Geodynamics Jun Korenaga

This introductory course starts with the basics of continuum mechanics and covers a range of topics in geodynamics and relevant fields including the structure and dynamics of lithosphere, thermal convection and magmatism, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and plume dynamics, geoid and dynamic topography, and the thermal history of the core and geodynamo. MW 9–10:15

[G&G 533au, Paleogeography]

G&G 535au, Physical Oceanography Alexey Fedorov

An introduction to ocean dynamics and physical processes controlling the large-scale ocean circulation, ocean stratification, the Gulf Stream, wind-driven waves, tides, tsunamis, coastal upwelling, and other oceanic phenomena. Equations of motion. Modern observational, theoretical, and numerous other techniques used to study the ocean. The ocean role in climate and global climate change. MW 11:35–12:50

[G&G 536b, Atmospheric Waves, Convection, and Vortices]

G&G 538a/ASTR 520a, Computational Methods in Astrophysics and Geophysics Paolo Coppi

The analytic and numerical/computational tools necessary for effective research in astronomy, geophysics, and related disciplines. Topics include numerical solutions to differential equations, spectral methods, and Monte Carlo simulations. Applications are made to common astrophysical and geophysical problems including fluids and N-body simulations.

[G&G 540au, Methods in Geomicrobiology]

[G&G 545a, Marine Micropaleontology]

[G&G 555aU, Thermodynamics of Mountain Belts]

G&G 556bU, Introduction to Seismology Maureen Long

Earthquakes and seismic waves, P and S waves, surface waves and free oscillations. Remote sensing of Earth’s deep interior and faulting mechanisms. Prerequisites: MATH 120, 222, and PHYS 181, or equivalents.

[G&G 557b, Advanced Seismology]

G&G 562bu/ARCG 762bu/EMD 548b/F&ES 726b, Observing Earth from Space  Xuhui Lee

A practical introduction to satellite image analysis of Earth’s surface. Topics include the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, satellite-borne radiometers, data transmission and storage, computer image analysis, the merging of satellite imagery with GIS and applications to weather and climate, oceanography, surficial geology, ecology and epidemiology, forestry, agriculture, archaeology, and watershed management.

[G&G 567bu, Geochemical Approaches to Archaeology]

[G&G 570b, Cloud Physics and Dynamics]

G&G 602bu, Paleoclimates Mark Pagani

A study of the dynamic evolution of Earth’s climate. Topics include warm (the Cretaceous, the Eocene, the PETM, the Pliocene) and cold (the “snowball Earth”) climates of the past, glacial cycles, abrupt climate changes, the climate of the past thousand years, and the climate of the twentieth century. TTH 11:35–12:50

[G&G 610bu, Advanced Topics in Macroevolution]

[G&G 616a, Advanced Petrology] 

[G&G 618a, Petrology of Light Stable Isotopes]

[G&G 621b, Geochemistry of Heavy and Radioactive Isotopes in Rock Systems]

G&G 631a, Vertebrate Paleontology: Phylogeny of Vertebrates Jacques Gauthier

The seminar offers a detailed look at current issues in the phylogeny, anatomy, and evolution of fossil and recent vertebrates. Lectures review the broad outline of vertebrate phylogeny and evolution. Lab section is required. HTBA

[G&G 644b, Mantle Dynamics and Geochemistry]

[G&G 650bu, Deformation of Earth Materials]

[G&G 655au, Extraordinary Glimpses of Past Life]

[G&G 657a, Marine, Atmospheric, and Surficial Geochemistry]

[G&G 658b, Seismic Data Analysis]

[G&G 659a, Time Series Analysis with Geoscience Applications]

G&G 666a/AMTH 666a/ASTR 666a, Classical Statistical Thermodynamics  John Wettlaufer

Classical thermodynamics is derived from statistical thermodynamics. Using the multi­particle nature of physical systems, we derive ergodicity, the central limit theorem, and the elemental description of the second law of thermodynamics. We then develop kinetics, transport theory, and reciprocity from the linear thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Topics of focus include Onsager reciprocal relations, the Fokker-Planck equation, stability in the sense of Lyapunov, and time invariance symmetry. We explore phenomena that are of direct relevance to astrophysical and geophysical settings. No quantum mechanics is necessary as a prerequisite.

[G&G 675b, Quantitative Tectonics]

G&G 690a and b, Directed Research in Geology and Geophysics

By arrangement with faculty.

G&G 691a or b, Independent Research

In addition to the seminars noted below, others on special topics like evolution, invertebrate and vertebrate paleontology, statistical mechanics and spectroscopy, structural geology and tectonics, petrology, volcanology, and physics of oceans and atmospheres are offered according to student interest, by arrangement with departmental faculty. Seminars are often organized around the research interests of visiting faculty as well. Prerequisite: approval of DGS and adviser.

G&G 701b, The Warming Papers Trude Storelvmo

Weekly presentation and discussion of papers representing the scientific foundation for the climate change forecast. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students. No formal prerequisites, but basic calculus and university-level physics are helpful.

G&G 703a, Seminar in Systematics Jacques Gauthier

3 HTBA

G&G 710a, Responsible and Ethical Conduct of Research Alexey Fedorov

A 5-to-6-week lecture course (1 hour) that is required of all graduate students and must be completed within the first year. Course topics include record keeping and data management/retention; plagiarism and fraud; collaboration, coauthorship, and ownership of research materials and intellectual property; laboratory dynamics and sexual harassment. G&G 710a is in addition to the existing online ethics module, “The Yale Guide to Professional Ethics” (https://www.sis.yale.edu/pls/rcr/login_c_pkg.go_to_front_door), that must be completed by all GSAS students within the first term of study, regardless of source of financial support.

G&G 719b, Topics in Mineral Physics Kanani Lee

The seminar focuses on advanced topics in planetary structure, composition, and evolution from the perspective of mineral physics. The seminar relies on both classic mineral physics papers as well as recently published results. T 3:30–5

[G&G 735a, Principles in Organic Geochemistry]

[G&G 740a, Student Research Seminar]

G&G 742b, Seminar in Polar Processes and Climate John Wettlaufer, Mary-Louise Timmermans

This course is a forum for reading and discussing a selection of papers related to the climate of the polar regions. Atmosphere, ice, and ocean processes and interactions are studied in the context of arctic and global climate.

G&G 744b, Seminar in Mantle and Core Processes David Bercovici

T 4–5:30

[G&G 746a or b, Seminar in Climate and Energy]

G&G 747a or b, Topics in Geochemistry

[G&G 757b, Studies in Global Geoscience]

G&G 765b, General Circulation of Planetary Atmospheres William Boos

TTH 1–2:15

G&G 767b, Seminar in Ice Physics John Wettlaufer

We bring together the basic thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of crystal growth, surface phase transitions, metastability, and instability to explore the many faces of the surface of ice. These processes control the macroscopic growth shapes of ice crystals, underlie the enigma of the snowflake, and have implications in, inter alia, the atmosphere, the oceans, basic materials science, and astrophysics.

G&G 775a and b, Seminar in Lithosphere and Surface Processes Noah Planavsky, Mark Brandon

The seminar focuses on advanced topics in the evolution and structure of the lithosphere. The theme for the seminar changes each term, covering topics such as the restoration of continents in deep time, true polar wander, lithospheric instabilities, orogenesis at convergent plate boundaries, interactions between climate and tectonics. Meetings are for 1.5 hours, once a week, and are organized around readings from the primary research literature.

G&G 800a or b, Tutorial in Paleobiology

G&G 810a or b, Tutorial in Structural Geology and Tectonics or Solid Earth Geophysics

G&G 820a or b, Tutorial in Meteorology, Oceanography, or Fluid Dynamics

G&G 830a or b, Tutorial in Geochemistry, Petrology, or Mineralogy

G&G 840a or b, Tutorial in Sedimentology

G&G 860a or b, Tutorial in Remote Sensing

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Germanic Languages and Literatures

W. L. Harkness Hall, 203.432.0788

http://german.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Kirk Wetters

Director of Graduate Studies

Brigitte Peucker [F]

Carol Jacobs [Sp]

Professors Rüdiger Campe (on leave [F]), Carol Jacobs (on leave [F]), Rainer Nägele (Emeritus), Paul North, Brigitte Peucker, Henry Sussman (Visiting), Kirk Wetters

Affiliated Faculty Jeffrey Alexander (Sociology), Seyla Benhabib (Political Science; Philosophy; on leave [Sp]), Karsten Harries (Philosophy), Gundula Kreuzer (Music), Patrick McCreless (Music; on leave [Sp]), Steven Smith (Political Science; on leave [Sp]), David Sorkin (History), Nicola Suthor (History of Art), Katie Trumpener (Comparative Literature; English; on leave [F])

Fields of Study

German literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland; literary and cultural theory; literature and philosophy; literature and science; media history and theory; visuality and German cinema.

Special Admissions Requirement

All students must provide evidence of mastery of German upon application.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students are required to demonstrate, besides proficiency in German, a reading knowledge of one other foreign language in the third term of study. French is recommended, although occasionally, on consultation with the director of graduate studies (DGS), other relevant languages may be substituted. The faculty in German considers teaching to be essential to the professional preparation of graduate students. Four terms of teaching are required beginning in the third year of study. Students normally teach undergraduate language courses under supervision for at least three terms. Other teaching experiences are available thereafter in literature, theory, film, etc.

In the first two years of study, students take four courses per term. Three of these sixteen courses in the first four terms may be audited.

Oral examinations must be passed in the fifth and sixth terms of study, and a dissertation prospectus should be submitted no later than the end of the sixth term. All students will be asked to defend the prospectus in an informal discussion with the faculty. The defense will take place before the prospectus is officially approved, usually in May of the sixth term. Students are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. upon completion of all predissertation requirements, including the prospectus.

After the submission of the prospectus, the student’s time is devoted mainly to the preparation of the dissertation. A dissertation committee will be set up for each student at work on the dissertation. It is expected that students will periodically pass their work along to members of their committee, so that faculty members in addition to the dissertation adviser can make suggestions well before the dissertation is submitted. Drafts of each chapter must be submitted in a timely fashion to all members of the student’s committee: The first chapter should be submitted to the committee by February 1 of the fourth year of study; the second chapter should be submitted by January 1 of the fifth year. There will be a formal review of the first chapter.

Two concentrations are available to graduate students: Germanic Literature and German Studies. There is a special combined degree with Film and Media Studies; see below.

Special Requirements for the Germanic Literature Concentration

During the first two years of study, students are required to take sixteen term courses, four of which may be taken outside the department. Three courses may be audited.

Special Requirements for the German Studies Concentration

During the first two years of study, students are required to take sixteen term courses, seven of which may be taken outside the department. Three of those courses may be audited. Students are asked to define an area of concentration and will meet with appropriate advisers from both within and outside the department.

Combined Ph.D. Program with Film and Media Studies

The Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures also offers, in conjunction with the Film and Media Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in Germanic Languages and Literatures and Film and Media Studies. For further details, see Film and Media Studies. Applicants to the combined program must indicate on their application that they are applying both to Film and Media Studies and to Germanic Languages and Literatures. All documentation within the application should include this information.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program may qualify for the M.A. degree upon completion of a minimum of eight graduate term courses and the demonstration of reading knowledge in either Latin or French.

Further information is available upon request to the Registrar, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Yale University, PO Box 208210, New Haven CT 06520-8210; e-mail, german@yale.edu.

Courses

GMAN 559bU/CPLT 560bU, Rilke and Yeats Carol Jacobs

Study of the works of two twentieth-century authors who, in very different ways, challenge conventional modes in which to think about the relationship between literature and what we tend to call reality. We ask how to think about the performance of art and its implicit theorizations as crucial to this issue, and ponder the difference between the commitment to and lack of interest in a thematics of lived life. The nature and purpose of the course are to practice close reading as a mode of thinking and a path to theorizing. We explore how that theorization of the text takes place, not in a separate sphere, but out of the details and performance of individual literary works. Although our classes settle on individual works, students are expected to read much more widely in the corpus of the two poets. TH 1:30–3:20

GMAN 607aU, Goethe’s FaustKirk Wetters

Goethe’s Faust, with special attention to Faust II and to the genesis of Faust in its various versions throughout Goethe’s lifetime; emphasis on the work in context of Goethe’s time and in the later reception and criticism. W 3:30–5:20

GMAN 642bU, Büchner: Between Comedy and Science Rudiger Campe

Close reading of works by Georg Büchner, romantic poet and founder of the anticlassical tradition in German literature. The range of Büchner’s writings in terms of discourse and performative style, including comedy, tragedy, psychological case study, political pamphlet, philosophical lecture, and scientific paper. Attention to the interrelation between literary and nonliterary semantics. Readings in English and German. Discussion in English.

GMAN 647bU/CPLT 651bU/PHIL 606bU, Systems and Their Theory  Henry Sussman

Conceptual systems that have, since the outset of modernity, furnished a format and platform for rigorous thinking at the same time that they have imposed on language the attributes of self-reflexivity, consistency, repetition, purity, and dependability. Texts by Kant, Hegel, Bergson, Kafka, Proust, and Borges. T 3:30–5:20

GMAN 651a/PHIL 734a/PLSC 583a, Contemporary Critical Theory  Seyla Benhabib

An examination of the themes of statelessness, migration, and exile in the works of Arendt, Benjamin, Adorno, Shklar, and Berlin. W 9:25–11:15

GMAN 711aU, Literature of Travel and Tourism Kirk Wetters

A critical, historical introduction to the functions of travel narratives in the modern period. Topics include travel and autobiography, cosmopolitanism, travel as a means of individual experience and education, the rise and fall of anthropology, and the contemporary culture of tourism. T 1:30–3:20

GMAN 722a/HSAR 718a, Mimesis in Art and Nature Paul North

Influential theories postulate that visual art and literature imitate nature. Recent scientific theories postulate that nature also imitates. We investigate what it means for anything to “look like” anything else, in readings of literature, art, and criticism. Authors and topics include Edgar Allan Poe, Nikolai Gogol, Oscar Wilde, and Gerhard Richter on portraiture; Emanuel Swedenborg, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, and René Magritte on correspondence; Aristotle, Erich Auerbach, and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe on mimesis; Goethe, Darwin, Kafka, and Günter Wagner on natural similarities and homology; Peirce, Warburg, and Walker Evans on iconicity. TH 3:30–5:20

GMAN 741a, Reading Late Capitalism Henry Sussman

This is a course on the fate of Marxian literature in view of the sociocultural history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course not only explores the parameters and dimensions of Marx’s core texts but also pursues the fate of such major constructs as the commodity, alienation, class conflict, and assembly-line manufacture in the literature, cinema, and theoretical oversight of both centuries. As much attention is devoted to the Marxian imaginary as to the isolation and analysis of the key arguments. With key amplifying readings by Flaubert, Zola, Kafka, Lukács, Benjamin, Derrida, Jameson, and Piketty. T 3:30–5:20

GMAN 757bU, Medieval German Romance and Epic Mary Paddock

Study of three great medieval works of Arthurian romance and courtly epic: Parzival, Tristan, and the Nibelungenlied. Literary transmission in both oral and written cultures, conventions and inventions of courtly narrative, courtly patronage and its historical context, moral and religious codes of knighthood and chivalric heroism. Readings in English translation. TH 3:30–5:20

GMAN 760bU/CPLT 905bU/FILM 760bU, Intermediality in Film Brigitte Peucker

Film is a hybrid medium, the meeting point of several others. This course focuses on the relationship of film to theater and painting, suggesting that where two media are in evidence, there is usually a third. Topics include space, motion, color, theatricality, tableau vivant, ekphrasis, spectatorship, and new media. Readings feature art historical and film theoretical texts as well as essays pertinent to specific films. Films by Fassbinder, Bergman, Murnau, von Trier, Rohmer, Godard, Kiarostami, and others, concluding with three films by Peter Greenaway. T 3:30–5:20

GMAN 900a,b, Directed Reading

By arrangement with the faculty.

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Global Affairs

Jackson Institute for Global Affairs

Horchow Hall, 203.432.3418

http://jackson.yale.edu/academics

M.A.S., M.A.

Director

James Levinsohn (Global Affairs; School of Management)

Director of Graduate Studies

Lloyd Grieger (Sociology)

Director of Student Affairs

Cristin Siebert (203.432.5954, cristin.siebert@yale.edu)

Professors Julia Adams (Sociology), Elizabeth Bradley (Public Health), John Gaddis (History; on leave [F]), Jeffrey Garten (School of Management), Jacob Hacker (Political Science), Oona Hathaway (Law), Stathis Kalyvas (Political Science), Paul Kennedy (History), James Levinsohn (School of Management), A. Mushfiq Mobarak (School of Management), Catherine Panter-Brick (Anthropology), W. Michael Reisman (Law), Susan Rose-Ackerman (Political Science; Law), Peter Schott (Economics; School of Management), Ian Shapiro (Political Science), Timothy Snyder (History), Aleh Tsyvinski (Economics), Christopher Udry (Economics), Steven Wilkinson (Political Science), Elisabeth Wood (Political Science), Ernesto Zedillo (International Economics & Politics)

Associate Professors Konstantinos Arkolakis (Economics), Ana De La O Torres (Political Science), Alexandre Debs (Political Science), Kaveh Khoshnood (Public Health), Jason Lyall (Political Science), Nuno Monteiro (Political Science), Nancy Qian (Economics), Jonathan Wyrtzen (Sociology; International Affairs; on leave)

Assistant Professors Katharine Baldwin (Political Science; on leave), Lorenzo Caliendo (Economics; School of Management), Zack Cooper (Public Health), Lloyd Grieger (Sociology), Daniel Keniston (Economics), Thania Sanchez (Political Science)

Senior Lecturers Charles Hill (International Security Studies), Justin Thomas

Lecturers Michael Boozer (Economics), Christopher Fussell, William Casey King, Matthew Kocher (Political Science), Alice Miller (Public Health; Law), Vimal Ranchhod

Visiting Professors*

Senior Fellows* Sigga Benediktsdottir, Eric Braverman, David Brooks, Howard Dean, Rosemary DiCarlo, Robert Ford, Thomas Graham, Unni Karunakara, Clare Lockhart, Stanley McChrystal, Stephen Roach, Dennis Ross, Emma Sky

*For a complete list of visiting professors and senior fellows, see the Jackson Institute Web site.

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs nurtures degree programs and scholarship with a strong interdisciplinary and policy-oriented international focus. The programmatic interests of the institute focus on development and security.

The Jackson Institute for Global Affairs administers the two-year Master of Arts (M.A.) and the one-year Master of Advanced Study (M.A.S.) degrees in Global Affairs. The fifty to sixty students in the M.A. program combine fundamental training in core disciplines in Global Affairs with an individualized concentration that has relevance to current international issues. Students in the M.A.S. program select courses based on their individual academic and professional goals. In addition to courses in the Global Affairs program, students take courses throughout the Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Yale’s professional schools.

Fields of Study

The programs are designed to combine breadth of knowledge of the basic disciplines of global affairs with depth of specialization in a particular academic discipline, geographic area, specialized functional issue, and/or professional field. The M.A. program is designed primarily for students seeking an advanced degree before beginning a career in global affairs; joint degrees are offered with the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, the Law School, the School of Management, and the School of Public Health. The M.A.S. program is aimed at midcareer professionals with extensive experience in a field of global affairs such as, but not limited to, international security, diplomacy, and development.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants to either program must take the GRE General Test; students whose native language is not English and who did not earn their undergraduate degree at an English-language university must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The minimum score on the TOEFL is 610 on the paper-based test or 102 on the Internet-based test. Entering M.A. students are strongly encouraged to have taken introductory courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics prior to matriculation.

Special Requirements for the M.A. Degree

The M.A. in Global Affairs requires two years of graduate study at Yale. To complete the degree, students must pass sixteen courses that fulfill the core and concentration requirements, demonstrate proficiency in a modern language, complete a summer internship or project, and maintain the grade average specified below.

Core Students take GLBL 801, 802, and 803 during the first term of enrollment.

Concentration Beyond the core courses and courses taken in fulfillment of the language requirement, each student must identify and demonstrate the academic integrity of a coherent set of courses as a proposed concentration for approval by the director of graduate studies (DGS). Students are able to develop concentrations based on a topical, regional, or disciplinary focus, or a combination of a topical and regional focus. Sample concentrations are available from the Jackson Institute Web site.

Language requirement The equivalent of four terms of language study at Yale is required to graduate. This competence must be demonstrated through successful completion of a Yale L4 class or by testing into a Yale L5 class. International students who completed secondary school or a university degree in a language other than English will be considered to have met the language requirement. Students may study language as part of their Yale program.

Summer internship requirement All students enrolled in the Global Affairs M.A. program are required to use the summer between the first and second years of the program to further their professional or academic education. It is expected that this requirement be fulfilled by obtaining experience through full-time employment or a full-time internship. The requirement may also be fulfilled by completing language study, other relevant course work, or independent research on an approved topic.

Each first-year student must file a form with the director of career services before June 1 stating the nature of his or her summer internship or approved alternative and submit a self-evaluation form by September 1.

Expectation of academic performance M.A. candidates are required to achieve at least two grades of Honors, while maintaining a High Pass average. To remain in good academic standing at the end of the first year, M.A. students are expected to complete half of the course work required for the degree, with at least a High Pass average and one grade of Honors. Students who do not have at least a High Pass average or the required number of courses at the end of the first year will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Special Requirements for the M.A.S. Degree

The M.A.S. in Global Affairs requires one year of graduate study at Yale. To complete the degree, students must pass eight courses in one year of full-time study. Courses are chosen in consultation with the director of graduate studies (DGS) at the start of each term. The program of study is customized to a student’s individual academic and professional goals.

Special Requirements for the M.A. Joint-Degree Programs

Joint-degree candidates must fulfill all of the requirements of both programs in which they are enrolled before receiving either degree. Joint-degree students must take at least twelve graduate-level courses in Arts and Sciences departments or in professional schools other than the one granting the joint degree toward the Global Affairs program requirements. Three of these will be GLBL 801, 802, and 803, though the DGS may waive a portion of the Core for a joint-degree candidate. Two of the twelve courses may be language courses. Under no circumstances will students be allowed a Global Affairs concentration in the functional area in which they will be receiving a joint degree.

Applicants to the joint-degree programs must apply separately, by the appropriate deadline, to the Graduate School for the Global Affairs M.A. program and to the professional school involved. Decisions on admissions and fellowship support are made independently by each school. Students are encouraged to apply to both programs simultaneously. They may also apply during their first year at Yale to the second program for a joint degree. If accepted into the new program, they must receive approval for credit allocation upon registration from both degree programs.

For more information, visit http://jackson.yale.edu/academics, e-mail jackson.institute@yale.edu, or call 203.432.3418.

Courses

GLBL 504bU, International Economics Peter Schott

Introduction to conceptual tools useful for understanding the strategic choices made by countries, firms, and unions in a globalized world. Prerequisite: two terms of introductory economics.

GLBL 529a/CDE 585a/LAW 20568, Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights Alice Miller

This course explores the application of human rights perspectives and practices to issues in regard to sexuality and health. Through reading, interactive discussion, paper presentation, and occasional outside speakers, students learn the tools and implications of applying rights and law to a range of sexuality and health-related topics. The overall goal is twofold: to engage students in the world of global sexual health and rights policy making as a field of social justice and public health action; and to introduce them to conceptual tools that can inform advocacy and policy formation and evaluation. Class participation, short reaction papers, and a final paper required. TH 9:25–11:15

GLBL 530a, Human Trafficking in the Global Context William Casey King

Human trafficking has been described as the largest human rights violation in the history of mankind. It is the third-largest criminal activity in the world (after drug smuggling and arms dealing). The estimated twenty-seven million enslaved individuals represent the highest number of slaves in human history. This course applies both a historical and contemporary context on slavery and anti-slavery and quantitative analysis to study the challenges confronting law enforcement and diplomatic agencies around the world. Questions students address include: How effective are the current methods for tracking and prosecuting human trafficking? What laws and/or policy changes could be enacted to eradicate human trafficking? How is the problem understood in different ways throughout the world? What is the role of the Internet and dark web in human trafficking? How can data inform anti-human trafficking efforts, and what is the limit of data? What should the role of the United States be in combatting human trafficking? What are other countries doing to confront the issue, and do they understand the problem in similar terms? Guest speakers from global NGOs, the Department of Homeland Security, survivors of human trafficking, policy makers, and anti-slavery activists.

GLBL 543b/MGT 672b, Practicum in Data Analysis Using Stata Justin Thomas

This course provides students with practical hands-on instruction in the analysis of survey data using the statistical package Stata. It serves as a bridge between the theory of statistics/econometrics and the practice of social science research. Throughout the term students learn to investigate a variety of policy and management issues using data from the United States as well as several developing countries. The course assumes no prior knowledge of the statistical package Stata. Prerequisites: graduate course in statistics and permission of the instructor.

GLBL 554aU, Violence: State and Society Matthew Kocher

The course examines violence that occurs mainly within the territory of sovereign states. We focus on violence as an object of study in its own right. For the most part, we look at violence as a dependent variable, though in some instances it functioned as an independent variable, a mechanism, or an equilibrium. We ask why violence happens, how it “works” or fails to work, why it takes place in some locations and not others, why violence takes specific forms (e.g., insurgency, terrorism, mass killing), what explains its magnitude (the number of victims), and what explains targeting (the type or identity of victims). Special attention to connecting theoretical literatures in the social sciences with policy-relevant debates in government and nongovernmental service.

GLBL 555b/PLSC 665bU, Causes of War Allan Dafoe

Examination of social, symbolic, and psychological aspects of international relations, with emphasis on the roles of perception and reputation in militarized conflict. Topics include deterrence, honor, prestige, signaling, audience costs, and international law. Rationalist, psychological, and cultural perspectives. Some attention to research design.

GLBL 567a/CDE 543a/EMD 543a, Global Aspects of Food and Nutrition  Debbie Humphries

The course presents a core topic in global health and development that is at the intersection of science, society, and policy. The course familiarizes students with leading approaches to analyzing the causes of malnutrition in countries around the world and to designing and evaluating nutrition interventions. It covers micronutrient and macronutrient deficiencies; approaches to reducing malnutrition; the cultural, economic, environmental, agricultural, and policy context within which malnutrition exists; and the relationships between common infections and nutritional status.

GLBL 569a/EHS 537a/EMD 537a, Water, Sanitation, and Global Health Ying Chen, Elsio Wunder

Water is essential for life, and yet unsafe water poses threats to human health globally, from the poorest to the wealthiest countries. More than two billion people around the world lack access to clean, safe drinking water, hygiene, and sanitation (WASH). This course focuses on the role of water in human health from a public health perspective. The course provides a broad overview of the important relationships between water quality, human health, and the global burden of waterborne diseases. It discusses the basics of water compartments and the health effects from exposures to pathogenic microbes and toxic chemicals in drinking water. It also covers different sanitation solutions to improve water quality and disease prevention and discusses future challenges and the need for intervention strategies in the new millennium.

GLBL 618aU/MGT 911a, The Next China Stephen Roach

Born out of necessity in the post-Cultural Revolution chaos of the late 1970s, modern China is about reforms, opening up, and transition. The Next China will be driven by the transition from an export- and investment-led development model to a pro-consumption model. China’s new model could unmask a dual identity crisis—underscored by China’s need to embrace political reform and the West’s long-standing misperceptions about China. Prerequisite: basic undergraduate macroeconomics. MW 10:30–11:20, 1 HTBA

GLBL 627b, Complex Emergencies: The Case of South Sudan Unni Karunakara

This seminar is designed to provide an understanding of complex emergencies. Using South Sudan as a case, we examine a long-standing humanitarian context and discuss the impact of history, politics, economics, and the environment on human security and suffering.

GLBL 693bU, U.S.-Russian Relations since the End of the Cold War  Thomas Graham

Examination of the factors—political, socioeconomic, and ideological—that have shaped U.S. and Russian relations since the end of the Cold War and how each country constructs relations with the other to advance its own national interests. Topics include specific issues in bilateral relations, including arms control, counterterrorism, energy, and regional affairs.

GLBL 695aU, Multilateral Institutions and U.S. Policy Rosemary DiCarlo

The multilateral system developed after the Second World War has served as the foundation for peace and prosperity for seventy years. Today’s threats are, however, no longer limited to cross-border conflicts between states but increasingly involve actions by non-state actors, conflicts within states, and global issues. This course examines the relevance of these institutions to meeting these challenges and to addressing U.S. foreign policy interests. It also explores the relations among existing and emerging powers and regional groupings.

GLBL 790b, Leadership Stanley McChrystal

This course examines the practical execution of leadership in today’s environment. Using a combination of historical case studies and recent events, we review how dramatic changes in technology, society, politics, media, and globalization have increased the complexity of the tasks facing modern leaders. Although the course includes the military aspects of leadership, the overall objective is to study leadership in a wider context, identifying the common factors shared by politics, business, education, warfare, and other fields. Specific topics include the changing leadership environment; the role of the leader; driving change; making difficult decisions; dealing with risk; coping with failure; navigating politics; and the effect of modern media. Application and course dates at http://jackson.yale.edu/glbl-790-leadership-seminar-application.

GLBL 791b, Moral Dilemmas in Humanitarian Action Unni Karunakara

This course discusses cases that examine ethical and moral dilemmas in the delivery of humanitarian assistance at the organizational, operational and individual levels.

GLBL 799a or b, Independent Project

By arrangement with Jackson Institute Senior Fellows.

GLBL 801a, Economics: Principles and Applications James Levinsohn, Zack Cooper

This course deals with the application of basic microeconomic analysis to public policy issues. The principal goal is to teach students the process of economic reasoning and how to apply that reasoning to policy issues in the real world. The course covers the basic topics in microeconomic theory: consumer theory, production theory, market models from competition to monopoly, theories of labor and capital markets, and models of externalities and other common market failures. Some calculus will be used without apology along with a great deal of algebra and graphical analysis.

GLBL 802a, Applied Methods of Analysis Lloyd Grieger

The course focuses on useful analytical approaches in public policy and the social sciences. The first part of the course focuses on mathematical skills. The second part focuses on methods for analyzing empirical data and builds on the mathematical skills from the first part of the course. Special focus is devoted to developing the skills necessary to synthesize and evaluate empirical evidence from the social sciences. Students leave the class with an applied understanding of how quantitative methods are used as tools for analysis in public affairs.

GLBL 803a, History of the Present Timothy Snyder

The first half of the course presents some of the major diplomatic (and sometimes military) confrontations of the twentieth century, beginning with the First Balkan War, including the breakdowns of the late 1930s and progressing through the end of the Cold War. The second half introduces the history of Ukraine and closes with a case study of the Russian invasion of Ukraine’s south and east as the end of the post-cold war order. In both parts emphasis is placed upon a close reading of primary documents and upon the reconstruction of possible alternatives.

GLBL 823aU/ANTH 583aU, Health Disparities and Health Equity: Biocultural Perspectives Catherine Panter-Brick

A biocultural perspective on debates in medical anthropology and global health that focus on health disparities and equity. The intersection of biological and cultural issues in matters of health research and intervention. Application of theoretical frameworks to case studies in global health inequality. W 3:30–5:20

GLBL 883b, Challenges to Security and Stability in Central and Eastern Europe  Yuriy Sergeyev

This course examines the geopolitical, political, military, socioeconomic, and ideological factors that are challenging security and stability in the region of Central and Eastern Europe after collapse of the USSR. The goal is to give students a broad understanding of the reasons for the worsening security and stability in the region, particularly the Baltic states, Visegrad states, and GUAM member states, and to model further potential developments. The influence of the global players—United States, European Union, Russia—on the security situation in the region is considered.

GLBL 885b, World Order Charles Hill

International peace and security as humanity’s primary moral-philosophical problem, reflected in works beyond the policy realm, from Confucius to Kant, Hegel, Wittgenstein, and Niebuhr. Early writings of Kissinger and his diplomatic papers now at Yale provide case studies. Open to graduate and undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

GLBL 910a/HIST 980a, Genocide in History and Theory Benedict Kiernan

Comparative research and analysis of genocidal occurrences around the world from ancient times to the present; theories and case studies; an interregional, interdisciplinary perspective. Readings and discussion, guest speakers, research paper. TH 1:30–3:20

GLBL 999a or b, Directed Reading

By arrangement with faculty.

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History

240 Hall of Graduate Studies, 203.432.1366

http://history.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Naomi Lamoreaux

Director of Graduate Studies

Daniel Botsman (236 HGS, 203.432.1361)

Professors Jean-Christophe Agnew, Abbas Amanat, Ned Blackhawk, David Blight, Daniel Botsman, Paul Bushkovitch, George Chauncey (on leave [Sp]), Henry Cowles, Stephen Davis, Carolyn Dean (on leave), Fabian Drixler, Carlos Eire, Paul Freedman, Joanne Freeman (on leave [Sp]), John Gaddis (on leave [F]), Beverly Gage (on leave [Sp]), Glenda Gilmore (on leave [Sp]), Bruce Gordon, Valerie Hansen (on leave [F]), Robert Harms, Jonathan Holloway, Matthew Jacobson (on leave), Gilbert Joseph (on leave [Sp]), Paul Kennedy, Benedict Kiernan (on leave [Sp]), Jennifer Klein, Naomi Lamoreaux (on leave [F]), Noel Lenski (on leave [F]), Kathryn Lofton, Mary Lui, J.G. Manning (on leave), Ivan Marcus, John Merriman, Joanne Meyerowitz, Alan Mikhail, Peter Perdue (on leave [Sp]), Steven Pincus, Stephen Pitti, Sophia Rosenfeld, Paul Sabin, Lamin Sanneh, Stuart Schwartz, Frank Snowden, Timothy Snyder, David Sorkin, Harry Stout (on leave [Sp]), Francesca Trivellato (on leave), John Harley Warner, Anders Winroth, John Witt, Keith Wrightson

Associate Professors Paola Bertucci, Crystal Feimster, Daniel Magaziner, Naomi Rogers, Edward Rugemer, Marci Shore, Eliyahu Stern

Assistant Professors Jennifer Allen, Rosie Bsheer (on leave), Rohit De (on leave), Marcela Echeverri, Anne Eller, Denise Ho, Isaac Nakhimovsky, Joanna Radin, William Rankin, Jenifer Van Vleck

Lecturers* Adel Allouche, Annping Chin (Senior Lecturer), Ivano Dal Prete, Chitra Ramalingam, Stuart Semmel (Senior Lecturer)

*For a complete list of lecturers, see the undergraduate bulletin, Yale College Programs of Study.

Fields of Study

Fields include ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern Europe (including Britain, Russia, and Eastern Europe), United States, Latin America, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Middle East, Africa, Jewish history; and diplomatic, environmental, ethnic, intellectual, labor, military, political, religious, social, and women’s history, as well as the history of science and medicine (see the section in this bulletin on the History of Science and Medicine).

Special Admissions Requirements

The deadline for submission of the application for the History graduate program is December 15.

The department requires a short book review (maximum 1,000 words) to accompany the application. It should cover the book that has most shaped the applicant’s understanding of the kind of work he or she would like to do as a historian.

In addition, the department requires submission of an academic writing sample of not more than 25 pages, double spaced. Normally, the writing sample should be based on research in primary source materials.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Language Requirements

All students must pass examinations in at least one foreign language by the end of the first year. Students are urged to do everything in their power to acquire adequate linguistic training before they enter Yale and should at a minimum be prepared to be examined in at least one language upon arrival. Typical language requirements for major subfields are as follows:

African Either (1) French and German or Portuguese or Dutch-Afrikaans; or (2) French or German or Portuguese and Arabic; or (3) French or German or Portuguese or Dutch-Afrikaans and an African language approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS) and the faculty adviser.

American One language relevant to the student’s research interests.

Ancient German, French, or Italian and two ancient languages, one of which must be Greek or Latin and the second of which can be either the second classical language or another ancient language (e.g., Hebrew, Aramaic/Syriac, Demotic, Coptic, Classical Armenian, Sanskrit).

Chinese Chinese and Japanese; additional languages like French, Russian, or German may be necessary for certain dissertation topics.

East European The language of the country of the student’s concentration plus two of the following: French, German, Russian, or an approved substitution.

Global/International Two languages to be determined by the DGS in consultation with the adviser.

Japanese Japanese and French or German; Chinese may be necessary for certain fields of Japanese history.

Jewish Modern Hebrew and German, and additional languages such as Latin, Arabic, Yiddish, Russian, or Polish, as required by the student’s areas of specialization.

Latin American Spanish, Portuguese, and French.

Medieval French, German, and Latin.

Middle East Arabic, Persian, or Turkish (or modern Hebrew, depending on area of research) and a major European research language (French, German, Russian, or an approved substitute).

Modern Western European (including British) French and German; substitutions are permitted with the approval of the DGS.

Russian Russian plus French or German with other languages as required.

Southeast Asian Choice of Dutch, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Sanskrit, or Arabic, plus one or more Southeast Asian language (e.g., Bahasa Indonesian, Burmese, Khmer, Lao, Malay, Tagalog, Thai, Tetum, or Vietnamese). In certain cases, Ph.D. dissertation research on Southeast Asia may also require knowledge of a regional or local language, e.g., Balinese or Cham.

Foreign students whose native language is not English may receive permission during their first year to hand in some written work in their own language. Since, however, the dissertation must be in English, they are advised to bring their writing skills up to the necessary level at the earliest opportunity.

Additional Requirements

These new regulations will be observed by students admitted in 2013 and following years. Students admitted earlier may opt to observe either the new or the old regulations.

During the first year of study, students normally take six term courses, including Approaching History (HIST 500). During the second year of study, they may opt to take four to six term courses, with the approval of their adviser and the DGS. Students who plan to apply for outside grants at the beginning of their third year are recommended to take the Prospectus Tutorial (HIST 995) during their second year, and it is required for students in European history. The tutorial should result in a full draft of the dissertation prospectus. The ten courses taken during the first two years should normally include at least six chosen from those offered by the department. Students must achieve Honors in at least two courses in the first year, and Honors in at least four courses by the end of the second year, with a High Pass average overall. Courses graded in the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory mode count toward the course work requirement but do not count toward the Honors requirement.

Two of the ten courses must be research seminars in which the student produces an original research paper from primary sources. The Prospectus Tutorial does not count as a research seminar. All graduate students, regardless of field, will be required to take two seminar courses in a time period other than their period of specialty.

Students in their second year should choose their courses so that at least one course will prepare them for a comprehensive examination field in their third year. Some fields offer reading seminars specifically designed to help prepare students for examination; others encourage students to sign up for examination tutorials (HIST 994) with one of their examiners.

By the end of their fifth term, at the latest, students are expected to take comprehensive examinations. Students will have a choice of selecting three or four fields of concentration: a major field and either two or three minor fields. The examination must contain one minor field that deals 50 percent or more with the historiography of a region of the world other than the area of the student’s major field. The examination will have a written component that will be completed before the oral component. For their major field, students will write a historiographical essay of maximum 8,000 words. For each of the minor fields, the student will prepare a syllabus for an undergraduate lecture class in the field. All of these are to be written over the course of the examination preparation process and will be due on a definite, uniform date toward the end of the students’ fifth term, typically on the Friday before Thanksgiving break (or on a corresponding date in the spring term). The oral examination examines the students on their fields and will, additionally, include discussion of the materials produced for the written component of the examination. If the student selects the four-field option, the major field will be examined for thirty minutes. If the student selects the three-field option, the major field will be examined for sixty minutes and each minor field for thirty minutes.

By the end of their sixth term, at the latest, students are expected to hold a prospectus colloquium, but those who took the Prospectus tutorial (HIST 995) during their second year are encouraged to hold the colloquium at the beginning of their third year. The prospectus colloquium offers students an opportunity to discuss the dissertation prospectus with their dissertation committee in order to gain the committee’s advice on the research and writing of the dissertation and its approval for the project. The dissertation prospectus provides the basis of grant proposals.

Completion of ten term courses (including HIST 500), the language requirements of the relevant field, the comprehensive examinations, and the prospectus colloquium will qualify a student for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D., which must take place by the end of the third year of study.

It is also possible for students who have completed extensive graduate work prior to entering the Yale Ph.D. program to complete course work sooner. Students may petition for course waivers based on previous graduate work (up to three term courses) only after successful completion of the first year.

Students normally serve as teaching fellows during four terms to acquire professional training. Ordinarily, students teach in their third and fourth years. During their first term of teaching, students must attend training sessions run by the Graduate Teaching Center and work with the associate director of graduate studies to discuss any matters of concern. Students may teach, normally in their fourth term of teaching, as seminar fellows, teaching an undergraduate seminar in conjunction with a faculty member, if such positions are available.

By the end of their ninth term, students are required to submit a chapter of their dissertation to the dissertation committee. This chapter will then be discussed with the student by the committee, in a chapter conference, to give the student additional advice and counsel on the progress of the dissertation. This conference is designed to be an extension of the conversation begun in the prospectus colloquium and is not intended as a defense: its aim is to give students early feedback on the research, argument, and style of the first writing accomplished on the dissertation. No less than one month before students plan to submit their dissertations, a relatively polished full draft of the dissertation should be discussed with the student by the dissertation committee, in a dissertation defense of one to two hours, to give the students additional advice and counsel on completing the dissertation or on turning it into a book, as appropriate. Students are required to submit the draft to their committee in sufficient time for the committee to be able to read it. This defense is designed to give students advice on the overall arguments and the final shape of the dissertation or book, and to leave time for adjustments coming out of the discussion.

The fellowship package offered to Ph.D. students normally includes twelve months of University Dissertation Fellowship (UDF), which finances a full year of research and writing without any teaching duties. Students may choose to take the UDF at any point after they have advanced to candidacy and before the end of their sixth year. Students are prohibited from teaching when they are on the UDF. The department strongly recommends that students apply for a UDF only after completing the first chapter conference and that they have drafted at least two chapters before starting the fellowship.

Students who have not submitted the dissertation by the end of the sixth year need not register in order to submit. If, however, students wish to register for a seventh year for good academic reasons, they may petition the Graduate School for extended registration. The petition, delivered through the History DGS, will explain the academic reasons for the request. Only students who have completed the first chapter conference will be considered for extended registration.

Evaluation of First- and Second-Year Graduate Students

At the end of each term, the DGS will ask faculty members whether they have serious concerns about the academic progress of any first- or second-year students in the Ph.D. program. Faculty members who have such concerns will provide written feedback to the DGS at his or her request. The DGS will use his or her discretion to ensure that feedback is provided to any students about whom there are concerns in a clear and effective manner. We expect such concerns to be rare.

Toward the end of the academic year, the History faculty will hold a special meeting to review each first- and second-year student in the program. The purpose of the meeting is to assess students’ academic progress. In order for second-year students to proceed to the third year, they must demonstrate through written work, classroom performance, and participation in departmental activities that they have the ability to: (a) speak and write clearly; (b) conduct independent research at a high level; and (c) develop coherent scholarly arguments. A faculty vote will be taken at the conclusion of the review meeting to decide whether each second-year student may stay in the program. In the unusual case that a majority of faculty present and voting determine that a student may not continue, the student will be informed in writing and withdrawn from the program. The review meeting must be a full faculty meeting, but faculty members with no knowledge of the students under review may abstain from the vote, and their abstentions will not count in the total. Those members of the faculty who have worked with or know the students being evaluated are required to attend. In the event that any necessary faculty members absolutely cannot be present, they may send their views in writing to the DGS, who will read them at the meeting.

Once a student has been informed that he or she is to be dismissed from the program, the student may submit a formal letter of appeal within two weeks, accompanied by supporting documentation (research or other scholarly work), to the Graduate Advisory Committee. The Graduate Advisory Committee will render a final decision within two weeks of receipt of the appeal. Any members of the Graduate Advisory Committee who have worked directly with the student will recuse themselves from the final vote on the case.

Combined Ph.D. Programs

History and Classics

The Department of History also offers, in conjunction with the Department of Classics, a combined Ph.D. in History and Classics, with a concentration in Ancient History. For further details, see Classics.

History and African American Studies

The Department of History also offers, in conjunction with the Department of African American Studies, a combined Ph.D. in History and African American Studies. For further details, see African American Studies.

History and Renaissance Studies

The Department of History also offers, in conjunction with the Renaissance Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in History and Renaissance Studies. For further details, see Renaissance Studies.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. Students who have completed all requirements for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. may receive the M.Phil. degree. Additionally, students in History are eligible to pursue a supplemental M.Phil. degree in Medieval Studies. For further details, see Medieval Studies.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program may qualify for the M.A. degree upon completion of a minimum of seven graduate term courses at Yale, of which two must have earned Honors grades and the other five courses must average High Pass overall. Students must also pass an examination in one foreign language. A student in the American Studies program who wishes to obtain an M.A. in History, rather than an M.A. in American Studies, must include in the courses completed at least two research seminars in the History department.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program For this terminal master’s degree, students must pass seven term courses, four of which must be in History; substantial written work must be submitted in conjunction with at least two of these courses, and Honors grades are expected in two courses, with a High Pass average overall. Of the seven required courses, one should be a language or relevant technological language course. An undergraduate language course, statistics course, or other applicable course in a technological “language” counts for credit toward the graduate degree. All students in this program must pass an examination in one foreign language. Financial aid is not available for this program.

More information is available on the department’s Web site, http://history.yale.edu.

Courses

HIST 500a, Approaching History: Problems, Methods, and Theory  Daniel Botsman, Jennifer Klein

An introduction to the professional study of history, which offers new doctoral students an opportunity to explore (and learn from each other about) the diversity of the field, while also addressing issues of shared concern and importance for the future of the discipline. By the end of the term participants have been exposed to some of the key methodological and theoretical approaches historians have developed for studying different time periods, places, and aspects of the human past. Required of all first-year doctoral students. T 9:25–11:15

HIST 502b/ANTH 531b/ARCG 531b/CLSS 815b/CPLT 547b/JDST 653b/NELC 533b/RLST 803b, Fakes, Forgeries, and the Making of Antiquity Eckart Frahm, Irene Peirano Garrison

A comparative exploration of notions of forgery and authenticity in the ancient and premodern world, in a variety of civilizations (ancient Greece, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, China, India, etc.) and different political, religious, literary, and artistic contexts. Emphasis is also placed on the pivotal role played by the “authentic” in the modern era in disciplines such as philology and aesthetics, the manipulative uses of ancient history for purposes of modern nation building and identity formation, copies and reconstructions of ancient artifacts, and the role of forgeries in today’s antiquities trade. TH 2:30–4:30

HIST 533a/MDVL 599a, The Twelfth Century Paul Freedman

The growth of European institutions and intellectual life in the twelfth century. Particular emphasis on Anglo-American historiography of the period beginning with Charles Homer Haskins’s 1927 study, The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century. TH 1:30–3:20

HIST 540b, Introduction to Research in Medieval History Anders Winroth

The seminar provides an introduction to research in medieval European history: often-used source genres, methods, and research tools. We focus on working with primary sources in original languages, occasionally in their original manuscript and early printed form. A working knowledge of a medieval language is, therefore, desirable. In 2017 the seminar focuses on the Bible in the Middle Ages. Yale is particularly fortunate in that the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library possesses much relevant material, including medieval manuscripts and early printed bibles. We focus both on the text of the Bible and on how it was understood by medieval interpreters. M 1:30–3:20

HIST 577a/AFAM 558a/AMST 688a/RLST 688a/WGSS 695a, Historicizing Religion Kathryn Lofton

What does it mean to offer a history of religion? How is a history of religion distinct from, or overlapping with, the history of race or gender? This course takes as its central subject a key methodological problem of modernity, namely the task to offer material accounts for human perception, social organization, and epistemological vantage. We read new historical monographs and relevant classic theories that consider what religion is, how its categorization is like and unlike other concepts for human distinction, and why it became something in modernity requiring historical diagnosis. Included in our topical survey are examinations of secularization and disenchantment; myth and narrative; church history and hagiography; objectivity and positivism; world religions and comparative religions; Orientalism and colonialism; sectarianism and secularism. Works read include Elizabeth A. Clark, History, Theory, Text: Historians and the Linguistic Turn; Sylvester Johnson, African American Religions, 1500–2000: Colonialism, Democracy, and Freedom; and Suzanne Marchand, German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race, and Scholarship. M 9:25–11:15

HIST 578b/RLST 677b, The Catholic Reformation Carlos Eire

Reading and discussion of scholarship on the Catholic Reformation and of key primary texts written between 1500 and 1600. W 3:30–5:20

HIST 580a/REL 764a/RLST 681a, Martin Luther and the Reformation Carlos Eire, Bruce Gordon

Readings in key texts by Martin Luther and his contemporaries, as well as in classic and recent scholarship on his life, work, and legacy. M 3:30–5:20

HIST 587bU/JDST 793bU/RLST 799bU, Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought  Eliyahu Stern

An overview of Jewish philosophical trends, movements, and thinkers from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century. Topics include enlightenment, historicism, socialism, secularism, religious radicalism, and Zionism. MW 2:30–3:20, 1 HTBA

HIST 590bU/JDST 764bU/RLST 777bU, Jews in Muslim Lands from the Seventh through the Sixteenth Century Ivan Marcus

Introduction to Jewish culture and society in Muslim lands from the Prophet Muhammad to Suleiman the Magnificent. Topics include Islam and Judaism; Jerusalem as a holy site; rabbinic leadership and literature in Baghdad; Jewish courtiers, poets, and philosophers in Muslim Spain; and the Jews in the Ottoman Empire. TTH 11:35–12:50

HIST 596aU/JDST 761aU/RLST 773aU, Jewish History and Thought to Early Modern Times Ivan Marcus

A broad introduction to the history of the Jews from biblical beginnings until the European Reformation and the Ottoman Empire. Focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationships among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Jewish society and culture in its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval settings. TTH 11:35–12:50

HIST 598b/JDST 846b/RLST 771b, Jewish Emancipation in the Twentieth Century  David Sorkin

Conventional wisdom has it that the process of “Jewish emancipation,” or the acquisition of citizenship and equality, culminated with the Russian Revolution of 1917 or the minority rights treaties of the early 1920s. In fact, emancipation did not cease. In the 1930s and 1940s right-wing, fascist, and Nazi governments across Europe abrogated Jews’ citizenship. Postwar governments restored citizenship, sometimes reluctantly, sometimes belatedly, sometimes inconsistently. The controversies over reparations and the restoration of property that continue today belong to this process as well. The establishment of Israel with its own specific concept of citizenship was yet another aspect. Finally, the laws that prohibited discrimination in schools, housing, employment, and secondary associations in the 1950s–1970s were an installment in creating equality for Jews in the United States. This seminar casts its nets broadly to study the extant scholarship on “Jewish emancipation” in the twentieth century. TH 3:30–5:20

HIST 601b/JDST 790b/RLST 776b, Jewish History, Thought, and Narratives in Medieval Societies Ivan Marcus

Research seminar that focuses on the two medieval Jewish subcultures of Ashkenaz (northern Christian Europe) and Sefarad (mainly Muslim and Christian Spain). TH 9:25–11:15

HIST 615a, The Enlightenment: Approaches to the Intellectual and Cultural History of the Eighteenth Century Sophia Rosenfeld

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical, methodological, and historiographical questions involved in the study of the Enlightenment as a historical phenomenon. Among the topics to be considered are the geography, social actors, and spaces of Enlightenment; the history of books and reading; the relationship between ideas and revolutions; and the nature and legacy of Enlightenment thinking on subjects ranging from the nature of God to slavery and colonialism. Readings include a sampling of important primary sources (i.e., Kant, Rousseau, Hume, Wollstonecraft, Franklin), but the focus is primarily on the evolution in historians’ responses to the question “What is Enlightenment?” W 9:25–11:15

HIST 618b, Inventing Federalism in the Age of the American Revolution  Steven Pincus, Isaac Nakhimovsky

This research seminar explores the emergence of federalism in early modern Europe and America. The course asks students to consider federalism in relation to composite monarchies, republics, empires, and confederations, and to reexamine the historiography of the nation-state. The course explores these modes of sovereignty not only on their own but also as modes of addressing new problems of political economy, in particular the relationship between the history of capitalism and institutional arrangements. These issues are then related to contemporary problems of governance—such as the European Union—since the nineteenth century. T 9:25–11:15

HIST 619a, Readings in the Social and Economic History of Britain, 1500–1750  Keith Wrightson

Reading and discussion of central works in the social and cultural history of the period. The class begins with the fundamental issues of social structure and population dynamics. Thereafter the weekly agenda is decided in consultation, selecting from such topics as urbanization; poverty; household and family relationships; gender and sexuality; community structures; crime and the law; protest and rebellion; education, literacy, and print culture; material culture; popular religion; witchcraft; national identities; agrarian custom and change; history and social memory. W 9:25–11:15

HIST 628b, Microhistories Keith Wrightson

A research seminar. The first weeks are devoted to reading and discussing a number of outstanding microhistorical studies of individuals, families, communities, incidents, and processes, principally (though not exclusively) drawn from the literature on the early modern period. Particular attention is paid to questions of sources and their use. Thereafter members of the class undertake individual microhistorical studies on subjects of their choice and present work-in-progress papers to the seminar. W 9:25–11:15

HIST 658b, Utopia and Counterculture in Postwar Germany Jennifer Allen

This reading seminar explores the themes of utopia and counterculture in postwar Germany. With an emphasis on recent scholarship, we investigate the ideals that guided how Germans—East and West—rebuilt politics, society, and culture after the Second World War. The seminar covers topics like youth culture; Americanization; the Student Movement and new politics of the left; the New Social movements, including the women’s movement, environmental movement, and peace movement; and the efforts to redefine national identity in the wake of reunification. W 9:25–11:15

HIST 670b/CPLT 870b/WGSS 860b, Gender Theories and Their Politics  Moira Fradinger

A historical survey of the intellectual tradition that takes for its object the interrogation and theorization of systems of power whereby inequality is associated with gender, sex, and sexuality. These categories are studied in terms of the politics of location that created them: we read from the corpus written in the context of movements such as classical liberal and radical feminism, anarchism, and socialism; the psychoanalytic international community; or institutional academic settings such as the fields of film studies, women’s studies, and gay and lesbian studies. Authors include Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Flora Tristán, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Maria Mies, Heidi Hartmann, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Hortense Spillers, Gayle Rubin, Jacqueline Rose, Juliet Mitchell, Eve K. Sedgwick, Luce Irigaray, Monique Wittig, Teresa de Lauretis, Rosi Braidotti, Luisa Muraro, Adriana Cavarero, Chandra Mohanty, Gloria Anzaldúa, Nira Yuval-Davis, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, and Maxine Molyneux. W 7–9

HIST 683b, Global History of Eastern Europe Timothy Snyder

A thematic survey of major issues in modern east European history, with emphasis on recent historiography. A reading course with multiple brief writing assignments. TH 9:25–11:15

HIST 687a, Russia, the USSR, and the World, 1855–1945 Paul Bushkovitch

Political and economic relations of Russia/Soviet Union with Europe, the United States, and Asia from tsarism to socialism. W 1:30–3:20

HIST 702a/AMST 802a, Readings in Early National America Joanne Freeman

An introduction to the early national period and its scholarship, exploring major themes such as nationalism, national identity, the influence of the frontier, the structure of society, questions of race and gender, and the evolution of political cultures. T 1:30–3:20

HIST 703a/AMST 803a, Research in Early National America Joanne Freeman

A research seminar focused on the early national period of American history, broadly defined. Early weeks familiarize students with sources from the period and discuss research and writing strategies. Students produce a publishable article grounded in primary materials. W 9:25–11:15

HIST 706a/LAW 20641, Political Economy, Institutions, and Property in the Age of the American Revolution Steven Pincus, Claire Priest

A new generation of scholarship emphasizes the importance of political economy and institution building as central themes in the American founding era through the lens of institutions, property, and debates over political economy. The course covers institutions central to understanding the eighteenth-century political economy such as slavery, immigration, banking, imperial law, comparative constitutional development, courts, and credit markets. Readings and discussions focus on both British imperial and early American contexts. Course grade is based primarily on a research paper. W 1:10–3

HIST 708b/AFAM 705b/AMST 708b/ENGL 708b/HSHM 729b, The History of Race  Greta LaFleur

This course offers a broad survey of the history of racial science and racialist thinking in the Atlantic world from the early modern period through the late nineteenth century. Rather than attempting to detail the histories of specific racial formations (such as blackness or whiteness), the course tracks the intellectual history of the emergence of “race” as a specific category of human differentiation and traces a swath of its most muscular—and pernicious—permutations through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. W 1:30–3:20

HIST 711a/AFAM 738a/AMST 706a/WGSS 716a, Readings in African American Women’s History Crystal Feimster

The diversity of African American women’s lives from the colonial era through the late twentieth century. Using primary and secondary sources we explore the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that produced change and transformation in the lives of African American women. Through history, fiction, autobiography, art, religion, film, music, and cultural criticism we discuss and explore the construction of African American women’s activism and feminism; the racial politics of the body, beauty, and complexion; hetero- and same-sex sexualities; intraracial class relations; and the politics of identity, family, and work. M 1:30–3:20

HIST 715a/AFAM 764a/AMST 715a, Readings in Nineteenth-Century America  David Blight

The course explores recent trends and historiography on several problems through the middle of the nineteenth century: sectionalism, expansion; slavery and the Old South; northern society and reform movements; Civil War causation; the meaning of the Confederacy; why the North won the Civil War; the political, constitutional, and social meanings of emancipation and Reconstruction; violence in Reconstruction society; the relationships between social/cultural and military/political history; problems in historical memory; the tension between narrative and analytical history writing; and the ways in which race and gender have reshaped research and interpretive agendas. W 1:30–3:20

HIST 730a/AMST 801a, U.S. Intellectual Formations in the Twentieth Century  Jean-Christophe Agnew

This seminar introduces students to recent works on some of the more important intellectual movements in twentieth-century U.S. history and explores the widely different contextualist approaches that historians have taken toward them. Our first set of questions focuses on the intellectuals as a social type or formation: How did they mobilize themselves and others differently over the course of the century as the institutional ground shifted beneath their feet, the culture industries multiplied, and the communication revolution unfolded? How should we understand the real and imagined spaces that intellectuals fashioned for themselves and the impact of those geographies upon their identities and ideas? What effects have the changing forms of intellectual collaboration had on the genesis, refinement, and articulation of ideas in this country? Our second set of questions focuses on some of the ideas, ideologies, paradigms, “imaginaries,” and intellectual identities that took hold over the course of the century, with a view toward comparing the different visions in relation to one another and against the circumstances of their efflorescence. One short and one long paper. T 1:30–3:20

HIST 734b/AMST 780b, Class and Capitalism in Twentieth-Century United States  Jennifer Klein

Reading course on class formation, labor, and political economy in the twentieth-century United States; how regionalism, race, and class power shaped development of American capitalism. The course reconsiders the relationships between economic structure and American politics and political ideologies, and between global and domestic political economy. Readings include primary texts and secondary literature (social, intellectual, and political history; geography). W 3:30–5:20

HIST 744a/AMST 744a/F&ES 617a/HSHM 747a, Readings and Research in Energy History Paul Sabin

The history of energy in the United States and the world. Readings and discussion range widely across different forms of energy: animal power, biomass, and early hydropower; coal, oil, and atomic energy; and present-day hydraulic fracturing, wind, and solar. Themes include relations between energy producers and communities, including resistance to energy projects; cultural and social change associated with dominant energy regimes; labor struggles and environmental transformations; the global quest for oil; and changing national energy policies. We explore new approaches to writing and teaching the history of energy. Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor. M 1:30–3:20

HIST 746a/AMST 903aU, Introduction to Public Humanities Ryan Brasseaux

What is the relationship between knowledge produced in the university and the circulation of ideas among a broader public, between academic expertise on the one hand and nonprofessionalized ways of knowing and thinking on the other? What is possible? This seminar provides an introduction to various institutional relations and to the modes of inquiry, interpretation, and presentation by which practitioners in the humanities seek to invigorate the flow of information and ideas among a public more broadly conceived than the academy, its classrooms, and its exclusive readership of specialists. Topics include public history, museum studies, oral and community history, public art, documentary film and photography, public writing and educational outreach, the socially conscious performing arts, and fundraising. In addition to core readings and discussions, the seminar includes presentations by several practitioners who are currently engaged in different aspects of the Public Humanities. With the help of Yale faculty and affiliated institutions, participants collaborate in developing and executing a Public Humanities project of their own definition and design. Possibilities might include, but are not limited to, an exhibit or installation, a documentary, a set of walking tours, a Web site, a documents collection for use in public schools. Required for the M.A. with a concentration in Public Humanities.

HIST 750a/AFAM 802a/AMST 804a, Readings in African American History since 1865 Glenda Gilmore

Students read major secondary works alongside key primary sources on African American history from 1865 to the present. The course covers Reconstruction; the Jim Crow era; the Long Civil Rights Movement, including its classical phase; African American transnationalism; and urban, political, and labor history from the African American perspective. The course emphasizes gender and racial formation. Students read thematically within the course, make class presentations, and write a historiographical paper. W 1:30–3:20

HIST 752a/AMST 741a, Indians and Empires Ned Blackhawk

This course explores recent scholarship on Indian-imperial relations throughout North American colonial spheres from roughly 1500 to 1900. It examines indigenous responses to Spanish, Dutch, French, English, and lastly American and Canadian colonialism and interrogates commonplace periodization and geographic and conceptual approaches to American historiography. It concludes with an examination of American Indian political history, contextualizing it within larger assessments of Indian-imperial and Indian-state relations. T 7–8:50

HIST 757a/LAW 20678, Problems in Legal Historiography John Witt

Intensive readings seminar designed for students doing advanced work in legal history. The seminar surveys current trends in the theory of legal history, with an emphasis on the American experience and international law. Paper required. Enrollment limited to ten. Permission of the instructor required. M 7:10–9

HIST 761b/LAW 21063, American Legal History Claire Priest

This course examines the foundations of the American legal, political, and economic order from the colonial period through the early twentieth century. We analyze the emergence of American property law, slavery, women’s legal history, intellectual property, and corporate law as well as federalism, the Constitution, and judicial review. The course readings consist of contemporary sources, recently published works, and classics in the field. The course supports independent student research with a paper requirement. TTH 2:10–3:35

HIST 764a/AFAM 716a/AMST 910a, Working Group on Latina/o Studies I  Stephen Pitti, Alicia Schmidt Camacho

A continuous workshop for graduate students in American Studies, History, African American Studies, and related fields. This group devotes the fall term to intensive reading and discussion of important interdisciplinary texts in Latina/o studies. Students interested in participating should contact stephen.pitti@yale.edu. F 9:25–11:15

HIST 765b/AFAM 718b/AMST 911b, Working Group on Latina/o Studies II  Stephen Pitti, Alicia Schmidt Camacho

A continuous workshop for graduate students in American Studies, History, African American Studies, and related fields. The spring term focuses on the development of individual research projects and on public history work with the Smithsonian Museums and organizations in New Haven. Students interested in participating should contact stephen.pitti@yale.edu. F 9:25–11:15

HIST 768a/AMST 768a, Asian American History and Historiography Mary Lui

This reading and discussion seminar examines Asian American history through a selection of recently published texts and established works that have significantly shaped the field. Major topics include the racial formation of Asian Americans in U.S. culture, politics, and law; U.S. imperialism; U.S. capitalist development and Asian labor migration; and transnational and local ethnic community formations. The class considers both the political and academic roots of the field as well as its evolving relationship to “mainstream” American history. TH 9:25–11:15

HIST 775a/AMST 866a/WGSS 712a, Readings in the History of Sexuality  Joanne Meyerowitz

Selected topics in the history of sexuality. Emphasis on key theoretical works and recent historical literature. W 3:30-5:20

HIST 783a/AMST 717a, Readings in Transnational History Jenifer Van Vleck

Readings in historiography after the “transnational turn”—the project of writing and teaching history across national boundaries. Emphasis on methods, especially research strategies and interpretive frameworks. Topics of readings and discussions include empire, colonialism, and postcolonialism; nations and nationalisms; borders and borderlands; globalization; cultural transfer and hybridity; and transnational approaches to histories of race, gender, and sexuality. M 1:30–3:20

HIST 797a/AFAM 797a/AMST 797a, Atlantic Abolitions Marcela Echeverri, Edward Rugemer

This readings course explores the historiography on the century of abolition, when the new states of the Americas abolished racial slavery. Beginning with the first abolitions in the U.S. North during the 1780s, we consider the emergence and process of abolition throughout the Atlantic world, including the Caribbean, Spanish America, and Brazil, through the 1880s. TH 9:25–11:15

HIST 800b/HSAR 746b/MDVL 565b, Circa 1000 Valerie Hansen, Mary Miller, Anders Winroth

The world in the year 1000, when the different regions of the world participated in complex networks. Archaeological excavations reveal that the Vikings reached L’Anse aux Meadows, Canada, at roughly the same time that the Kitan people defeated China’s Song dynasty and established a powerful empire stretching across the grasslands of Eurasia. Viking chieftains donned Chinese silks while Chinese princesses treasured Baltic amber among their jewelry. In what is now the American Southwest, the people of Chaco Canyon feasted on tropical chocolate, while the lords of Chichen Itza wore New Mexican turquoise—yet never knew the Huari lords of the central Andes. In this seminar, students read interpretative texts based on archaeology and primary sources, prepare projects in teams, work with material culture, and develop skills of cross-cultural analysis. Mandatory field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on Saturday, January 21. M 3:30–5:20

HIST 807a/AMST 650a, Resistance, Rebellion, and Survival Strategies in Modern Latin America Gilbert Joseph

An interdisciplinary examination of new conceptual and methodological approaches to such phenomena as peasants in revolution, millenarianism, “banditry,” refugee movements, and transnational migration. F 1:30–3:20

HIST 810a, Introduction to Brazilian History Stuart Schwartz

An introduction to the historical problems and historiography of Brazil. Readings of basic books in the field and discussion of the historiographical traditions. Basic readings are in English but students are encouraged to use Portuguese.

HIST 821b, A Greater Caribbean: New Approaches to Caribbean History Anne Eller

This course is taught in conjunction with a course of the same title and scope at Cornell University with Professor Ernesto Bassi. We engage with new work emerging about the Greater Caribbean in the context of Latin America, the African diaspora, Atlantic history, global history, comparative emancipation from chattel slavery, and the study of global revolutions. Students make in-class presentations that locate these titles in a deeper historiography with classic texts. This course crosses imperial boundaries of archives and historiography in order to consider the intersecting allegiances, identities, itineraries, and diaspora of peoples, in local, hemispheric, and global context. Some central questions include: What is the lived geography of the Caribbean at different moments, and how does using different geographic and temporary frameworks help approach the region’s history? What role did people living in this amorphously demarcated region play in major historical transformations of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? How did the varied but interconnected processes of Caribbean emancipation impact economic and political systems throughout the Atlantic and beyond? The course concludes with a mini-conference in which students of both universities come together to discuss the state of the field and future directions in Caribbean history. W 9:25–11:15

HIST 830b/AFST 830b, Cities, Media, and Culture in Twentieth-Century Africa  Daniel Magaziner

This seminar considers the scholarship on African urban life during the twentieth century. We read recent works about intellectual and cultural history, infrastructure and technology, political economy, urban planning, and media. In consultation with the instructor, students spend the last weeks of the course developing a study of a specific African city based on a mix of secondary literature and a dedicated primary source. W 1:30–3:20

HIST 837b/AFST 837b, Decolonization and Independence in Africa Robert Harms

This seminar looks at the process of decolonization in twentieth-century Africa and explores some of the major political, economic, and cultural forces that influenced the trajectories of independent African countries. W 9:25–11:15

HIST 839a/AFST 839a, Environmental History of Africa Robert Harms

An examination of the interaction between people and their environment in Africa and the ways in which this interaction has affected or shaped the course of African history. W 9:25–11:15

HIST 847a, Orientalism and Its Critics Abbas Amanat

The Orient and knowledge of the Other; from travel literature to Oriental studies to Middle East history; beyond academic: art, literature, and cinema; politics of Orientalism and Occidentalism. No language prerequisite. W 3:30–5:20

HIST 854a, Readings in Ottoman History Alan Mikhail

An introduction to the historiography of the Ottoman Empire. Readings include classics in the field as well as examples of recent trends and innovative new works. Emphasis is placed on methodology, source usage, questions or periodization, and other interpretive problems. All students should read Caroline Finkel’s Osman’s Dream for our first meeting. T 1:30–3:20

HIST 858a, Readings in Qing Documents Peter Perdue

This course is an introduction to the use of documents from the Qing dynasty. We examine selected archival and published materials, and discuss how to develop research projects from primary source materials. TH 1:30–3:20

HIST 860a/NELC 830a, From Medina to Constantinople: The Middle East from 600 to 1517 Adel Allouche

The seminar discusses the religious and political events that shaped the Middle East from the rise of Islam to the Ottoman conquest of Egypt. It encompasses Arab lands, Iran, and Turkey. TH 1:30–3:20

HIST 861b, Research in Ottoman History Alan Mikhail

Research seminar focused on methods, sources, and problems in the field of Ottoman history. The overall goal is for students to produce a publishable article based on primary materials. Topics may come from any period of Ottoman history. T 1:30–3:20

HIST 863b, Narratives of Modern Iran Abbas Amanat

Close reading of texts in historical context; studies and discussion on genres of historical writing (1785–1989) to include chronicles, travel literature, diaries and memoirs, literature of dissent. Prerequisite: knowledge of Persian.

HIST 887a, Research in Japanese History Fabian Drixler

This seminar on Japan’s early modern and modern history has three parts. We first read a number of outstanding books and articles to inform and inspire our own research agenda. We then familiarize ourselves with the different types of sources and reference materials. The final six weeks of the course are devoted to individual research projects, which we hone through several cycles of presentations, drafts, and peer review. While the course is designed for graduate students with a reading knowledge of Japanese, it welcomes participants who want to pursue a Japan-centered project with sources in other languages. W 3:30–5:20

HIST 893b/EALL 871b/EAST 593b, History of China’s Republican Period  Denise Ho

This reading seminar examines recent English-language scholarship on China’s Republican period (1912–1949) covering themes from state and economy to society and culture. Weekly topics include state institutions and law, nationalism, politics and political movements, the development of cities, media and publication, public health, education, labor, and rural reconstruction. W 3:30–5:20

HIST 910a/HSHM 745a/WGSS 733a, History of Health Activism Naomi Rogers

This research seminar introduces students to current historical debates around health activism. Topics include progressive and conservative ideologies and debates around them; debates around welfare and entitlements; gender and reproductive rights; medical professionalism; and health activism as a social movement. Research is focused on holdings in Yale libraries. M 1:30–3:20

HIST 913b/HSHM 713b, Geography and History William Rankin

A research seminar focused on methodological questions of geography and geographic analysis in historical scholarship. We consider approaches ranging from the Annales School of the early twentieth century to contemporary research in environmental history, history of science, urban history, and more. We also explore interdisciplinary work in social theory, historical geography, and anthropology and grapple with the promise (and drawbacks) of GIS. Students may write their research papers on any time period or geographic region, and no previous experience with geography or GIS is necessary. Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor. M 1:30–3:20

HIST 919b/HSHM 746b, History and Material Culture Paola Bertucci, Chitra Ramalingam

Approaches to studying material culture historically. What—and how—can historians learn from objects? How can objects be used to do history? This seminar explores methods and literary genres for doing and writing material history from across a range of disciplines: history of science, history of art, anthropology, archaeology, conservation science, and museum studies. W 3:30–5:20

HIST 921b/HSHM 710b, Problems in Science Studies Joanna Radin

Exploration of the methods and debates in the social studies of science, technology, and medicine. This course covers the history of the field and its current intellectual, social, and political positioning. It provides critical tools—including feminist, postcolonial, and new materialist perspectives—to address the relationships among science, technology, medicine, and society. T 1:30–3:20

HIST 930a/AMST 878a/HSHM 701a, Problems in the History of Medicine and Public Health John Harley Warner

An examination of the variety of approaches to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of medicine, focusing on the United States. Reading and discussion of the recent scholarly literature on medical cultures, public health, and illness experiences from the early national period through the present. Topics include the role of gender, class, ethnicity, race, religion, and region in the experience of health care and sickness and in the construction of medical knowledge; the interplay between lay and professional understandings of the body; the role of the marketplace in shaping professional identities and patient expectations; citizenship, nationalism, and imperialism; and the visual cultures of medicine. W 1:30–3:20

HIST 931a/HSHM 702a, Problems in the History of Science Henry Cowles

Survey of classic and recent work in the history of science, broadly conceived. Topics include physical, life, and human sciences; role of technology and instruments; relationship between theory and practice; and interactions with society, politics, and capitalism. Focus on mastering debates in history of science, with connections to philosophy, anthropology, and literary studies. T 3:30–5:20

HIST 936a/HSHM 716a, Early Modern Science and Medicine Paola Bertucci

The course focuses on recent works in the history of science and medicine in the early modern world. We discuss how interdisciplinary approaches—including economic and urban history, sociology and anthropology of science, gender studies, art and colonial history—have challenged the classic historiographical category of “the Scientific Revolution.” We also discuss the avenues for research that new approaches to early modern science and medicine have opened up, placing special emphasis on the circulation of knowledge, practices of collecting, and visual and material culture. T 1:30–3:20

HIST 965a/ANTH 541a/F&ES 836a/PLSC 779a, Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development Fabian Drixler, Peter Perdue, James Scott

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a meaning-centered and historically grounded account of the transformations of rural society. Team-taught. W 1:30–5:20

HIST 967a, Intellectual History as Storytelling Marci Shore

This seminar explores the discipline of intellectual history from the perspective of the historian’s role as author of that history. Topics include the challenges of working with highly personal and subjective sources; the moral dilemmas of relativism; and the relationship between voyeurism and empathy. How do historians relate to novelists grappling with similar material? How can we narrate the history of ideas? How can we write nonfiction about people whose worldviews involved elaborate fantasies about the past, present, and future? How can we situate abstract ideas in concrete times, places, and lives? How do we integrate narrative and analysis? When is it justified to write about the present? The relationship between lunacy and genius is often very intimate; we discuss how historians can approach morally ambiguous historical protagonists be they communist poets, surrealist novelists, fascist philosophers, or others. We focus on storytelling, on history as both art and Wissenschaft. Readings include novels, essays, narrative nonfiction, and the genres in between.

HIST 980a/GLBL 910a, Genocide in History and Theory Benedict Kiernan

Comparative research and analysis of genocidal occurrences around the world from ancient times to the present; theories and case studies; an interregional, interdisciplinary perspective. Readings and discussion, guest speakers, research paper. TH 1:30–3:20

HIST 985bU/MGT 984b, Studies in Grand Strategy, Part I Elizabeth Bradley, John Gaddis, Charles Hill

This two-term course begins in January with readings in classical works from Sun Tzu to Clausewitz to Kissinger. Students identify principles of strategy and examine the extent to which these were or were not applied in historical case studies from the Peloponnesian War to the post-Cold War period. During the summer students undertake research projects or internships designed to apply resulting insights to the detailed analysis of a particular strategic problem or aspect of strategy. Written reports are presented and critically examined early in the fall term. Students must take both terms, fulfill the summer research/internship, and attend additional lectures to be scheduled throughout the spring and fall terms. Admission is by competitive application only; deadline is early November. Please visit http://iss.yale.edu/programs/grand-strategy for application information. M 3:30–5:20

HIST 985aU/MGT 984a, Studies in Grand Strategy, Part II Elizabeth Bradley, Charles Hill

Part II of the two-term linked seminar offered during the calendar year 2016. Research seminar. M 3:30–5:20

HIST 994a/b, Oral Exam Tutorial

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

HIST 995a/b, Prospectus Tutorial

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

HIST 998a/b, Directed Readings

Offered by permission of the instructor and DGS to meet special requirements not covered by regular courses. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

HIST 999a/b, Directed Research

Offered by arrangement with the instructor and permission of DGS to meet special requirements.

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History of Art

Loria Center, Rm. 252, 203.432.2668

http://arthistory.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Tim Barringer (Loria 657, 203.432.8162, timothy.barringer@yale.edu)

Director of Graduate Studies

Jacqueline Jung (Loria 553, 203.432.2684, jacqueline.jung@yale.edu)

Professors Brian Allen (Adjunct), Carol Armstrong, Tim Barringer, Edward Cooke, Jr., Diana Kleiner, Kobena Mercer (on leave [Sp]), Amy Meyers (Adjunct), Mary Miller, Robert Nelson (on leave [F]), Jock Reynolds (Adjunct), Vincent Scully (Emeritus), Nicola Suthor, Robert Thompson (Emeritus), Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan

Associate Professors Milette Gaifman, Jacqueline Jung, Kishwar Rizvi

Assistant Professors Marisa Bass, Craig Buckley, Erica James, Youn-mi Kim, Jennifer Raab, Sebastian Zeidler

Lecturers Martina Droth, Theresa Fairbanks-Harris, Karen Foster, Ian McClure, Ruth Phillips (Visiting)

Fields of Study

Fields include ancient Greek and Roman; Medieval and Byzantine; Renaissance; Early Modern; eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century European; Modern Architecture; African; African American and African diaspora; American; American Decorative Arts; British; Pre-Columbian; Islamic; Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students in the history of Western art must pass examinations in German and one other language pertinent to their field of study. One examination must be passed during the first year of study, the other not later than the beginning of the third term. Students of non-Western art must qualify in two languages selected by agreement with the adviser and the director of graduate studies (DGS). They have an extra year in which to do so. During the first two years of study, students typically take twelve term courses. Normally in March of the second year, students submit a qualifying paper that should demonstrate the candidate’s ability successfully to complete a Ph.D. dissertation in art history. During the fall term of the third year, students are expected to take the qualifying examination. Candidates must demonstrate knowledge of their field and related areas, as well as a good grounding in method and bibliography. By the end of the second term of the third year, students are expected to have established a dissertation topic. A prospectus outlining the topic must be approved by a committee at a colloquium by the end of the third year. Students are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. upon completion of all predissertation requirements, including the prospectus and qualifying examination. Admission to candidacy must take place by the end of the third year.

The faculty considers teaching to be an important part of the professional preparation of graduate students. Students are required to complete four terms of teaching. This requirement is fulfilled in the second and third years. Students may also serve as a graduate research assistant at either the Yale University Art Gallery or the Yale Center for British Art. This can be accepted in lieu of one or two terms of teaching, but students may accept a graduate research assistant position at any time after the end of their first year. Application for these R.A. positions is competitive.

Combined Ph.D. Programs

History of Art and African American Studies

The Department of the History of Art offers, in conjunction with the Department of African American Studies, a combined Ph.D. in History of Art and African American Studies. Students in the combined-degree program must take five courses in African American Studies as part of the required twelve courses and are subject to the language requirement for the Ph.D. in History of Art. The dissertation prospectus and the dissertation itself must be approved by both History of Art and African American Studies. For further details, see African American Studies.

History of Art and Film and Media Studies

The Department of the History of Art offers, in conjunction with the Film and Media Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in the History of Art and Film and Media Studies. Students are required to meet all departmental requirements, but many courses may count toward completing both degrees at the discretion of the directors of graduate studies in History of Art and Film and Media Studies. For further details, see Film and Media Studies.

History of Art and Renaissance Studies

The Department of the History of Art offers, in conjunction with the Renaissance Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in the History of Art and Renaissance Studies. For further details, see Renaissance Studies.

The Center for the Study of American Art and Material Culture

The Center for the Study of American Art and Material Culture provides a programmatic link among the Yale faculty, museum professionals, and graduate students who maintain a scholarly interest in the study, analysis, and interpretation of American art and material culture. It brings together colleagues from a variety of disciplines—from History of Art and American Studies to Anthropology, Archaeological Studies, and Geology and Geophysics—and from some of Yale’s remarkable museum collections, from the Art Gallery and Peabody Museum to Beinecke Library. Center activities will focus upon one particular theme each year and will include hosting one or more visiting American Art and Material Culture Fellows to teach a course each term and interact with Yale colleagues; weekly lunch meetings in which a member makes a short presentation centered on an artifact or group of artifacts followed by lively discussion about methodology, interpretation, and context; and an annual three-day Yale-Smithsonian Seminar on Material Culture.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations. Additionally, students in the History of Art are eligible to pursue a supplemental M.Phil. degree in Medieval Studies. For further details, see Medieval Studies.

M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) This degree is awarded after the satisfactory completion of eight term courses and after evidence of proficiency in one required foreign language.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of the History of Art, Yale University, PO Box 208272, New Haven CT 06520-8272.

Courses

HSAR 500a, Methods in Art History Kishwar Rizvi

This seminar is designed to introduce students to a range of art historical methods past and present: a variety of formalisms, connoisseurship, different kinds of iconography, the social history of art, psychoanalysis, and a number of other approaches that are sometimes referred to as visual culture. Readings include classic texts by Riegl, Wölfflin, Panofsky, and Warburg, and more recent approaches by Alpers, Clark, and Crary, among others. T 10:30–11:20

HSAR 512a or b, Directed Research

By arrangement with faculty.

HSAR 563b/CLSS 864b, Art and Ritual in Greek Antiquity Milette Gaifman

The relationship between art and ritual has received much scholarly attention in various fields, particularly classics, history of art, religious studies, and anthropology. Greek antiquity offers an ideal context for considering the intricate ties between visual culture and religious practices, for much of what is known today as ancient Greek art and architecture was originally related to rituals; artifacts and architectural monuments such as painted pottery, sculptural reliefs, and temples served as settings for worship and ceremonial events and featured representations of activities such as libations and sacrifices. The seminar explores how works of art and architecture shaped ancient practices and theologies. While examining closely ancient artifacts and monuments, students consider the most recent theoretical frames related to the subject from various schools of thought such as the Paris school, British anthropology, and Bildwissenschaft. W 2:30–4:20

HSAR 570a/ARCG 749a/CLSS 846a, Becoming Hadrian: Autobiography and Art in the Second-Century A.D. Diana Kleiner

Marguerite Yourcenar’s famed fictional Memoirs of Hadrian serves as the starting point for an exploration of Hadrian and the art he commissioned in Rome and abroad. Hadrian’s passion for life, quest after peace, romantic wanderlust, veneration of Greek culture, and craving for love, along with his acceptance of death’s inexorableness, led him to commission some of Rome’s greatest monuments. The emperor’s flair for leadership and talent as an amateur architect inform student projects on the sculpture, mosaics, and buildings of the age, among them the portraiture of Hadrian’s lover Antinous, the Pantheon, and Hadrian’s Wall in Britain. Qualified undergraduates who have taken HSAR 250a and/or HSAR 252a may be admitted with permission of the instructor. T 1:30–3:20

HSAR 588a, Studies in Medieval Sculpture, 800–1500 Jacqueline Jung

For much of the Middle Ages, figural sculpture both large- and small-scale was the artistic medium of particular accessibility and power to people of all social stations and ranks. Although sculptural works could communicate theological precepts with the same clarity as images in two dimensions, the artistic and material properties peculiar to sculpture, above all its existence in real space and its ability to simulate the volumes and textures of real human bodies, imbued it with mimetic qualities impossible to achieve in other media, and thus allowed it to generate a range of meanings, responses, and behaviors peculiar to itself. Through a series of case studies of important examples, principally from France and Germany, this seminar explores the place of sculpture in the larger history of medieval art and culture. The human body takes center stage, both as a subject of representation and as a vehicle of perception. Throughout the course we consider the extent to which medieval sculpture, despite its frequent adherence to architectural frames, might be viewed as a dynamic art, one that places special demands on embodied, mobile viewers and that reveals its full significance only in the course of transient activities. Visits to museums in New York and Cambridge, Mass., enhance our understanding of sculpture’s material properties and effects. F 1:30–3:20

HSAR 597b, Word and Image in the Middle Ages Robert Nelson

Word and image studies are a burgeoning field of art history and now have their own journal. This course looks generally at that literature and focuses on the Middle Ages and the Byzantine Empire. Topics of interest are ekphrasis, or the description of a work of art; inscriptions around works of art; and especially manuscript illumination, an area of sustained interest of Anglo-American scholars and historically the most popular subject of scholarship on Byzantine art. More attention has been paid lately to the image or icon, and this work needs to be integrated with a reconsideration of the nature of written and oral discourse. W 1:30–3:20

HSAR 632b, The Life of Forms in Art and The Shape of TimeEeva-Liisa Pelkonen, Nicola Suthor

This seminar focuses on the legacy of two famed twentieth-century Yale-based art historians, Henri Focillon and his student George Kubler, as well as their legacy and impact in both practice and historiography of art and architecture. The focus is on close reading of their most influential books, The Life of Forms in Art and The Shape of Time, which proposed a set of dynamic variables and indeterminacies that drive art from within, celebrating art as the endless process of becoming of form. Their work helped to radicalize the way artists and architects started to think about works of art—no longer in isolation, but rather as pieces in longer procedural chains involving similar forms and problems mediated through space and time. W 1:30–3:20

HSAR 642a, Bosch and Bruegel Marisa Bass

Humor, monstrosity, violence, and the extremes of human nature obsessed two figures who have long defined the art of the sixteenth-century Netherlands: Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Yet despite their looming status in the scholarly and popular imagination, the interpretation of their oeuvres continues to be vexed by methodological problems and debate about the intended meaning of their enigmatic imagery. To understand the impact of their art, moreover, demands looking beyond the local Netherlandish tradition to their transnational reception across early modern Europe, particularly as part of the power dynamics of the Habsburg empire. This year, the 500th anniversary of Bosch’s death, has elicited a flurry of new scholarship and offers an apt moment to reconsider not only the legacy of Bosch but also of Bruegel, the most conscious and creative adaptor of Boschian tradition. Topics include proverbial and popular culture, the rise of the print medium, early modern collecting, genre painting, iconoclasm, the notion of style, workshop practice, technical art history, and the historiography of the northern Renaissance at large. Trips to study relevant works in the Yale Art Gallery and the Metropolitan Museum to be scheduled. TH 1:30–3:20

HSAR 652b, Documenting the World Kishwar Rizvi

This seminar explores the significance of the documentary survey in Europe and the Middle East. Writing the history of the world can only be undertaken from a particular ideological point of view; for example, although medieval illustrated manuscripts, such as the Compendium of History of Rashid al-Din (1304) and the Travels of Sir John Mandeville (ca. 1371), were concerned with situating the reader within the context of religious and political authority, during the eighteenth century the attempt was made to document the world through scientific explorations of race, religion, and geography, as exemplified by the magnum opus Ceremonies and Customs of the World Religions, by Bernard and Picart (1727–31). This seminar studies original and facsimile copies of manuscripts at Yale libraries. TH 10:30–12:20

HSAR 671b/RUSS 671b, The Arts in Russia from Reform to Revolution  Tim Barringer, Molly Brunson

During the second half of the long nineteenth century, Russia experienced an unprecedented flourishing of the arts, evolving rapidly from a country with a relatively young literary tradition and few cultural institutions to one that witnessed the likes of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, the Mighty Five, the Peredvizhniki, and the Ballets Russes. Imperial Russian culture, and especially from the era of reform to the revolution (1855–1917), has served as the foundation for a national canon and a global artistic reputation, its legacy felt in the Russian avant-garde and official Soviet culture alike, and even in the recent recasting of a twenty-first-century national identity. This seminar considers Russian literature, visual arts, music, and drama in their social, historical, and political contexts, and also across a broad historical scope and alongside criticism with a range of disciplinary perspectives. Russia’s conflicted position between East and West, as both part of and apart from Western culture, motivates a number of the course’s driving questions. How does Russia’s particular experience of modernity impact cultural forms and institutions, and what distinguishes Russia’s national manifestations of realism, modernism, and symbolism? How do the arts balance a commitment to pan-European culture with the often self-conscious project of developing a robust national tradition? How is Russian culture introduced to the West, and to what end? How do the various arts experience the transition from the fin de siècle to the Soviet period, and how is this transition represented in Soviet and Western historiography? What constitutes the legacy of “the Russians” in the twentieth century and today? Special attention is also given to questions of aesthetics, form, and genre, as well as to the uneven development and different roles of literature, long considered the dominant art in Russia, and the nonverbal arts. The course concludes with a study trip to Russia after the end of the term. Enrollment limited. Prerequisites: HSAR 221a/RUSS 220a and permission of the instructors. T 1:30–3:20

HSAR 672a, Landscape, Mobility, and Dislocation Tim Barringer, Jennifer Raab

During the long nineteenth century, in a period characterized by industrialization, imperial expansion, and global migration, landscape became an increasingly powerful and contested artistic medium, one that could express the ideologies of empire, philosophies of nature, relationship between geography and vision, and constructions of nationhood and alterity. This course considers such issues by looking at American landscape painting in both a transatlantic and transhemispheric context. We read a range of texts, including those by artists, critics, philosophers, and scientists from the period, in order to examine the cultural, historical, and aesthetic construction of landscape in the nineteenth century, paying particular attention to questions of artistic mobility and dislocation. The course includes a trip to the Hudson River Valley, the favored subject of so many American landscape painters, as well as to New York to view a special installation of works by artists who traveled to Latin America. W 1:30–3:20

HSAR 674a, The History of Color, 1400–2000 Carol Armstrong, Nicola Suthor

This seminar looks at the vexed history of color in all of its aspects, from the Renaissance to the present. Divided between colore/couleur and colorito/coloris, and frequently opposed to disegno/dessin, color has often been relegated to second place and to the status of supplement, derogatorily associated with the superficial, the ephemeral, the deceptive, the illusory, the artificial, and the feminine. At the same time, it has been understood as the “difference” of painting, it is the essence of “what painting is” from a material and practical point of view, it has been at the heart of the paragone debates, and it has been a lynchpin of modern and modernist art and theory. This course looks at the history of thought about color in a variety of areas: the alchemical and chemical; the practical and the theoretical; the science of optics; discourse, rhetoric, poetics, and philosophy. Writers addressed include Cennino Cennini and other authors of artist’s manuals; Roger de Piles, Sir Isaac Newton, and Johann Wolfgang van Goethe; Charles Baudelaire, Michel Eugène Chevreul, and Josef Albers; Rainer Maria Rilke and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Artists considered include Titian, Peter Paul Rubens, and Jean-Antoine Watteau; Eugène Delacroix, J.M.W. Turner, Edouard Manet, and the Impressionists; Georges Seurat and Paul Cézanne; Henri Matisse, Helen Frankenthaler, and the color-field painters. T 1:30–3:20

HSAR 698b/AFAM 511b/WGSS 698b, Fault Lines: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art Erica James

This seminar examines moments in which prevailing representational paradigms of race, gender, and sexuality were disrupted and transformed, affecting three-dimensional paradigm shifts in reading of race, gender, and sexuality in fine art and visual culture. Students deepen their engagement with and writing on this work beyond the ghetto of identity politics by considering multiple methods of theoretical analyses simultaneously. Sites of rupture include the art and visual culture that emerged around the figure of the boxer through Jack Johnson and Muhammad Ali; African diaspora visual poetics in the youth culture of South Africa and Jamaica; and the work of contemporary artists Kalup Linzy, Mickalene Thomas, and Iona Rozeal Brown. TH 1:30–3:20

HSAR 704b, Native American Art History: Objects, Beings, Belongings  Ruth Phillips

This course explores Native North American artistic traditions through close study of individual objects in the collection of the Peabody Museum of Natural History. We undertake a series of investigations including physical description, provenance research, comparative analysis, and historical contextualization in order to explore the ways in which material objects evidence the processes of culture contact, exchange, cultural translation, and colonization that have unfolded since the arrival of Europeans. We investigate the different understandings of material and visual entities proposed by Western and Indigenous ontologies, and we consider the ethical questions of possession and belonging arising from colonial histories of collecting and display. F 10:30–12:20

HSAR 715b, Cubism Sebastian Zeidler

This seminar takes a close look at the work of Braque and Picasso circa 1907 to 1913, with sideways glances at Duchamp (painting) and Dada (collage). The idea is to use Cubist painting, an art that demands and rewards sustained attention, as a means of teaching graduate students a skill they ought to possess but frequently do not: visual analysis. Other, more theoretical issues (formalism, semiology, art and science) arise in due course and are dealt with accordingly. The seminar has a modernist focus, but all who want to practice looking at art are welcome. TH 2:30–4:20

HSAR 718a/GMAN 722a, Mimesis in Art and Nature Paul North

Influential theories postulate that visual art and literature imitate nature. Recent scientific theories postulate that nature also imitates. We investigate what it means for anything to “look like” anything else, in readings of literature, art, and criticism. Authors and topics include Edgar Allan Poe, Nikolai Gogol, Oscar Wilde, and Gerhard Richter on portraiture; Emanuel Swedenborg, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, and René Magritte on correspondence; Aristotle, Erich Auerbach, and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe on mimesis; Goethe, Darwin, Kafka, and Günter Wagner on natural similarities and homology; Peirce, Warburg, and Walker Evans on iconicity. TH 3:30–5:20

HSAR 720a/AMST 805a/REL 966a/RLST 699a/WGSS 779a, Sensational Materialities: Sensory Cultures in History, Theory, and Method Sally Promey

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the sensory and material histories of (often religious) images, objects, buildings, and performances as well as the potential for the senses to spark contention in material practice. With a focus on American things and religions, the course also considers broader geographical and categorical parameters so as to invite intellectual engagement with the most challenging and decisive developments in relevant fields, including recent literatures on material agencies. The goal is to investigate possibilities for scholarly examination of a robust human sensorium of sound, taste, touch, scent, and sight—and even “sixth senses”—the points where the senses meet material things (and vice versa) in life and practice. Topics include the cultural construction of the senses and sensory hierarchies; investigation of the sensory capacities of things; and specific episodes of sensory contention in and among various religious traditions. In addition, the course invites thinking beyond the “Western” five senses to other locations and historical possibilities for identifying the dynamics of sensing human bodies in religious practices, experience, and ideas. The Sensory Cultures of Religion Research Group meets at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays; class participants are strongly encouraged, but not required, to attend. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor; qualified undergraduates are welcome. M 3:30–5:20

HSAR 725b/AMST 736b, An Introduction to American Material Culture  Edward Cooke, Jr.

The field of material culture has drawn from a number of different disciplines and scholarly traditions. Through readings and applications of methodologies ranging from structuralism and semiotics to Marxist criticism and cultural studies, this seminar provides a solid foundation for the interpretation of artifacts.

HSAR 730b/AMST 692b/JDST 799b/REL 967b/RLST 788b, Religion and the Performance of Space Sally Promey, Margaret Olin

This interdisciplinary seminar explores categories, interpretations, and strategic articulations of space in a range of religious traditions. In conversation with the work of major theorists of space, this seminar examines spatial practices of religion in the United States during the modern era, including the conception, construction, and enactment of religious spaces. It is structured around theoretical issues, including historical deployments of secularity as a framing mechanism, ideas about space and place, geography and gender, and relations between property and spirituality. Examples of case studies treated in class include the enactment of rituals within museums, the marking of religious boundaries such as the Jewish “eruv,” and the assignment of “spiritual” ownership in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. The seminar coordinates with several campus events, including research group presentations and an exhibition of work by Thomas Wilfred at the Yale University Art Gallery. Prerequisite: permission of the instructors; qualified undergraduates are welcome. M 3:30–5:20

HSAR 733a/AMST 749a, Material Culture of the Colonial Americas (South and North) Edward Cooke, Jr.

This seminar explores the material culture created and used during the period of the European colonization of North and South America. The intent and priorities of Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, English, and German settlers in the period 1500–1800 are explored and contrasted. In looking at the entire colonial period, the course explores the effects of colonial policies on importation and local production, the impact of imported objects and immigrant craftsmen upon local craft structures, the extent of trade and mobility within the colonies, and the movement of raw materials within a global economy. Close analysis of indigenous cultures, the uneven impact of various European powers, and the different market levels in the New World contribute to a more nuanced understanding of cultural transfer, adaptation, imposition, emulation, imitation, and hybridity. The result is a deeper sense of the meaning of objects within empire, and the agency of the colonial craftsmen. Ceramics, glass, textiles, and base metals reveal the vast trade networks that linked the various colonies. On the other hand, furniture, and some textiles often borrowed from European conventions but were translated into local materials wrought by local modes of workmanship. W 10:30–12:20

HSAR 739b, Histories and Theories of Modern Architecture: Theorizing Space  Craig Buckley

That space is a fundamental category for thinking about architecture may appear self-evident. Yet concepts of space emerge quite late in the historiography of modern architecture. This seminar retraces concepts of space as they emerge and shift from the second half of the nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. In the writings of historians, architects, artists, and critics, space marks an unstable epistemological filter through which to interpret and analyze buildings, works of art, ruins, and public squares. If philosophical aesthetics since Kant had maintained that theorizations of space were an a priori feature of the human mind, the nineteenth century witnessed the rise of a more intensive psychological and formal interest in describing and theorizing spatial experience, one that both troubled and reoriented the Kantian tradition. Nineteenth-century readings include Gottfried Semper’s theorization of architecture as an art of enclosing space; theories of spatial empathy from German psychological aesthetics; and Alois Riegl’s conception of history as the unfolding of space conceptions. In the twentieth century we examine the emergence of space-time theories, vitalist conceptions of living space, geographical conceptions of social space, notions of acoustic and electronic space developed within media theory, and the geographically informed critique of space developed by Henri Lefebvre. TH 1:30–3:20

HSAR 746b/HIST 800b/MDVL 565b, Circa 1000 Valerie Hansen, Mary Miller, Anders Winroth

The world in the year 1000, when the different regions of the world participated in complex networks. Archaeological excavations reveal that the Vikings reached L’Anse aux Meadows, Canada, at roughly the same time that the Kitan people defeated China’s Song dynasty and established a powerful empire stretching across the grasslands of Eurasia. Viking chieftains donned Chinese silks while Chinese princesses treasured Baltic amber among their jewelry. In what is now the American Southwest, the people of Chaco Canyon feasted on tropical chocolate, while the lords of Chichen Itza wore New Mexican turquoise—yet never knew the Huari lords of the central Andes. In this seminar, students read interpretative texts based on archaeology and primary sources, prepare projects in teams, work with material culture, and develop skills of cross-cultural analysis. Mandatory field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York on Saturday, January 21. M 3:30–5:20

HSAR 750aU, Ancient American Art in the Yale University Art Gallery Mary Miller

This course introduces students to both the how and why of ancient American art in the context of a university museum, with a particular focus on the Yale Art Gallery. Pre-Columbian art at Yale and elsewhere was usually first collected in the context of an anthropology or natural history museum, part of larger collections that addressed the history of humanity and were understood to be of archaeological value; only later did works of American antiquity enter art museums and become the subject of art historical study. A reinstallation of the Yale Art Gallery collection has given it a prominent place on the main floor of the museum. Is it foundational in any respect to the museum as a whole? Fundamental to the contextualizing of ancient American materials is an understanding of cultural setting, archaeological sequence, and formal analysis, beginning with the earliest materials in which works of careful facture were imbued with meaning by their makers. In this class, students study the sweep of culture and chronology, from the Chavín to the Inca in the Andes, and from the Olmec to the Aztec in Mesoamerica. T 1:30–3:20

HSAR 751b, The Body in Pain: Representing the Civil War Jennifer Raab

How can art persuasively represent pain and death? What are the limits and possibilities of visually expressing individual and collective suffering? This course considers the images that chronicled the deadliest war in American history, from photographs by Alexander Gardner, Timothy O’Sullivan, and William Bell of battlefields, burned cities, and bullet wounds, to sketches, oil paintings, and engravings by Winslow Homer made at the front lines for Harper’s Weekly. Readings range from period texts by Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, to theoretical sources on violence, trauma, memory, and ethics. Selected meetings at the Yale University Art Gallery, the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library, and the Beinecke, whose recent acquisition of the Meserve-Kunhardt Collection provides a particularly rich and extensive new source for research papers. M 1:30–3:20

HSAR 753b, Theories of Imagination and Visual Perception Margaret Olin

This seminar traces the role of imagination and visual perception as conceived by philosophers, phenomenologists, perceptual psychologists, and other theorists in mainly Western thought since the seventeenth century. The ways in which perception and imagination are conceived together are informed by changing conceptions of each term. “Imagination” can be seen as a mental power of internal image making that must be considered separately from perception, or it may be considered as an indispensable component of perception, which itself can be conceived as a more or less faithful representation or a creative process. Readings are chosen from among the works of John Locke, Immanuel Kant, Hippolyte Taine, Hermann von Helmholtz, Henri Bergson, Jean Piaget, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and others. The significance of the discourse for art and literature is stressed. Students make presentations and submit papers on topics of their choosing in consultation with the instructor. Qualified undergraduates are welcome.

HSAR 783a/AFAM 826a, Theorizing Diaspora Kobena Mercer

This seminar reviews different methods in the study of diasporas and demonstrates their application in research on visual culture and art history. Models addressed to African American, Caribbean, and black British contexts by Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, James Clifford, Brent Hayes Edwards, among others, are examined in relation to art, film, and photography that articulate cross-cultural aesthetics. Debates on hybridization that led to such cognate concepts as syncretism, creolization, and translation are tested in comparative case studies. Texts include Homi Bhabha, Sarat Maharaj, Jean Fisher, Edouard Glissant, and Jan Nederveen Pieterse; and book-length introductions by Robin Cohen, Global Diasporas (2d ed., 2008), and Sudesh Mishra, Diaspora Criticism (2006). TH 3:30–5:20

HSAR 804b/ANTH 787bU/ARCG 787bU, East Asian Objects and Museums: Collection, Curation, and Display Anne Underhill, Youn-mi Kim

This course explores the East Asian art and anthropological collections at Yale’s museums and at other major museums in North America and East Asia. Students study collections and their histories; gain experience in museum practices; and learn from specialists through class visits to other relevant museums in the United States and an associated international conference, Material Culture and Everyday Life before the Korean War: Workshop on the Korean Art and Photograph Collections at the Yale Peabody Museum, sponsored by the Council on East Asian Studies. Opportunities for a student-curated exhibition at Yale are being developed. W 9:25–11:15

HSAR 815b, Momoyama Art in World Perspective Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan

Exploration of art practices in the time of Nobunaga and Hideyoshi, with emphasis on cross-cultural entanglements in the sixteenth century and the optics of the bizarre at the threshold of the early modern world. Coverage includes castle architecture and decoration, the intersection of European and Japanese pictorial modes and painting practices, Christian art in Japan, the tea ceremony and wabi taste, genre painting such as map screens and city views, and the oceanic motif in visual cultures of the early modern period. W 1:30–3:20

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History of Science and Medicine

The Graduate Program in the History of Science and Medicine is a semi-autonomous graduate track within the Department of History. The program’s students are awarded degrees in History, with a concentration in the History of Science and Medicine.

207 Hall of Graduate Studies, 203.432.1365

http://hshm.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Paul Freedman

Director of Graduate Studies

Naomi Rogers

Faculty Paola Bertucci (History), Henry Cowles (History of Medicine), Joanna Radin (History of Medicine), Chitra Ramalingam (History), William Rankin (History), Naomi Rogers (History of Medicine; Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), William Summers (Therapeutic Radiology), John Harley Warner (History of Medicine; History)

Affiliated Faculty Rene Almeling (Sociology), Toby Appel (Librarian for Medical History), Melissa Grafe (Librarian for Medical History), Dimitri Gutas (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations; on leave [Sp]), Ann Hanson (Classics), Jessica Helfand (Yale College), Marcia Inhorn (Anthropology; on leave [Sp]), Kathryn James (Curator, Early Modern Books & Manuscripts, Beinecke Library), Amy Kapczynski (Law), Jennifer Klein (History), Joanne Meyerowitz (History), Amy Meyers (Center for British Art), Alan Mikhail (History), Ayesha Ramachandran (Comparative Literature; on leave [F]), Kevin Repp (Curator, Modern European Books & Manuscripts, Beinecke Library), Paul Sabin (History), Jason Schwartz (Public Health), Gordon Shepherd (Neuroscience), Frank Snowden (History; History of Medicine), Rebecca Tannenbaum (History), Jenifer Van Vleck (History), R. John Williams (English; Film & Media Studies)

Fields of Study

All subjects and periods in the history of science and history of medicine, especially the modern era. Special fields represented include American and European science and medicine; disease, therapeutics, psychiatry, drug abuse, and public health; physics; science and national security; science and law, science and religion, life sciences, human genetics, eugenics, molecular biology, biotechnology, microbiology, intellectual property, gender, race, and science/medicine; bioethics and medical research.

Special Admissions Requirements

Applicants should have a strong undergraduate background in history and in a science relevant to the direction of their graduate interests. These requirements will be applied with flexibility, and outstanding performance in any field pertinent to the program will be taken into consideration.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

All students must show proficiency either in French and German, or in two foreign languages relevant to the student’s research interests and approved by the director of graduate studies (DGS). Students may fulfill the requirement by passing an approved language course for credit, by passing a language test administered by the program faculty, by DGS approval of demonstrated command of a native language other than English, or by graduation from an approved foreign university where teaching was conducted in a language other than English.

Students will ordinarily take twelve term courses during the first two years. All students will normally take the two-term core seminar sequence HSHM 701a/702b or equivalents, HSHM 710a, four additional graduate seminars in history of science or medicine, and at least one graduate course in a field of history outside of science or medicine. The remaining courses can be taken in history of medicine or science, history, science, or any other field of demonstrated special relevance to the student’s scholarly objectives. Two of the twelve courses must be graduate research seminars in the History of Science and Medicine.

During the first two years of study, students must achieve Honors in at least two courses in the first year and Honors in at least four courses by the end of the second year, with a High Pass average overall. At the end of each term, the DGS will ask faculty members whether they have serious concerns about the academic progress of any first- or second-year students in the Ph.D. program. Faculty members who have such concerns will provide written feedback to the DGS at his or her request. The DGS will use his or her discretion to ensure that feedback is provided to any students about whom there are concerns in a clear and effective manner.

At the end of the academic year, the HSHM faculty will hold a special meeting to review each first- and second-year student in the program. The purpose of the meeting is to assess students’ academic progress. In order for second years to proceed to the third year, they must demonstrate through written work, classroom performance, and participation in departmental activities that they have the ability to: (a) speak and write clearly; (b) conduct independent research at a high level; and (c) develop coherent scholarly arguments. A faculty vote will be taken at the conclusion of the review meeting to decide whether each second-year student may continue in the program. If a majority of faculty present and voting determine that a student may not continue, the student will be informed in writing and withdrawn from the program. The review meeting must be a full faculty meeting, but faculty members with no knowledge of the students under review may abstain from the vote, and their abstentions will not count in the total. Those members of the faculty who have worked with or know the students being evaluated are required to attend. In the event that any necessary faculty members absolutely cannot be present, they may send their views in writing to the DGS, who will read them at the meeting.

Students who enter having previously completed graduate work may obtain up to three course credits toward the completion of the total course requirement, the amount being contingent on the extent and nature of the previous work and its fit with their intended course of study at Yale.

All students are expected, prior to entering on their dissertation work, to develop a broad general knowledge of the discipline. This knowledge may be acquired through a combination of course work taken at Yale or elsewhere, regular participation in the program colloquia and workshops, and preparation for the qualifying oral examination.

Students will normally spend the summer following their second year preparing for the oral qualifying examination, which will be taken in the third year, preferably during the first half.

The qualifying examination will cover four areas of chosen concentration:

  • 1 & 2. two fields in the history of science and/or history of medicine;
  • 3. a field in an area of history outside of medicine and/or science;
  • 4. a field of special interest, the content and boundaries to be established with the adviser for the field. The student may elect to do a second field in history outside of history of science or medicine; or a field in one of the sciences; or a field in a subject such as bioethics, health policy, public health, medical anthropology, medical sociology, science and law, science and national security, science and religion, science and culture, biotechnology, gender, science and medicine; race, science and medicine, or cultural studies.

During their first term in the program, all students will be advised by the DGS. During the second term and thereafter, each student will be advised by a faculty member of his or her choosing. The adviser will provide guidance in selecting courses and preparing for the qualifying examination. The adviser may also offer help with the development of ideas for the dissertation, but students are free to choose someone else as the dissertation supervisor when the time comes to do so. Students are encouraged to discuss their interests and program of study with other members of the faculty.

Students are encouraged to begin thinking about their dissertation topics during the second year. They are required to prepare a dissertation prospectus as soon as possible following the qualifying examination and to defend the prospectus orally before being admitted to full candidacy for the doctoral degree. Ordinarily the prospectus defense is held in the second term of the third year, with advancement to candidacy before the start of the fourth year.

Teaching is an important part of the professional preparation of graduate students in History of Science and Medicine. Students will teach, usually in the third and fourth years of study. They may, however, teach in the second term of the second year, deferring the completion of their required course work to the first term of the third year. Students are also encouraged to participate in the programs to develop teaching skills offered by the Graduate School. All HSHM students are expected to teach for four terms; two terms of teaching are required in order to receive the Ph.D.

In the fourth or fifth year, and preferably no later than the fall term of the fifth year, students are required to submit a chapter of the dissertation (not necessarily the first chapter) to the dissertation committee. This chapter will then be discussed with the student by members of the committee, preferably in a colloquium, to give the student additional advice and counsel on the progress of the dissertation. This conference is designed to be an extension of the conversation begun in the prospectus defense and is not intended as another defense; its aim is to give students early feedback on the research, argument, and style of the first writing accomplished on the dissertation.

M.D./Ph.D. and J.D./Ph.D. Joint-Degree Programs

Students may pursue a doctorate in History of Science and Medicine jointly with a degree in Medicine or Law. Standard graduate financial support is provided for the doctoral phase of work toward such a joint degree. Candidates for the joint degree in Law must apply for admission to both the Law School and the Graduate School. Information about the joint-degree program with Medicine can be obtained from the Web site of the Yale School of Medicine (http://medicine.yale.edu/mdphd) and from the Web site of the Section of the History of Medicine (http://medicine.yale.edu/histmed).

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. and M.A. (en route to the Ph.D.) See Degree Requirements under Policies and Regulations.

Terminal Master’s Degree Program For the terminal master’s degree students must pass seven term courses, four of which must be in HSHM. Course work will normally include the three “Problems” graduate seminars and one additional graduate seminar in HSHM. The remaining courses are to be chosen in consultation with the DGS or a faculty adviser. Honors grades are required in two courses, with a High Pass average overall. Financial aid is not available for this M.A. program.

More information is available on the program’s Web site, http://hshm.yale.edu.

Courses

HSHM 701a/AMST 878a/HIST 930a, Problems in the History of Medicine and Public Health John Harley Warner

An examination of the variety of approaches to the cultural, social, and intellectual history of medicine, focusing on the United States. Reading and discussion of the recent scholarly literature on medical cultures, public health, and illness experiences from the early national period through the present. Topics include the role of gender, class, ethnicity, race, religion, and region in the experience of health care and sickness and in the construction of medical knowledge; the interplay between lay and professional understandings of the body; the role of the marketplace in shaping professional identities and patient expectations; citizenship, nationalism, and imperialism; and the visual cultures of medicine. W 1:30–3:20

HSHM 702a/HIST 931a, Problems in the History of Science Henry Cowles

Survey of classic and recent work in the history of science, broadly conceived. Topics include physical, life, and human sciences; role of technology and instruments; relationship between theory and practice; and interactions with society, politics, and capitalism. Focus on mastering debates in history of science, with connections to philosophy, anthropology, and literary studies. T 3:30–5:20

HSHM 710b/HIST 921b, Problems in Science Studies Joanna Radin

Exploration of the methods and debates in the social studies of science, technology, and medicine. This course covers the history of the field and its current intellectual, social, and political positioning. It provides critical tools—including feminist, postcolonial, and new materialist perspectives—to address the relationships among science, technology, medicine, and society. T 1:30–3:20

HSHM 713b/HIST 913b, Geography and History William Rankin

A research seminar focused on methodological questions of geography and geographic analysis in historical scholarship. We consider approaches ranging from the Annales School of the early twentieth century to contemporary research in environmental history, history of science, urban history, and more. We also explore interdisciplinary work in social theory, historical geography, and anthropology and grapple with the promise (and drawbacks) of GIS. Students may write their research papers on any time period or geographic region, and no previous experience with geography or GIS is necessary. Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor. M 1:30–3:20

HSHM 716a/HIST 936a, Early Modern Science and Medicine Paola Bertucci

The course focuses on recent works in the history of science and medicine in the early modern world. We discuss how interdisciplinary approaches—including economic and urban history, sociology and anthropology of science, gender studies, art and colonial history—have challenged the classic historiographical category of “the Scientific Revolution.” We also discuss the avenues for research that new approaches to early modern science and medicine have opened up, placing special emphasis on the circulation of knowledge, practices of collecting, and visual and material culture. T 1:30–3:20

HSHM 729b/AFAM 705b/AMST 708b/ENGL 708b/HIST 708b, The History of Race  Greta LaFleur

This course offers a broad survey of the history of racial science and racialist thinking in the Atlantic world from the early modern period through the late nineteenth century. Rather than attempting to detail the histories of specific racial formations (such as blackness or whiteness), the course tracks the intellectual history of the emergence of “race” as a specific category of human differentiation and traces a swath of its most muscular—and pernicious—permutations through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. W 1:30–3:20

HSHM 745a/HIST 910a/WGSS 733a, History of Health Activism Naomi Rogers

This research seminar introduces students to current historical debates around health activism. Topics include progressive and conservative ideologies and debates around them; debates around welfare and entitlements; gender and reproductive rights; medical professionalism; and health activism as a social movement. Research is focused on holdings in Yale libraries. M 1:30–3:20

HSHM 746b/HIST 919b, History and Material Culture Paola Bertucci, Chitra Ramalingam

Approaches to studying material culture historically. What—and how—can historians learn from objects? How can objects be used to do history? This seminar explores methods and literary genres for doing and writing material history from across a range of disciplines: history of science, history of art, anthropology, archaeology, conservation science, and museum studies. W 3:30–5:20

HSHM 747a/AMST 744a/F&ES 617a/HIST 744a, Readings and Research in Energy History Paul Sabin

The history of energy in the United States and the world. Readings and discussion range widely across different forms of energy: animal power, biomass, and early hydropower; coal, oil, and atomic energy; and present-day hydraulic fracturing, wind, and solar. Themes include relations between energy producers and communities, including resistance to energy projects; cultural and social change associated with dominant energy regimes; labor struggles and environmental transformations; the global quest for oil; and changing national energy policies. We explore new approaches to writing and teaching the history of energy. Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor. M 1:30–3:20

HSHM 914a or b, Research Tutorial I

By arrangement with faculty.

HSHM 915a or b, Research Tutorial II

By arrangement with faculty.

HSHM 920a or b, Independent Reading

By arrangement with faculty.

HSHM 930a or b, Independent Research

By arrangement with faculty.

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Immunobiology

Anlyan Center (TAC) S625, 203.785.3857

http:// immunobiology.yale.edu/

M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

David Schatz

Director of Graduate Studies

Susan Kaech (TAC 641B, 203.737.2423, susan.kaech@yale.edu)

Director of Graduate Admissions

João Pereira (TAC 541A, 203.737.2089, joao.pereira@yale.edu)

Student Services Officer

Barbara Cotton (TAC S625, 203.785.3857, barbara.cotton@yale.edu)

Professors Jeffrey Bender (Internal Medicine), Alfred Bothwell, Lieping Chen, Joseph Craft (Internal Medicine), Peter Cresswell, Madhav Dhodapkar (Internal Medicine), Vishwa Dixit (Comparative Medicine), Richard Flavell, David Hafler (Neurology), Kevan Herold, Akiko Iwasaki, Susan Kaech, Paula Kavathas (Laboratory Medicine), Ruslan Medzhitov, Jordan Pober, Craig Roy (Microbiology), David Schatz, Robert Tigelaar (Dermatology)

Associate Professors Tarek Fahmy (Biomedical Engineering), Eric Meffre, Carla Rothlin, Bing Su

Assistant Professors Stephanie Eisenbarth (Laboratory Medicine), Ann Haberman (Laboratory Medicine), Martin Kriegel, Carrie Lucas, Noah Palm, João Pereira, Aaron Ring

Fields of Study

The Immunobiology graduate program is designed to prepare students for independent careers in research and teaching in immunology or related disciplines. The educational program emphasizes interdisciplinary training and collaborative and interactive research, an approach based on the idea that solving difficult problems requires the integration of individuals with common goals but differing expertise. Graduate students are diverse in their interests and ethnic backgrounds, and more than 50 percent are women.

Research Areas

Research focuses on the molecular, cellular, and genetic underpinnings of immune system function and development, on host-pathogen interactions, and on human and translational immunology, with a particular interest in a variety of autoimmune disorders. These research interests break down into six major themes, spanning almost all aspects of the immune system and its role in disease prevention.

Lymphocyte development A central focus of research is to understand the molecular events underlying the development of B and T lymphocytes. Areas of major interest include the receptors and signals that control lymphocyte lineage commitment, cell maturation, cell proliferation, and cell death; the establishment of the proper environments for lymphocyte development; mechanisms that regulate the state of chromatin during lymphocyte development; and the mechanisms by which antibody and T cell receptor genes are assembled and diversified.

Mounting an immune response An effective immune response requires the coordinated action of numerous cell types. A critical first step is the activation of cells of the innate immune system, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and neutrophils; and the receptors and signaling molecules that control this process are under intensive study. The mechanism by which cells take up, process, and present antigen is a major interest, as is the recognition of this antigen by T cell receptors on T lymphocytes. Cytoplasmic signal transduction molecules, nuclear transcription factors, and mechanisms controlling gene expression are all under study.

Regulating the immune response The immune response is tightly regulated through the interaction of cell surface receptors with secreted cytokines and with one another, and the mechanisms by which these interactions exert their regulatory influences are studied in several laboratories. Another major interest is in learning how specialized cells or anatomic locations, such as vascular endothelial cells or the epidermis, regulate and direct the immune response.

Consequences of an immune response Apart from the obvious consequence of the elimination of an invading organism, an appropriate immune response results in immunological memory and large numbers of activated lymphocytes, which must be eliminated. The mechanisms controlling immunological memory, tolerance, and apoptosis, as well as those leading to autoimmunity, are a major interest of many faculty. Diabetes, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis are just some of the autoimmune diseases under study. Much of this work takes place in the context of the Section of Human and Translational Immunology.

Infectious disease and the host-pathogen interaction A major interest is the study of infectious organisms—bacterial, viral, and parasitic—and the immune response to them. A great deal of effort is directed toward understanding the strategies used by infectious agents to avoid the immune system. HIV, HBV (hepatitis B virus), herpes simplex virus, parvoviruses, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi (the causative agent of Lyme disease), Leishmania, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophilia are all under study.

Structural analysis of immune system receptors and effectors There is a growing interest in using structural approaches to understand the function of key molecules of the immune response. For example, a major effort is devoted toward understanding how the Toll-like receptors, despite their similarity in extracellular-ligand recognition regions, are able to specifically recognize such a wide variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS). Another effort is aimed at understanding the mechanism of APOBEC enzymes in controlling viruses such as HIV.

Facilities

More than thirty laboratories are actively involved in research in immunology. Many share immediately adjoining or nearby laboratory space on the top three floors of the Anlyan Center (TAC), 10 Amistad Street, and 300 George Street, and three faculty are funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The Department of Immunobiology provides one of the largest, highest-ranked training programs in immunology in the country, led by a faculty with a reputation for excellence in research. The Department of Immunobiology maintains a wide variety of major equipment, and Dr. Richard Flavell oversees a very active transgenic mouse/ES cell/knockout facility to which members of the department have access.

Program Entry

Most students enter the Immunobiology graduate program through the Immunology track of the interdepartmental graduate program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS), http://bbs.yale.edu. Other types of students enter from the M.D./Ph.D. program (see below), the MRSP (see below), or another BBS track, with approval of the Immunobiology director of graduate studies (DGS) and the faculty adviser.

The faculty and students of the BBS program are organized into interest-based tracks. Immunology, being one of seven tracks, encourages individualized attention to maximize scientific interactions. There is complete freedom to work with any of the 350 faculty members affiliated within any of the tracks and to take courses offered by any of the BBS departments or programs. Students are encouraged to supplement core courses in molecular and cellular immunology with additional courses selected from the wide range available in cell biology, molecular biology, developmental biology, biochemistry, genetics, pharmacology, molecular medicine, neuroscience, and bioinformatics. Research seminars and informal interactions with other graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty also form an important part of graduate education.

The Section of Human and Translational Immunology (HTI) is a component of the Immunobiology department and is located at 10 Amistad Street and 300 George Street. Its mission is to accelerate the application of new developments in the field of immunology to the treatment of human diseases. HTI faculty study the immunologic aspects of a very broad range of human diseases, encompassing investigations in the fields of cancer; transplantation of solid organs and stem cells; autoimmune diseases; and neurologic disease.

The Medical Research Scholars Program (MRSP) is open to students who have already been accepted into the BBS program. A separate application is also required, and is to be submitted to the BBS. A total of eight students each year (four first-years and four second-years) will be enrolled as Medical Research Scholars. They remain in their BBS tracks or departments but participate in the additional MRSP curriculum. The program bridges barriers between traditional predoctoral and medical training by providing Yale Ph.D. students with both medically oriented course work and a mentored clinical experience. This combination of medical knowledge and face-to-face interaction with patients and their doctors provides a new perspective to Ph.D. students and enhances the rigorous training in basic science already provided.

Admission requirements In addition to meeting general BBS requirements, applicants are expected to have a firm foundation in the biological and physical sciences. It is preferred that students have taken courses in biology, organic chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, physics, and mathematics. Actual course requirements, however, are not fixed, and students with outstanding records in any area of the biological sciences may qualify for admission. There are no specific grade requirements for prior course work, but a strong performance in basic science courses is of great importance for admission. In special cases, the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores may substitute for scores on the general GRE.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students are required to take six courses for a grade in the Yale Graduate School.

Required graded courses for first- and second-year students are:

  • 1. IBIO 530a, Biology of the Immune System (Students have the option of passing out of 530 by taking the final exam from the previous year.)
  • 2. IBIO 531b, Advanced Immunology
  • 3. Two Immunobiology seminar courses taken from this series: IBIO 536, 537, 538, 539 (The second seminar course can be audited if a student has grades in six other science courses and has already taken one seminar course for credit.)

Required credit-only, nongraded courses for first-year students are:

  • 1. IBIO 600a, Introduction to Faculty Research
  • 2. IBIO 611a, 612b, 613b, Research Rotations (short research projects are taken under the guidance of three Yale professors)
  • 3. IBIO 601b, Fundamentals of Research: Responsible Conduct of Research

Fourth-year students are required to take IBIO 503b, a refresher training course in the responsible conduct of research.

Additional courses are determined based on the individual needs of the student, and include courses in biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, molecular biology of prokaryotes, molecular biology of eukaryotes, animal viruses, the structure of nucleic acids and proteins, microbiology, and disease mechanisms. Students choose courses after consulting the DGS and the thesis adviser.

Honors The Graduate School uses grades of Honors, High Pass, Pass, or Fail. Students are required to earn a grade of Honors in at least two courses in the first two years, and are expected to maintain a High Pass average. There is no foreign language requirement.

Teaching Students are required to serve as a science TA (teaching assistant) for two terms before the end of their sixth term. Teaching protocol and rules are as follows:

  • 1. Teaching two term-long science courses is required as a fulfillment of the Ph.D.;
  • 2. First-year students do not teach;
  • 3. Teaching opportunities are first given to students who need teaching credit;
  • 4. Teaching for additional income is available when openings exist after those selected for credit are hired; approval signatures from the adviser and DGS are required.
  • 5. The maximum teaching allowed is one course per term.

A Yale McDougal Center one-day seminar entitled “Teaching at Yale” is offered each year. Attending this seminar is recommended prior to teaching.

Prospectus and qualifying exam Early in the fourth term (or in certain circumstances, in the third term), students make a thirty-minute presentation to the department of their proposed research and initial results. Thereafter, they meet with their prospectus committee, which assigns four or five broad areas of biology and immunology that are of particular relevance to the proposed research and on which the student will be examined in the qualifying exam. During the next several weeks, students prepare a formal research proposal (in NIH grant format) concerning the proposed thesis research and study for the exam. The exam is held within three months. It is an oral exam covering all aspects of immunology generally, with a focus on the assigned areas mentioned above. The student is questioned on aspects of the thesis proposal.

Admission to candidacy Requirements for admission to candidacy, which usually takes place after six terms of residence, are: completion of course requirements, one of the two teaching requirements, the qualifying exam, and the third-year committee meeting—at the one-year anniversary of the qualifying exam—with a signed certification form from the adviser and committee members verifying that the student has made good progress.

Progress in thesis research in the third and later years is monitored carefully by the student’s thesis committee (composed of the adviser and three or four other faculty). See below.

M.D./Ph.D. Students Majoring in Immunobiology

Required Six courses for a grade. Out of the six courses the following are mandatory:

  • 1. IBIO 530a, Biology of the Immune System (Students have the option of passing out of 530 by taking the final exam from the previous year.)
  • 2. IBIO 531b, Advanced Immunology
  • 3. Two Immunobiology seminar courses taken from this series: IBIO 536, 537, 538, 539 (The second seminar course can be audited if a student has grades in six other courses and has already taken one seminar course for credit.)

Also required Two grades of Honors: Yale University graduate courses taken for a grade at the School of Medicine may be counted toward the Honors fulfillment and the six total required courses. Verification must be provided to the DGS. One term of teaching: Previously taught courses in the School of Medicine may count toward this requirement. To request credit for previous teaching experience, a note from the course director describing the teaching experience (duration of the teaching experience, frequency of class meetings, number of students taught, materials covered, dates, and for whom) should be provided to the Immunobiology DGS. Responsible Conduct of Research, Refresher Course: Fourth-year students are required to take a refresher training course in the responsible conduct of research. M.D./Ph.D. students can fulfill this NIH requirement through Immunobiology (IBIO 603b) or through the M.D./Ph.D. program.

M.D./Ph.D. students are not required to take:

  • 1. IBIO 600a, Introduction to Research
  • 2. IBIO 611a, 612b, 613b, Research Rotations
  • 3. IBIO 601b, Fundamentals of Research: Responsible Conduct of Research. A note from the DGS of the M.D./Ph.D. program must be forwarded to the Immunobiology DGS stating that the student has taken a course in Research Conduct and Ethics, or its equivalent in the School of Medicine. Include dates, titles, and faculty. If the student has not taken this course, then registration in this class is required.

Annual thesis committee meetings Each student is required to have a thesis committee meeting at least every twelve months, and more frequently if the student or committee feels that it would be appropriate or helpful. The thesis supervisor (the student’s PI) then submits a thesis committee report form to the DGS summarizing the student’s progress.

Master’s Degrees

M.Phil. A student is entitled to the M.Phil. degree once all academic and prospectus requirements, and one of the two teaching requirements, have been met. Also required is a third-year committee meeting at which the members sign an approval form stating that the student is making good progress toward his or her research.

M.S. (en route to the Ph.D.) Students who complete at least one year of resident graduate study at Yale with the quality of work judged satisfactory by the Department of Immunobiology faculty and who have satisfied ten courses with an average grade point average of High Pass (graded) and Pass (ungraded) may petition for the award of the M.S. degree. Students must petition through the Registrar’s Office of the Graduate School in early October for the December award of the M.S. and by the middle of March for the May award. Students who are eligible for or who have already received the M.Phil. will not be awarded the M.S.

For additional information on the Program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences see http://bbs.yale.edu.

Courses

For a complete listing of immunology-related courses, see http://bbs.yale.edu.

IBIO 503b, Responsible Conduct of Research, Refresher Course

The NIH requires that students receive training in the responsible conduct of research every four years. This course meets that requirement for fourth-year students. The course has two components: (1) one large-group session is held for all fourth-year students through the BBS; the main topics are scientific misconduct and authorship; (2) two Immunobiology faculty facilitate discussions based on RCR topics, gathered in advance from the students; anonymous or hypothetical stories are selected by the faculty and discussed in a workshop environment in which students are then asked to analyze each case and suggest courses of actions.

IBIO 530a/MBIO 530a/MCDB 530au, Biology of the Immune System Carla Rothlin, Peter Cresswell, Vishwa Dixit, Akiko Iwasaki, Susan Kaech, Martin Kriegel, Ruslan Medzhitov, Eric Meffre, Noah Palm, João Pereira, Craig Roy, David Schatz

The development of the immune system. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune recognition. Effector responses against pathogens. Immunologic memory and vaccines. Human diseases including allergy, autoimmunity, cancer, immunodeficiency, HIV/AIDS. MWF 9:25–10:15

IBIO 531b, Advanced Immunology Alfred Bothwell and faculty

The historical development and central paradigms of key areas in immunology. The course attempts to develop a clear understanding of how these paradigms were established experimentally. Landmark studies are discussed to determine how the conclusions were obtained and why they were important at the time they were done. Lecture and discussion format; readings of primary research papers and review articles. Prerequisite: IBIO 530a or equivalent. Enrollment limited to fifteen. MW 4:30–6:30

IBIO 532b, Inflammation Ruslan Medzhitov

This course covers fundamentals of inflammation from a broad biological perspective, with a focus on both physiological and pathological aspects of inflammation. W 3:30–5:20

IBIO 536a, Advanced Immunology Seminar: Metabolic Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity Susan Kaech, Vishwa Dixit, Gerald Shadel

F 1:30–3:30

IBIO 537b, Antigen Processing and DC Biology Peter Cresswell, Stephanie Eisenbarth

Prerequisites: IBIO 530a and 531b. MW 11:35–12:50

IBIO 600a, Introduction to Research: Faculty Research Presentations  Susan Kaech and faculty

Introduction to the research interests of the faculty. Required of all first-year Immunology/BBS students. Pass/Fail.

IBIO 601b/CB&B 601b, Fundamentals of Research: Responsible Conduct of Research Susan Kaech and faculty

A weekly seminar presented by faculty trainers on topics relating to proper conduct of research. Required of first-year Immunobiology students, first-year CB&B students, and training grant-funded postdocs. Pass/Fail. T 5

IBIO 611a, Research Rotation 1 Susan Kaech and faculty

Intensive experience in the design and execution of experiments in immunology or other areas of biology. Students design a focused research project in consultation with a faculty mentor and execute the designed experiments in the mentor’s laboratory. Students are expected to read relevant background papers from the literature, design and perform experiments, interpret the resulting data, and propose follow-up experiments. Students are also expected to attend the mentor’s weekly lab meeting(s) as well as weekly Immunobiology departmental seminars and Research in Progress seminars. The course concludes with the student giving a brief presentation of the work performed at Rotation Talks, attended by other first-year immunology-track graduate students. Evaluation is by the mentor; students also evaluate the rotation experience. Students must turn in a prioritized list of four possible mentors to Barbara Cotton in the office of the director of graduate studies at least one week prior to the beginning of the course. Mentors are assigned by the DGS. Graded Pass/Fail. 1 course credit; minimum of 20 hours/week. Required of all first-year Immunology/BBS students.

IBIO 612b, Research Rotation 2 Susan Kaech and faculty

See description under IBIO 611a.

IBIO 613b, Research Rotation 3 Susan Kaech and faculty

See description under IBIO 611a.

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International and Development Economics

Economic Growth Center

27 Hillhouse Avenue, 203.432.3610

http://ide.yale.edu

M.A.

Director

Dean Karlan

Director of Graduate Studies

Michael Boozer

The Department of Economics offers a one-year program of study in International and Development Economics, leading to the Master of Arts degree. IDE students are diverse in terms of their nationalities and their career paths. Many of our students now come directly from their undergraduate school or a few years of work experience, although we do not exclude any candidate on the basis of work experience or country of origin. After completion of the program, IDE students have gone into various paths, including working in research for academic and nonacademic agencies such as the World Bank, the United Nations, and the Poverty Action Lab. Other students have gone on to further academic work such as law school and to Ph.D. programs in economics, environmental sciences, public health, and similar programs. Many students have returned to their home countries to work for their government or for funding agencies there.

Some students entering the program are required to complete the summer program in English and Mathematics for Economists offered by Yale University. This requirement may be waived for applicants demonstrating exceptional training in economic analysis and a good command of English. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) examinations are also required. The TOEFL requirement is waived only for applicants who will have received a degree, prior to matriculation at Yale, from a college or university where English is the primary language of instruction.

Yale fellowship funds are not available for the IDE program, and students are required to produce certification of the necessary funding prior to enrollment.

The course program requires the completion of eight graduate-level courses, six of which make up the core elements of the IDE program and are required; the remaining two are graduate electives. The required courses are Microeconomics; Macroeconomics; Econometrics; Economics of Poverty Alleviation: Evidence from Experimental Evaluations; Development Economics; Development Econometrics. These required courses are designed to provide a rigorous understanding of the economic theory necessary for economic policy analysis. In special circumstances, in consultation with the DGS, students may receive credit toward the degree for undergraduate language classes. An option of a second year of nondegree elective study is available via the special student registration status.

Joint-program options for study with the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (F&ES) and the School of Public Health (YSPH) are also available. Application to F&ES or YSPH must be made simultaneously with the application to the IDE program. Admission to these joint programs is determined by the participating professional school and must be obtained prior to beginning the program. Joint-degree students earn the Master of Arts degree in IDE and the Master of Environmental Studies (F&ES) or Master of Public Health (YSPH) degree.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit the IDE program Web site at http://ide.yale.edu. Program materials are available upon request to Louise Danishevsky, Senior Administrative Assistant, International and Development Economics Program, Yale University, PO Box 208269, New Haven CT 06520-8269; e-mail, ide@yale.edu.

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Investigative Medicine

2 Church Street South, Suite 112, 203.785.6842

http://medicine.yale.edu/investigativemedicine

Ph.D.

Director of Graduate Studies

Joseph Craft (joseph.craft@yale.edu)

Deputy Director

Eugene Shapiro

Professors Karen Anderson (Pharmacology), Joseph Craft (Internal Medicine; Immunobiology), David Fiellin (Internal Medicine; Epidemiology), Thomas Gill (Internal Medicine; Epidemiology), Fred Gorelick (Internal Medicine; Cell Biology), Jeffrey Gruen (Pediatrics; Genetics), Harlan Krumholz (Internal Medicine; Epidemiology), Chirag Parikh (Internal Medicine), Eugene Shapiro (Pediatrics; Epidemiology), George Tellides (Surgery), Mary Tinetti (Internal Medicine; Epidemiology)

Fields of Study

The Investigative Medicine program offers a training pathway for highly select physicians in clinical departments who are interested in careers in clinical research. The program is designed to develop a broad knowledge base, analytical skills, creative thinking, and the hands-on experience demanded of clinical researchers devoted to disease-oriented and patient-oriented investigation. The program provides the student with individualized experience encompassing formal course work and practical experience, under the supervision and mentorship of a senior faculty member.

Students will enter the program with a broad range of experience and interests. Students can undertake thesis work in a variety of disciplines. These include but are not limited to:

  • 1. Evaluating risk factors and interventions for disease using modern concepts in quantitative methods and clinical study design.
  • 2. Investigating the biochemical, physiologic, and genetic basis of disease in the setting of a Clinical Research Center.
  • 3. Exploring the molecular basis of a disease from the laboratory standpoint.

Special Admissions Requirements

The Investigative Medicine program is designed for students with an M.D. or D.O. degree. To be eligible for admission, applicants must have completed two or more years of postgraduate clinical training. Prospective students who are already in a residency or subspecialty clinical fellowship program at Yale may apply to the Investigative Medicine program anytime during the first two years of that training (approximate). Application to the program also may be made concurrently with application for residency or fellowship training in a clinical department at the Yale School of Medicine. Special arrangements will be made for a deferred acceptance by the Graduate School.

The most important criteria for selection into the program are commitment to rigorous training in clinical investigation and evidence of high academic achievement in undergraduate and medical school courses, and on scores from the USMLE. All applicants must be eligible to practice medicine in the United States.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

The minimum overall course requirements for the doctorate program are completion of nine (9) courses. Intensive course work will extend for twelve months, starting in July. The majority of the course requirements are to be completed by the end of the first year of study. Prior to registering for a second year of study, students must successfully complete IMED 630a, Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research. In addition to IMED 655b, electives are often taken in the second year, with the expectation that they be completed by the end of the second year. To be eligible to take the comprehensive qualifying examination, students must achieve the grade of Honors in two courses (one course if a full-year course), have a minimum grade average of High Pass, and have completed a minimum of six courses. When requirements are met (typically by December 31 of the second year), students submit their thesis proposal and undertake the comprehensive qualifying examination. In order to be admitted to candidacy, students must pass both the written and oral comprehensive qualifying examinations and submit a thesis prospectus that has been approved by their qualifying committee. The remaining degree requirements include completion of the dissertation project, writing of the dissertation, and its oral defense. It is expected that most students will complete the program in three to five years. There is no foreign language requirement. The minimum required curriculum for each program of study is as follows:

Course Requirements for Laboratory-Based Patient-Oriented Research
  • IMED 625a, Principles of Clinical Research
  • IMED 630a, Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research
  • IMED 635a or b, Directed Reading in Investigative Medicine
  • IMED 645a, Introduction to Biostatistics in Clinical Investigation
  • IMED 655b, Writing Your Career Development (K-type) Grant or IMED 670b, Writing Your First Independent Investigator-Initiated (R-type) Grant
  • IMED 680b, Topics in Human Investigation
  • CBIO 601, Molecular and Cellular Basis of Human Disease
  • CB&B 740a, Clinical and Translational Informatics
  • Elective (1)
Course Requirements for Clinically Based Patient-Oriented Research
  • IMED 630a, Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research
  • IMED 635a or b, Directed Reading in Investigative Medicine
  • IMED 655b, Writing Your Career Development (K-type) Grant or IMED 670b, Writing Your First Independent Investigator-Initiated (R-type) Grant
  • IMED 660c, Methods in Clinical Research, Part I
  • IMED 661a, Methods in Clinical Research, Part II
  • IMED 662b, Methods in Clinical Research, Part III
  • IMED 680b, Topics in Human Investigation
  • Electives (2)

Courses

IMED 625a, Principles of Clinical Research Eugene Shapiro

The purpose of this intensive two-week course is to provide an overview of the objectives, research strategies, and methods of conducting patient-oriented clinical research. Topics include competing objectives of clinical research, principles of observational studies, principles of clinical trials, principles of meta-analysis, interpretation of diagnostic tests, prognostic studies, causal inference, qualitative research methods, and decision analysis. Sessions generally combine a lecture on the topic with discussion of articles that are distributed in advance of the sessions. Consent of instructor required. Two weeks, July 25–August 5, 2016. MTWThF 2–4

IMED 630a, Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research Joseph Craft

This term-long course addresses topics that are central to the conduct of biomedical research, including the ethics of clinical investigation, conflicts of interest, misconduct in research, data acquisition, and protection of research subjects. Practical sessions cover topics such as collaborations with industry, publication and peer review, responsible authorship, and mentoring relationships. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the NIH requirement for training in Responsible Conduct of Research. Format consists of lecture presentation followed by discussion. Consent of instructor required. T 3:30–5

IMED 635a or b, Directed Reading in Investigative Medicine Joseph Craft

An independent study course for first-year students in the Investigative Medicine program. Topics are chosen by the student, and reading lists are provided by faculty for weekly meetings to discuss articles. Four sessions are required; dates/times by arrangement. Consent of instructor required.

IMED 645a, Introduction to Biostatistics in Clinical Investigation Eugene Shapiro

The course provides an introduction to statistical concepts and techniques commonly encountered in medical research. Previous course work in statistics or experience with statistical packages is not a requirement. Topics to be discussed include study design, probability, comparing sample means and proportions, survival analysis, and sample size/power calculations. The computer lab incorporates lecture content into practical application by introducing the statistical software package SPSS to describe and analyze data. Consent of instructor required. Two weeks, July 11–22, 2016. MTWThF 8:30–11:15

IMED 655b, Writing Your Career Development (K-type) Grant Eugene Shapiro

In this term-long course, students gain intensive, practical experience in evaluating and preparing grant proposals, including introduction to NIH study section format. The course gives new clinical investigators the essential tools to design and initiate their own proposals for obtaining grants to do research and to develop their own careers. The course is limited to students who plan to submit grant proposals for a K-type mentored career development award. Attendance and active participation are required. There may be spaces to audit the course. Consent of instructor required. W 1–3

IMED 660c, Methods in Clinical Research, Part I Eugene Shapiro

IMED 661a, Methods in Clinical Research, Part II Eugene Shapiro

IMED 662b, Methods in Clinical Research, Part III Eugene Shapiro

This yearlong course, presented by the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, presents in depth the methodologies used in patient-oriented research, including methods in biostatistics, clinical epidemiology, health services research, community-based participatory research, and health policy. Consent of instructor required.

IMED 670b, Writing Your First Independent Investigator-Initiated (R-type) Grant  Eugene Shapiro

In this term-long course, students gain intensive, practical experience in evaluating and preparing grant proposals, including discussion of NIH study section format. The course is particularly designed to help investigators in the “K to R” transition period. The course is limited to students who plan to submit an R-type (e.g., R01 or R21) grant, as well as VA and foundation grant proposals. Attendance and active participation are required. Consent of instructor required. W 3–5

IMED 680b, Topics in Human Investigation Joseph Craft, Karen Anderson

The course teaches students about the process through which novel therapeutics are designed, clinically tested, and approved for human use. It is divided into two main components, with the first devoted to moving a chemical agent from the bench to the clinic, and the second to outlining the objectives and methods of conducting clinical trials according to the FDA approval process. The first component describes aspects of structure-based drug design and offers insight into how the drug discovery process is conducted in the pharmaceutical industry. The format includes background lectures with discussions, labs, and computer tutorials. The background lectures include a historical perspective on drug discovery, the current paradigm, and important considerations for future success. The second component of the course provides students with knowledge of the basic tools of clinical investigation and how new drugs are tested in humans. A series of lectures and discussions provides an overview of the objectives, research strategies, and methods of conducting patient-oriented research, with a focus on design of trials to test therapeutics. Each student is required to participate (as an observer) in an HIC review, in addition to active participation in class. Consent of instructor required. Th 3–4:30

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Italian Language and Literature

82-90 Wall Street, 203.432.0595

http://italian.yale.edu

M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D.

Chair

Millicent Marcus

Director of Graduate Studies

Christiana Purdy Moudarres (82-90 Wall St., Rm. 407, 203.432.0597)

Professors Luigi Ballerini [Sp], Millicent Marcus, Giuseppe Mazzotta (on leave), Walter Stephens [F]

Assistant Professor Christiana Purdy Moudarres

Affiliated Faculty Francesco Casetti (Film & Media Studies; on leave [Sp]), Roberto González Echevarría (Spanish & Portuguese), Gundula Kreuzer (Music), Alastair Minnis (English; on leave [Sp]), David Quint (English), Frank Snowden (History), Gary Tomlinson (Music), Francesca Trivellato (History; on leave)

Visiting faculty from other universities are regularly invited to teach courses in the department.

Fields of Study

The Italian department brings together several disciplines for the study of the Italian language and its literature. Although the primary emphasis is on a knowledge of the subject throughout the major historical periods, the department welcomes applicants who seek to integrate their interests in Italian with wider methodological concerns and discourses, such as history, rhetoric and critical theories, comparison with other literatures, the figurative arts, religious and philosophical studies, medieval, Renaissance, and modern studies, and the contemporary state of Italian writing. Interdepartmental work is therefore encouraged and students are accordingly given considerable freedom in planning their individual curriculum, once they have acquired a broad general knowledge of the field through course work and supplementary independent study.

Special Admissions Requirements

The department recognizes that good preparation in Italian literature is unusual at the college level and so suggests that applicants begin as soon as possible to acquire a broad general knowledge of the field through outside reading. At the end of the first and second years, students’ progress is analyzed in an evaluative colloquium. Applicants who have had little or no experience in Italy are generally urged to do some work abroad during the course of their graduate program. For all students of Italian, a reading knowledge of Latin is essential. This may be acquired during the course of the first year, but applicants are reminded that it is difficult to schedule beginning language courses in addition to a normal graduate program. Students are advised to acquire proficiency in the languages required for the doctoral program before matriculation.

Special Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Candidates must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a second Romance language, Latin, and a non-Romance language (German recommended). The Latin examination must be passed, usually before the beginning of the third term of study, and all language requirements must be fulfilled before the Ph.D. qualifying examination. Students are required to take two years of course work (as a rule sixteen courses), including two graduate-level term courses outside the Italian department. After consultation with the director of graduate studies (DGS), students who join the graduate program with an M.A. in hand may have up to four courses waived. The comprehensive qualifying examination must take place during the third year of residence. It is designed to demonstrate the student’s mastery of the language and acquaintance with the literature. The examination, which is both written and oral, will be devised in consultation with members of the department. In the term following the qualifying examination, the student will discuss, in a session with the departmental faculty, a prospectus describing the subject and aims of the dissertation. Students are admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. upon completion of all predissertation requirements, including the prospectus. Admission to candidacy normally occurs by the end of the sixth term.

Teaching is considered to be an important component of the doctoral program in Italian. Students will be appointed as teaching fellows in the third and fourth years of study. Guidance in teaching is provided by the faculty of the department and specifically by the director of language instruction.

Combined Ph.D. Programs

Italian and Film and Media Studies

The Department of Italian also offers, in conjunction with the Film and Media Studies Program, a combined Ph.D. in Italian and Film and Media Studies. For further details, see Film and Media Studies. Applican